General DC

Review: DuckTales #1

DuckTales01_cvrA-copyDuckTales #1 makes up for allllll the flaws of Uncle Scrooge. It continues the work of the rebooted TV show: establishing the triplets as three separate characters rather than one run-on sentence. The humor that the boys exude perfectly extends from screen to page–the unique humor that makes the show literally laugh out loud funny is inside the pages of DuckTales #1, as well.

The only flaw with DuckTales, which was a problem with Uncle Scrooge as well, is the mistreatment of Donald as a character. His anger seems weirdly under contol. Compared to the Donald that fans know and love, DuckTales Donald spouts less expletives and suffers more slapstick. The series is more about the boys, anyhow, which is where the book (and the new show) really shine.

DuckTales #1 is broken up into two stories: “The Chilling Secret of the Lighthouse” and “The Great Experiment of the Washing Machine”. Both were written by Joe Caramagna, who has an outstanding grasp of DuckTales both old and new. “Lighthouse” reflects a more classic television DuckTales story, with an ancient legend debunked by the triplets exploring “uncharted” territory. “Washing Machine” is a little more modern, with iPhones used for distraction tactics, and the boys displaying their individual personalities. Huey in particular gets to shine as the inventor of the group.

Donald Duck # 1 IDW DT

They’ve come a long way from the original depiction of “the triplets”

The stories have different artists, but  both Luca Usai (“Lighthouse”) and Gianfranco Florio (“Washing Machine”) continue the tradition of pulling from 1940s Donald Duck comics. It’s one of my favorite things about the reboot, and I’m thrilled to see it continue on both show and book. The short tales are great, but I hope that an overarching plot emerges before long. Based on the teaser of issue #2, which features Della Duck on a quest with Donald and Scrooge, readers probably won’t have to wait for clues to a much larger mystery.

WooHoo indeed.

Story: Joe Carmagna Art: Luca Usai, Gianfranco Florio
Color: Giuseppe Fontana, Dario Calabria Letterer: Tom B. Long Editor: Joe Hughes

Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review