Review: Scotland Yard HC

Scotland YardOne of the world’s greatest fictional detectives, Sherlock Holmes, is an integral part of the fabric of crime solving in England, as is the villain, Moriarty. The many crime mysteries include, Jack the Ripper, being one of their most famous, definitely involved those who solve those very crimes, were often overlooked. This is what made Gotham PD, so good, during its run, as the city and the looming shadow of its most famous inhabitant and his rogues’ gallery, is what made the tales so gripping.  It introduced the world that Jim Gordon operates in but also those who are under his command, and are brought to life, especially with the TV show, Gotham, which has made Bullock, a fan favorite.

I often wondered if there were more stories from that same time period, so did the BBC, with their brilliant Ripper Street and Copper, which both examined the complexities of law enforcement in a time where the realities of street crimes became the character of the city. As I often imagined a cop like Vick Mackey, in a world where disease and poverty ruled, while gripping with the end of Victorian England. I even imagined the cops of the Wire, tracking the beginnings of the drug trade, within 19th century London. Needless to say, this is definitely what made Marvel 1602, and the steam punk genre, so intriguing.

Within this story, we follow Inspector Gregson, a much grizzled veteran copper from Scotland Yard, as he screws up a prisoner transfer and is charged with retrieving the same prisoners he lost. What follows is something that reminds of something between The Fugitive and the real life manhunt of John Wilkes Booth. Gregson, is a difficult man, but finds allies, that seem much like the Seven Samurai. By book’s end, Gregson , has proven that he is not a true detective but a leader of men, no matter what side of the law they reside.

Overall, an interesting and gripping book, which pulls you in with the familiar scenery and settings, as well as well known characters, true yet reimagined. The story by Dobbs, is a barn burner, as he reminds you of Dickens, in the way he knows those streets. The art by Stephane Perger, is pretty, gritty, and real. Altogether,a great story, that makes one  yearn for more stories like this.

Story: Dobbs Art: Stephane Perger
Story : 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review