Tag Archives: Webcomics

Acursian, the New Comic Series from John Barrowman, Carole Barrowman, Beni Lobel, and Erika Lewis Launches in September on Webtoon

Formerly titled Cursed, Legendary Comics and Webtoon will debut the new imaginative comic series Acursian starring John Barrowman next month. The series—rooted in Celtic lore in a unique fusion of mythic storytelling from co-creators John Barrowman, Carole Barrowman, and Erika Lewis with art by Beni Lobel and designs by Tommy Lee Edwards—will be available beginning at 11:59pm EST on Thursday, September 13. Readers can download the official Webtoon app by visiting the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Acursian (an Old English word defined as one consigned to destruction, misery, or evil by a curse) stars John Barrowman as Charlie Stewart who, on the eve of an important birthday, falls victim to an ancient Celtic curse. Stewart seemed to have it all: the big house, the fast car, the beautiful family, and a high-power career at a leading criminal law firm, but overnight finds everything spiraling out of control as his perfect life becomes a disaster zone of chaos and calamity. Every decision he makes, every relationship he has, every choice he’s given is doomed to fail spectacularly, no matter what he does.

Embarking on a quest for the truth behind the supernatural forces re-writing his destiny, Charlie discovers that his ancestor Bonnie Prince Charlie made a deal with the ruthless Celtic God of War, Bregon. In return for the Bonnie Prince’s victory at the battle of Culloden, Bregon demanded the prince steal three magical talismans from Bregon’s own sisters. These sisters cursed the entire Stewart bloodline and now Charlie must settle a centuries-long family squabble among gods in order to get his own family back. Real life and ancient legend collide in unexpected ways as Charlie battles across this world and opens up realms of time and mystery that no mortal was ever meant to see.

Those Two Geeks Special: Release Barabbas

On the docket this week: Alex chats with Liam McKenna, the creator of Release Barabbas, a webcomic detailing the life of Jesus Barabbas after he was release from Roman captivity in place of Jesus of Nazareth. You can find a sample of the webcomic below, and can find the rest at the link above.

Release barabbus 1.jpg

As always, the Alex and Joe can be found on twitter respectively @karcossa and @jc_hesh if you feel the need to tell them they’re wrong individually, or @those2geeks if you want to yell at them together on twitter or email ItsThose2Geeks@gmail.com.

 

Go Into the Mind of Bryan Fuller with the Webcomic Mind Palace

Comics creator Dave Dwonch has been a fan of Bryan Fuller for a LONG time. Since the debt of Fuller’s Dead Like Me in 2003, Dwonch has been fascinated with the meteoric rise and quick demise of Fuller’s creations. From Wonderfalls to Pushing Daisies to Hannibal, Bryan Fuller’s creations have been acclaimed by both critics and fans and garnered worldwide attention, only to be cancelled within three years. That’s where Dwonch comes in.

Mind Palace explores Fuller’s creations and the cancellation of his creations. It explores a grieving process that tucks his memories of his creations all into one place, his mind.

The Mind Palace is a place where Bryan has sequestered his creations away. He hasn’t forgotten them, just given them a new purpose as the caretakers of a bed and breakfast in the back of his brain, the “The Fuller House.” Imagine a world where Hannibal Lecter is the Executive Chef to Ned’s Pastry Chef, where actress Caroline Dhavernas’ Alana Bloom and Jaye Tyler exist together. It’s a recipe for madness.

Is being trapped in one place a good thing? Some of these characters will have been impacted by that.

Mind Palace launched on San Diego Comic Con Preview Night with the first complete chapter, and new pages are posted every Tuesday and Thursday. Dwonch and artist Santi Guillen have planned Season One to span an entire year and hope to continue into Season Two in mid-2019.

You can read the entire series for free and help keep the dream alive by donating to their Patreon.

Mike Norton’s Lil’ Donnie Gets Collected in August. It’ll Be ‘uge

Image Comics is winning again with the announcement of the forthcoming Rueben Award-nominated webcomic by Mike Norton (he’s a great guy)—Lil’ Donnie—to be collected into a hardcover edition and available this August.

Believe us, you’re going to love the Lil’ Donnie, Vol. 1: Executive Privilege hardcover which collects the first 125 LIL’ DONNIE comic strips (winning!). This collection follows the timely and terrifying adventures of Lil’ Donnie, the worst president in the history of the United States of America. The incredible men and women who buy this collection will enjoy the first year of antics of a truly motley crew of weirdos and degenerates as they work (HA!) to make our world a better place… for them!

So, let’s spend a lot of money on Lil’ Donnie, Vol. 1: Executive Privilege (Diamond Code JUN180066, ISBN: 978-1-5343-0977-7) which hits comic book stores on Wednesday, August 22nd and bookstores on Tuesday, August 28th. The final order cutoff for comics retailers is Monday, June 18th.

Paul Tobin and Ray Nadine’s Messenger is Out on Webtoons Today

LINE Webtoon’s latest addition to Fantasy/Adventure is Messenger, the story of a 24-year-old bike messenger whose goals are challenged by the gods of divine intervention! Written by three-time Eisner-winner Paul Tobin and illustrated by newcomer Ray Nadine, the first season of Messenger will play out over 26 episodes beginning today. New episodes will go live weekly on Mondays at 12:01am ETMessenger is only available at Webtoons.com or download the app on your Android or iOS and be sure to subscribe to receive alerts on the series.

Messenger follows Dare Crilley, a bike messenger who is utterly unsurpassed. She scoffs at bad weather, traffic is barely an obstacle, and she’s never missed a delivery. That’s good, because Dare is about to discover her mysterious new client is literally divine, and that a dispute between the gods means the fate of the universe rests on a series of increasingly more difficult bicycle deliveries. Will Dare fail on any of these fateful missions? Can she assemble all the parts for the Legendary Divine Bicycle? One thing’s for sure, Dare never backs down when it’s time to deliver.

 

Webcomics Weekly: Hyper Epics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s spotlight on webcomics, where we take a look at one of the many comics available on the web: Webcomics Weekly (you shouldn’t be fooled by the “weekly” part of the title, however, the feature may happen more or less frequently than that). We’re defining webcomics as any comics published online for free consumption by the general public that doesn’t require a  subscription service.

This week we’re taking a look at Hyper Epics, a website that hosts multiple different three page stories. The folks behind the site were kind enough to answer a few questions for us about the webcomic below.

Graphic Policy: In a nutshell, can you tell us what the strip’s about?

Tom Hoover: Hyper Epics is home of the 3 page sagas, where each story is brief yet memorable and has some level of scope (and original music!).  In an age where it often takes several months to tell a complete storyline, we took on the challenge of creating epic tales that are complete and stand on their own in just 3 pages.  Thus, it serves as a destination where readers can come to and be inspired without having to invest their time and money for a prolonged period of time.   

We tackle a number of genres, timeless themes, and sometimes take detours simply for a bit of madcap fun.  

Readers can also expect an experience that is acceptable for nearly all age groups, as we do not promote excessive violence, nudity, or vulgar themes in our stories.  There is enough of this elsewhere and in ample numbers.   

Thomas Tuna: One of the goals of our website that was outlined by Tom Hoover right from the start–and one I heartily embrace–is to simplify the comic-book experience for a whole new generation of comic book enthusiasts. I, perhaps, have a better empathy for the “Golden and Silver Ages” of Comics, simply by being older and having a first-hand appreciation for what it once meant to plunk down a shiny dime (yes, all that four-color magic for just 10 cents!) back in the early ’60s.

Comic book stories were magical then, with the creators striving for a real emotional connection to their readers. We’re doing this again here and now with our three-page Hyper Epics. It’s a real challenge for our writers and artists to tell a compelling story within this framework. But it’s also so rewarding when the job is done right and someone out there enjoys it.  hyper epics sc.PNG

GP: How often do you update?

TH: We typically add new stories 1 to 2 times a week, and we also have other areas of content that we maintain, such as interviews with industry veterans, our Hyperspace column, and more.  This frequency will increase as we add more staff and hopefully some level of funding.

GP: How long have you been producing the strip?

TH: We launched in January of 2018 and have already posted an impressive lineup of diverse and engaging stories since our debut.  The passion in which we have taken this on is evident by the outpouring of creativity we have produced in such a short time.  Our talented artists and composers have really stepped up and are delivering on time and with originality.

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GP: Where did the idea for the strip come from?

TH: Perhaps I had grown weary with the lack of morality tales in our pop culture.  Or maybe it was that I found many of our entertainment choices were too aggressive and laden with their own agendas.  However it came to be, the spark formed for a destination of adventure and inspiration, where heroes continue their eternal struggle against the evil forces of the universe. I think it is important, especially for younger readers, to see that not everything in our realm is wrapped in shades of gray.   It’s a vision that not everyone may embrace due to what they have grown conditioned to, but for those that do appreciate it, the hard work will be well worth it.  

Below you’ll find another example of one of the comics posted to the site, The Last BelieverClick on any of the images in this feature to be taken to the rest of the comic.

hyper epics tb.PNG

 

 


If you’d like to have your webcomic featured here, then drop us an email.

Hyper Epics: An Digital Return To The Spirit Of The Golden Age

hyper epics main.PNGBrevity is the soul of wit, said William Shakespeare, and that’s the motto at the heart of Hyper Epics, an online comic refuge that is home to three page stories where the stories are “a throwback to what comic book stories used to be–and can be again.” Offering a variety of genres, Hyper Epics has something available for almost everybody – as long as you’re looking for a quick five minute hit of comic awesomeness. When asked to expand upon the desire to create comics as a throwback to what they were, and could be again, Managing Edior/Lead Writer Thomas Tuna  said the following:

One of the goals of our website that was outlined by Tom Hoover right from the start–and one I heartily embrace–is to simplify the comic-book experience for a whole new generation of comic book enthusiasts. I, perhaps, have a better empathy for the “Golden and Silver Ages” of Comics, simply by being older and having a first-hand appreciation for what it once meant to plunk down a shiny dime (yes, all that four-color magic for just 10 cents!) back in the early ’60s. 

Comic book stories were magical then, with the creators striving for a real emotional connection to their readers. We’re doing this again here and now with our three-page Hyper Epics. It’s a real challenge for our writers and artists to tell a compelling story within this framework. But it’s also so rewarding when the job is done right and someone out there enjoys it.

newstand comics.jpgTuna isn’t wrong when he says that comics were simpler back during the Golden and Silver Ages when comics were often found on newsstands and specialty stores were few and far between. It was a time when missing an issue was far too easy, something that is nearly unthinkable today – after all if your local shop doesn’t have it the day you walk in they can probably reorder it, or you can find it online (whether a physical copy or a digital version if the story matters more than the physical comic). Back in the Golden and Silver Ages if a comic was missed it was very tough to find again, so most of the comics of the time were limited to one or two part stories that had a some carry over in future issues but not so much that it would leave you lost if you skipped an issue.

By offering short, three page stories, Hyper Epics brings you back to a time when you didn’t have to wait months to finish a story – something that is ideal in a world where many of us find ourselves busier than we’d like. Sitting down with a full trade may not be a possibility for all of us, but a ten minute break with a complete comic should be much more doable.

hyper epics tb

I’ve spent the last week or so doing just that while at work as I did a bit more research into the website, and I can honestly say I didn’t read a bad comic. Sure there were some that weren’t to my taste, but quality was never a concern. It may be a challenge for those creating the comics to tell a compelling story within three pages, but it is a challenge that has been met with each new hyper epic that I have read.  Oh, and in case you wondered, the epics are completely free, so if you have a few minutes to kill, why not fill it with comics?

The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and National Coalition Against Censorship Releases a Comic to Help Protect Students’ Rights

As millions of American students assert their First Amendment rights in protests across the country, advocacy groups Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and National Coalition Against Censorship have released a new comic book to help protect students’ rights. Be Heard! is a free comic by cartoonist Kai Texel that outlines best practices to help kids assert their rights to speech, protest, assembly and petition, warns about risks, and provides resources to get more help. Be Heard! is available for free from CBLDF and NCAC, readers are encouraged to share it freely and broadly in advance of the National School Walkout on March 14, the March for Our Lives on March 24 and local protests across the country.

Stephen McCranie’s Space Boy Lands at Dark Horse

Dark Horse is partnering with writer and artist Stephen McCranie to bring his unique space opera webcomic Space Boy to the page as a four-volume graphic novel series. Currently serialized on Webtoons.com with over 50,000 unique readers, McCranie’s Space Boy is a coming of age story of a high-school-aged girl who belongs in a different time, a boy possessed by emptiness as deep as space, an alien artifact, mysterious murder, and a love that crosses light years.

Amy lives on a mining colony in out in deep space, but when her dad loses his job the entire family is forced to move back to Earth. Amy says goodbye to her best friend Jemmah and climbs into a cryotube where she will spend the next 30 years frozen in a state of suspended animation, hurtling in a rocket toward her new home. Her life will never be the same, but all she can think about is how when she gets to Earth, Jemmah will have grown up without her.

 

Stephen McCranie’s Space Boy Volume 1 goes on sale June 20, 2018.

Mages of Mystralia Goes from Webcomic to Print this January

Dark Horse Comics and Borealys Games conjure up the release the popular Mages of Mystralia webcomic in a new graphic novel coming to bookstores and comics shops in January 2018

Acclaimed fantasy author Ed Greenwood lent his magic to the Mages of Mystralia storyline for the game while writer Brian Clevinger and artist Carey Pietsch brought the lore from the game to the acclaimed webcomic.

The graphic novel will include concept art from the game and exciting bonus material. The game is currently available now, with the graphic novel hitting retailers in early 2018.

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