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Tapas Celebrates Female Creators for Women’s History Month!

Tapas Women's History Month

Tapas continues to forge ahead celebrating creators and for the month of March the spotlight will be on female creators in support of Women’s History Month!

While much of the entertainment industry continues to strive to diversify their community, Webcomics have long had a diverse creator community who are able to find their audience and tell their stories with a high percentage of female readers and creators. In fact, Tapas boasts a female readership of 78% and an amazing 65% of Tapas creators are female.

Here’s a chance to discover new comics and possibly voices you don’t often hear from. Take advantage with this easy guide that Tapas has put together.

Webcomics Weekly: The Mind Palace

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s spotlight on webcomics, where we take a look at one of the many comics available online every Sunday: Webcomics Weekly (but don’t be fooled by the “weekly” part of the title; the feature may happen more or less frequently than that). We’re defining webcomics as any comics published online for free consumption by the general public that doesn’t require a  subscription service.

This week we’re taking a look at The Mind Palace. The strip is created by Dave Dwonch, who was kind enough to answer a few questions for us about the webcomic below.

GP: How often do you update?

DD: Every Tuesday and Thursday!

GP: How long have you been producing the strip?

DD: We launched with 7 pages the Wednesday of Preview night at SDCC, and skipped a couple of weeks before launching twice weekly. 

GP: Where did the idea for the strip come from?

DD: I am a huge fan of Bryan Fuller’s work, and t always bugged me that his shows were always cut short. I think that sometimes happens with genius level stuff– it finds an audience later. Look at stuff like Arrested Development and Wet Hot American Summer; the fans kind of grow into the projects. I think Bryan’s stuff is a lot like that.

I wanted to play with the idea of what might happen if someone’s creations had no where left to go, an wound up festering in their subconscious mind. It leads to some volatile stories, trust me.

Below you’ll find two examples of the webcomic.

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If you’d like to have your webcomic featured here, then drop us an email.

Webcomics Weekly: Amanda Green, SIA

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s spotlight on webcomics, where we take a look at one of the many comics available online every Sunday: Webcomics Weekly (but don’t be fooled by the “weekly” part of the title; the feature may happen more or less frequently than that). We’re defining webcomics as any comics published online for free consumption by the general public that doesn’t require a  subscription service.

This week we’re taking a look at [comic’s name], link. The strip is created by Name, who was kind enough to answer a few questions for us about the webcomic below.

Graphic Policy: In a nutshell, can you tell us what the strip’s about?

Amanda Green, SIA is about an insurance agent in a superhero-filled city.  Well, that’s the initial tagline for the comic.  It began in 2012 and has evolved into a comic about regular people living in a world of superheroes.  It follows the title character, Amanda Green, and her friends as they deal with regular supervillain attacks, alien invasions, and literally anything that happens in superhero comics.

GP: How often do you update?

Currently, we update twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

GP: How long have you been producing the strip?

I’ve been producing Amanda Green, SIA since about 2011, debuting in 2012.  I’m the writer, and I pitched the comic to my friend, Marili Ramirez.  She’s a great artist who I’ve known for years prior to then.  We were going to work on a couple other projects before Amanda Green, SIA, but things just never panned out.  But by 2011, we were ready to work together.  Since then, Marili left the comic in 2016, and I worked with MJ Barros next.  Currently, I’m working with Amy King and have a couple amazing artists lined up for future stories.

GP: Where did the idea for the strip come from?

Amanda Green, SIA came out of seeing so much destruction in so many superhero movies and animated series.  Property destruction is a staple in comics, of course, but for some reason, it never really clicked with me on the page.  But with movies and television, all that destruction feels more real, more palpable (and being an adult with property of my own sure adds to that).  If Superman throws a car at a supervillain, well, that’s SOMEBODY’s car.  Now they don’t have a car.  What is that person supposed to do now?  That interested me.  How do regular people go on with their lives after their car or house is smashed by a superhero or supervillain?  What do they do after they’ve been magically turned into dinosaurs (a thing that actually happens in my comic)?  We see so much media about the lives of superheroes, but we rarely see the lives of regular people in that world.

Below you’ll find two examples of the webcomic.

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If you’d like to have your webcomic featured here, then drop us an email.

Acursian, the New Comic Series from John Barrowman, Carole Barrowman, Beni Lobel, and Erika Lewis Launches in September on Webtoon

Formerly titled Cursed, Legendary Comics and Webtoon will debut the new imaginative comic series Acursian starring John Barrowman next month. The series—rooted in Celtic lore in a unique fusion of mythic storytelling from co-creators John Barrowman, Carole Barrowman, and Erika Lewis with art by Beni Lobel and designs by Tommy Lee Edwards—will be available beginning at 11:59pm EST on Thursday, September 13. Readers can download the official Webtoon app by visiting the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Acursian (an Old English word defined as one consigned to destruction, misery, or evil by a curse) stars John Barrowman as Charlie Stewart who, on the eve of an important birthday, falls victim to an ancient Celtic curse. Stewart seemed to have it all: the big house, the fast car, the beautiful family, and a high-power career at a leading criminal law firm, but overnight finds everything spiraling out of control as his perfect life becomes a disaster zone of chaos and calamity. Every decision he makes, every relationship he has, every choice he’s given is doomed to fail spectacularly, no matter what he does.

Embarking on a quest for the truth behind the supernatural forces re-writing his destiny, Charlie discovers that his ancestor Bonnie Prince Charlie made a deal with the ruthless Celtic God of War, Bregon. In return for the Bonnie Prince’s victory at the battle of Culloden, Bregon demanded the prince steal three magical talismans from Bregon’s own sisters. These sisters cursed the entire Stewart bloodline and now Charlie must settle a centuries-long family squabble among gods in order to get his own family back. Real life and ancient legend collide in unexpected ways as Charlie battles across this world and opens up realms of time and mystery that no mortal was ever meant to see.

Those Two Geeks Special: Release Barabbas

On the docket this week: Alex chats with Liam McKenna, the creator of Release Barabbas, a webcomic detailing the life of Jesus Barabbas after he was release from Roman captivity in place of Jesus of Nazareth. You can find a sample of the webcomic below, and can find the rest at the link above.

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As always, the Alex and Joe can be found on twitter respectively @karcossa and @jc_hesh if you feel the need to tell them they’re wrong individually, or @those2geeks if you want to yell at them together on twitter or email ItsThose2Geeks@gmail.com.

 

Webcomics Weekly: Hyper Epics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s spotlight on webcomics, where we take a look at one of the many comics available on the web: Webcomics Weekly (you shouldn’t be fooled by the “weekly” part of the title, however, the feature may happen more or less frequently than that). We’re defining webcomics as any comics published online for free consumption by the general public that doesn’t require a  subscription service.

This week we’re taking a look at Hyper Epics, a website that hosts multiple different three page stories. The folks behind the site were kind enough to answer a few questions for us about the webcomic below.

Graphic Policy: In a nutshell, can you tell us what the strip’s about?

Tom Hoover: Hyper Epics is home of the 3 page sagas, where each story is brief yet memorable and has some level of scope (and original music!).  In an age where it often takes several months to tell a complete storyline, we took on the challenge of creating epic tales that are complete and stand on their own in just 3 pages.  Thus, it serves as a destination where readers can come to and be inspired without having to invest their time and money for a prolonged period of time.   

We tackle a number of genres, timeless themes, and sometimes take detours simply for a bit of madcap fun.  

Readers can also expect an experience that is acceptable for nearly all age groups, as we do not promote excessive violence, nudity, or vulgar themes in our stories.  There is enough of this elsewhere and in ample numbers.   

Thomas Tuna: One of the goals of our website that was outlined by Tom Hoover right from the start–and one I heartily embrace–is to simplify the comic-book experience for a whole new generation of comic book enthusiasts. I, perhaps, have a better empathy for the “Golden and Silver Ages” of Comics, simply by being older and having a first-hand appreciation for what it once meant to plunk down a shiny dime (yes, all that four-color magic for just 10 cents!) back in the early ’60s.

Comic book stories were magical then, with the creators striving for a real emotional connection to their readers. We’re doing this again here and now with our three-page Hyper Epics. It’s a real challenge for our writers and artists to tell a compelling story within this framework. But it’s also so rewarding when the job is done right and someone out there enjoys it.  hyper epics sc.PNG

GP: How often do you update?

TH: We typically add new stories 1 to 2 times a week, and we also have other areas of content that we maintain, such as interviews with industry veterans, our Hyperspace column, and more.  This frequency will increase as we add more staff and hopefully some level of funding.

GP: How long have you been producing the strip?

TH: We launched in January of 2018 and have already posted an impressive lineup of diverse and engaging stories since our debut.  The passion in which we have taken this on is evident by the outpouring of creativity we have produced in such a short time.  Our talented artists and composers have really stepped up and are delivering on time and with originality.

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GP: Where did the idea for the strip come from?

TH: Perhaps I had grown weary with the lack of morality tales in our pop culture.  Or maybe it was that I found many of our entertainment choices were too aggressive and laden with their own agendas.  However it came to be, the spark formed for a destination of adventure and inspiration, where heroes continue their eternal struggle against the evil forces of the universe. I think it is important, especially for younger readers, to see that not everything in our realm is wrapped in shades of gray.   It’s a vision that not everyone may embrace due to what they have grown conditioned to, but for those that do appreciate it, the hard work will be well worth it.  

Below you’ll find another example of one of the comics posted to the site, The Last BelieverClick on any of the images in this feature to be taken to the rest of the comic.

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If you’d like to have your webcomic featured here, then drop us an email.

Hyper Epics: An Digital Return To The Spirit Of The Golden Age

hyper epics main.PNGBrevity is the soul of wit, said William Shakespeare, and that’s the motto at the heart of Hyper Epics, an online comic refuge that is home to three page stories where the stories are “a throwback to what comic book stories used to be–and can be again.” Offering a variety of genres, Hyper Epics has something available for almost everybody – as long as you’re looking for a quick five minute hit of comic awesomeness. When asked to expand upon the desire to create comics as a throwback to what they were, and could be again, Managing Edior/Lead Writer Thomas Tuna  said the following:

One of the goals of our website that was outlined by Tom Hoover right from the start–and one I heartily embrace–is to simplify the comic-book experience for a whole new generation of comic book enthusiasts. I, perhaps, have a better empathy for the “Golden and Silver Ages” of Comics, simply by being older and having a first-hand appreciation for what it once meant to plunk down a shiny dime (yes, all that four-color magic for just 10 cents!) back in the early ’60s. 

Comic book stories were magical then, with the creators striving for a real emotional connection to their readers. We’re doing this again here and now with our three-page Hyper Epics. It’s a real challenge for our writers and artists to tell a compelling story within this framework. But it’s also so rewarding when the job is done right and someone out there enjoys it.

newstand comics.jpgTuna isn’t wrong when he says that comics were simpler back during the Golden and Silver Ages when comics were often found on newsstands and specialty stores were few and far between. It was a time when missing an issue was far too easy, something that is nearly unthinkable today – after all if your local shop doesn’t have it the day you walk in they can probably reorder it, or you can find it online (whether a physical copy or a digital version if the story matters more than the physical comic). Back in the Golden and Silver Ages if a comic was missed it was very tough to find again, so most of the comics of the time were limited to one or two part stories that had a some carry over in future issues but not so much that it would leave you lost if you skipped an issue.

By offering short, three page stories, Hyper Epics brings you back to a time when you didn’t have to wait months to finish a story – something that is ideal in a world where many of us find ourselves busier than we’d like. Sitting down with a full trade may not be a possibility for all of us, but a ten minute break with a complete comic should be much more doable.

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I’ve spent the last week or so doing just that while at work as I did a bit more research into the website, and I can honestly say I didn’t read a bad comic. Sure there were some that weren’t to my taste, but quality was never a concern. It may be a challenge for those creating the comics to tell a compelling story within three pages, but it is a challenge that has been met with each new hyper epic that I have read.  Oh, and in case you wondered, the epics are completely free, so if you have a few minutes to kill, why not fill it with comics?

Check, Please!: Where Hockey Meets Great Storytelling

bittyWhat do maple-sugar-crusted apple pie, Beyoncé, and ECAC ice hockey have in common? Well, you’d be surprised.

In 2013, a recent Yale graduate by the name of Ngozi Ukazu put her knowledge of New England collegiate life to good use with a simple web comic on Tumblr. Four years later, what began as a grad student’s side-project has become a phenomenon in some cultish circles of the internet, with two wildly successful Kickstarter campaigns and two printed volumes on the way.

What exactly is the comic about, and why is it so popular? Check, Please! follows Eric “Bitty” Bittle, an anime-eyed figure skater turned smaller-than-average hockey player from Georgia whose scholarship depends on his ability to keep his head despite his phobia of physical violence. In a sport where physical violence is key, Bits needs all the help he can get.

But hockey is only a part of the equation. Bitty is also an avid baker and vlogger; his series of videos about food and college life give the comic its title—ha, puns!—and often serve to frame the story, with Bitty serving monologues directly to the reader as though they are a part of his in-universe audience.

Above all, however, the appeal of Check, Please! lies in its representation of friendship and camaraderie that anyone who has ever been a part of a team can relate to. Fraternity, self-acceptance, and diversity of experience are major themes throughout, which explains why so many fans tune in for the adventures of a fictional college hockey team despite having never watched a game.

Check, Please! also owes its storytelling success and cult popularity, in part, to its showcasing of mental illness and very personal LGBT issues which often go unexplored in more lighthearted media. Jack Zimmermann may be the very talented son of a hockey legend, but it is that very pressure which helped lead him to overdose at 18; Eric Bittle may have accepted his identity as a gay man, but that doesn’t mean he’s ready to come out to anyone back home just yet. Each and every character is lovably flawed and facing their own dilemma, which makes the relationships between them all the more special in the eyes of the reader.

Ukazu’s work is real and relatable in its tragedy, its humor, and its examination of what it means to be a young adult making a place for oneself in the world. Documentation of Bitty’s first two and a half years at Samwell University currently exists on its own brand new website (though it can still be found on Tumblr, as well), but if one prefers to consume comics on real, tangible paper, the first of two volumes is set to be published by First Second Books and released in the fall of 2018.

Meanwhile, Bitty’s junior year adventures continue to be published online by Ukazu herself, with updates every other month. And once you’re all caught up, you can always have more while you’re waiting for the next episode—there are countless extras, notes about each update, endlessly entertaining fanworks, and a plethora of tweets from an active (but currently protected, for spoiler-type reasons) Twitter run by everyone’s favorite skating pâtissier. Fans are never at a loss for Check, Please! content, so the best thing to do is dive right in with Episode 1: Eric Bittle. You’ll be ‘swawesome friends with Johnson the Metaphysical Goalie in no time.

Webcomics Weekly: Zulu

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s spotlight on webcomics, where we take a look at one of the many comics available online every Sunday: Webcomics Weekly (but don’t be fooled by the “weekly” part of the title; the feature may happen more or less frequently than that). We’re defining webcomics as any comics published online for free consumption by the general public that doesn’t require a subscription service.

This week we’re taking a look at Zulu. The strip is written by Alverne Ball, who was kind enough to answer a few questions for us about the webcomic below.

Graphic Policy: In a nutshell, can you tell us what the strip’s about?

Alverne Ball: Zulu is the story of teen named Lazarus Jones who becomes possessed by the spirit of the great warrior king, Shaka Zulu, while visiting South Africa with his father. Back home in Chicago, Lazarus finds himself navigating through the turbulent streets of Chicago with friends when he discovers that a big corporation is behind the endless gang violence and disintegration of his neighborhood.

GP: How often do you update?

AB: Zulu will be updated with 2 pages every Tuesday on Afropunk.com

GP: How long have you been producing the strip?

AB: It’s been some years I’d say, too many to want to reveal the real number, but it wasn’t until a year ago I pulled the series back out of the dark closet of my hard drive and felt that it neeWded to get out. In that time there was ups and downs but I had just finished a multi-artist web comic with Afropunk (When We Were Kings) and I thought if I can get the band back together (more importantly, artist Mike Watson) then AP might be the perfect platform for telling this story since they gave me a shot to do WWWK when no one else would hear my proposal, plus I felt that with the rise in violence in Chicago this story spoke truth to a marginalized voice that lives in the middle of all the chaos.

GP: Where did the idea for the strip come from?

AB: It came in part because at the time I had never written a superhero comic and I wanted to challenge myself, you know, to see if i could do it, but at the same time I wanted to fuse my love of history with something or someone that when people saw it they’d get it, i.e. Shaka Zulu, but with a new twist to this hero’s journey and how embracing one’s ancestry and culture can build pride instead of a sense of apathy for that culture because of how its been portrayed in mass media.

Below you’ll find some sample images to when your appetite.

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If you’d like to have your webcomic featured here, then drop us an email.

Webcomics Weekly: Kid Carvers

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s spotlight on webcomics, where we take a look at one of the many comics available online every Sunday: Webcomics Weekly (but don’t be fooled by the “weekly” part of the title; the feature may happen more or less frequently than that). We’re defining webcomics as any comics published online for free consumption by the general public that doesn’t require a  subscription service.

This week we’re taking a look at Kid Carvers. The strip is created by Jason Reeves, who was kind enough to answer a few questions for us about the webcomic below.

Graphic Policy: In a nutshell, can you tell us what the strip’s about?

Jason Reeves: Sure. Kid Carvers is about twins; Marley and Charley Carver, who also happen to both be kid geniuses. The setting is New Orleans, LA. The twins’ stomping ground/base of operation is their grandmother, ‘Moonie’s backyard, where she takes care of them after school. Marley is a cross between Quvenzhané Wallis’ Annie and a mad scientist, and if you put Doc Brown’s brain into Marty Mcfly, with old Kanye’s fashion sense, you get Charley.

They have a bit of a time dodging bullies in school and outsmarting their teachers, but in their spare time they investigate strange occurrences & mysteries only their brilliance can solve.

GP: How often do you update?

JR: Every Wedenesday.

GP: How long have you been producing the strip?

JR: We’ve been posting since January 3, 2017. So we’re only a few weeks in. We’re very new.

GP: Where did the idea for the strip come from?

JR: Having done a few more comic conventions in the past couple years, we saw that there were few if any all-ages books that the kids could take home with them. As much as we love our sort of rated ‘teen’ comics, looking at all those little eyes peering over the table con after con and having to tell their parents that maybe this book or that was a little too old for them, was a problem for us. So we set out to fill that need as we saw it and Kid Carvers was born.

We (Alverne, Kemi, Joe, Brandi, & I) really loved the optics of shows like Doc McStuffins, the Boondocks, comics like Tuskegee Heirs, and webcomics like Bounce, so we set out to create, inspired by content with an animated feel. 

We also wanted to conjure the idea of Black inventors, many that may be the unsung but brilliant minds of our past. Who better to represent the idea than George Washington Carver. I’m a big fan of the inventive mindset, a mind not just willing to rest on convention, but step outside of it to find more optimal methods, and in turn creating new more efficient conventions. Carver was all about that, creating alternative means of production for poor farmers to compete, and even thrive with the resources (peanuts,….) already available to them. That spirit of overcoming is definitely something I wanted to infuse into the twins.

We plan to shine a spotlight on Black inventors, engineers, and scientists who would be the twins’ heroes. Expect to hear mentions of some you’ve heard of and some you haven’t.

Our model is one more creators have started to embrace in recent years, presenting the content as a webcomic and also collecting the pages into print copies. It gives readers their choice of how they’d like to consume the content. If they’d like to support monetarily they can do so, but anyone can enjoy Kid Carvers free of charge, I think its the win win.

You can read Kid Carvers: Engineers of the Impossible every Wedenesday at: http://kidcarvers.com/

Or you can get Kid Carvers: and the Backyard Bike Bandits for purchase at: http://www.133art.com/


Why it’s awesome: Oh man… I don’t honestly think I can say anything more than what’s already been said. Y’all need to check this out yesterday.

Below you’ll find some examples of the webcomic in no particular order..

Kid Carvers Poster v2.jpgKid Carvers pg1 [small].jpgwebcomic pg12.jpgKC advert4.jpg


If you’d like to have your webcomic featured here, then drop us an email.

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