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Review: Undiscovered Country #12

Undiscovered Country #12

Undiscovered Country #12 wraps up the adventurer’s time in Unity as the battle against Destiny Man rages and the sector surviving is in the balance. This second arc is an interesting one as it challenges some of the mission and really leaves readers pondering if Unity is the best that America has to offer.

Though it sucked the will and choice from individuals, Unity as a sector delivered peace through technology. There was no illness or poverty but there was also a technocratic hand that controlled everything. There was a calm and orderly aspect to it all but with it came a heavy and grizzly price. But, even with that we’re left wondering if it’s the best this new America has to offer.

And that’s part of the brilliance of what writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together with Undiscovered Country. We’re presented with an exaggeration of the various aspects that make up the United States. Each has some good and each has some bad. In the end we’re likely going to find out none of them are ideal and ideal is the whole but that’s a ways to go. Instead, with each sector we’re shown the good and the bad and in ways left to decide for ourselves what we would do if we were on this journey. The characters are vessels by which the reader is asked questions.

The world has been masterfully crafted this way and each is clearly thought out as far as its underlying philosophy and what it brings to the table, both good and bad.

That world is help crafted by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi. The duo continue to present amazing art. Each sector so far has been so different from each other but at the same time it still feels like it’s the same world. Along with color by Matt Wilson and lettering by Crank!, Undiscovered Country #12 does an amazing job of showing the corruption of the Destiny Man in Unity. The visuals play heavy into that as well as the Destiny Man’s dialogue. It all comes together to show how different he is from the “clean and orderly” Unity. The battle between forces really feels epic and ground shaking.

Undiscovered Country #12 wraps up the current arc while pointing us on our next adventure… which seems intriguing. The series continues to challenge readers to think about the ideals that make up America and shows what happens when things get unbalanced. It’s a reflection of our world and at times continues to mirror real events. It does what science fiction does best, act as a layered discussion of the world in which we live.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Brett’s Favorite Comics of 2020 and a Reflection on the Past Year

The Recount #1

It feels weird writing a “best of” list for the past year since it’s been so difficult for so many. Writer Ron Marz Tweeted something like any comic that helped to get you through it is a favorite, and deep down I agree with that. It’s been a rough year for so many and it’s one where the comic industry was forced to mature and face reality in many ways.

Things shifted for everyone.

Publishers canceled projects, shifted schedules, and looked to go directly to the consumer. Creators looked for new ways to earn money and also go directly to the consumer. Stores were forced to market more taking to video, email, and social media to keep customers aware of the latest offerings and remind them of classics they might have missed. Some stores didn’t make it through the year. Others expanded. New ones joined the industry. Consumers had more choices than ever before that made it easier to escape the world burning around them and find enjoyment in make-believe worlds where justice prevails in the end.

In the end, though 2020 looked bleak, it left the comic industry as a whole stronger than ever before.

It feels weird doing this “best of” but at the same time I feel like I want to “honor” and spotlight the comics that got me through the year and had me excited to read the next issues. This is what I’ve read so if you don’t see something mentioned it’s not that I didn’t enjoy it, I just might not have read it. Sorry, I can’t read everything (there was a massive glut in webcomics and manga for me).

So, in a bit different spin I’ve split this list into three sections.

  1. Comics where I’ve only read one issue so far, because that’s what’s been released, but am excited to see what comes in the new year.
  2. Comics I enjoyed each month and are kind of a “silver medal” for me. I wanted to acknowledge them but also didn’t want this to be an overwhelming essay. They’ll get more of a nod when I do a video of this.
  3. The ones I was excited to read each month or had an impact on me. These are the ones that go into my regular suggestions of comics to read down the road. The art, the stories, the presentation, they’re all at that “top of the game” level.

All of these are listed in no particular order (hell it’ll probably just be in alphabetical). Enough with the rambling… lets get on with some comics!

2020 gave us one, here’s ones I’m excited to read their second issues in 2021!

  • Batman: Black & White #1 – The first issue had some solid stories but it’s the art that really stood out. It was mind-blowing and one of the best comics visually released this year. Almost every story broke away from standard panels and was just amazing to look at. I have no idea if future issues will be like this but here’s hoping.
  • Black Cat #1 – The last volume was a lot of fun to read and this first issue continued that. Despite being a King in Black tie-in, the issue kept the focus on what Black Cat does best, steal things as everything collapses around her. There’s just a certain style and attitude that the creative team nails with this. It was a fun debut that you could just sit back, laugh while reading, and enjoy.
  • M.O.D.O.K.: Head Games #1 – Marvel’s trying to make M.O.D.O.K. a thing. It’s kind of been his year between an upcoming HULU series, a popular miniature in Marvel: Crisis Protocol, and this comic. The first issue had me laughing and I’m hoping that continues.
  • The Other History of the DC Universe #1 – John Ridley is one of my favorite creators out there. His work in film and television have blown me away. It looks like DC has given him the opportunity to deliver a brutally honest take about the DC Universe from the perspective of people of color and the first issue is one of the best things I read all year. I can’t wait until the second and this man should be allowed to do whatever he wants.
  • The Recount #1 – The issue hit a bit close to reality. The President is a crook and assassinated and there’s an uprising to purge the country of everyone who supported him, from the Vice President down to voters. It was a hell of an opening issue and one that was chilling in so many ways.
Shang-Chi #1

Comics to check out…

These were all great reads and should go on your reading pile. These are ones I made sure to read every month and jumped at reading as soon as they crossed my desk. They’ll all get more love in my video version of this.

The comics that really stood out for the year.

All of these comics were ones that kept me thinking well after I read them and I’d be happy to read them again. Many are still ongoing while others have wrapped up their runs. Each stands out in its own special way.

Ginseng Roots #3
  • Black Widow – Kelly Thompson, Elena Casagrande, Jordie Bellaire, and Cory Petit are the main creators on what’s been released so far and every issue has been amazing. Black Widow has been captured and brainwashed into believing a domestic life is real and hers. There’s been a great mix of humor, action, in this spy thriller and it’s sure to ramp up now based on the latest issue’s final moments. This is a great mix of storytelling and visual coolness.
  • Dead Day – Man, I really want this to be done as a television series and absolutely need more comics. Ryan Parrot, Evgeniy Bornyakov, Juancho!, and Charles Pritchett deliver a masterclass in world-building. Not only do they deliver an interesting story but have crafted a bigger world. For one night, the dead return, and while the comic really told the story of one family, each issue fleshed out enough of what this event’s impact would be elsewhere to get you to think and imagine.
  • Far Sector – N.K. Jemisin, Jamal Campbell, and Deron Bennett have breathed a breath of fresh air into the Green Lanterns with this series. We’re taken to an alien world where a new Lantern named Jo must solve a murder which takes her deep into a corrupt society. It does what science fiction does best, explore our real world. The visuals are stunning as well in what is a comic that’s timely capturing the current zeitgeist.
  • Ginseng Roots – Craig Thompson explores his childhood in what’s one of the most original comics this year. In a small format and with minimal colors, the comic tells us the history of ginseng and Thompson’s childhood.
  • Harley Quinn Black + White + Red – DC really shook things up this year and one way was a greater focus on digital releases. This series was an anthology that delivered a different creative team with every chapter. We got to see over a dozen different takes on Harley Quinn each of which was entertaining. If you want to see how much the creators matter when it comes to the storytelling, here you go. This is also a perfect example of where digital comics should be going from major publishers.
  • Kill a Man – This story focused on a gay man’s battles within the world of MMA was an updated take on the Rocky formula and done so well. You can come at it as a fan of MMA, as someone who’s LGBTQ, both, or just wanting good storytelling. Emotional with great action, it’s a home run from the team of Steve Orlando, Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Al Morgan, and Jim Campbell.
  • Superman Smashes the Klan – The miniseries was collected and it’s amazing. Gene Luen Yang, Gurihiru, and Janice Chiang deliver a comic that captures the heart of Superman. Based on the groundbreaking radio play where Superman takes on the KKK, this comic is amazing in every aspect, from the story to the visuals. Add in some extra material from Yang about his own experiences and it becomes a comic everyone should read and one that helps define Superman in one of his best depictions ever.
  • Vlad Dracul – Matteo Strukul, Andrea Mutti, Vladimir Popov, and Joel Rodriguez tell us the story about the very real Vlad, the inspiration for Dracula. I learned a hell of a lot and would love to see more comics like this. It’s a crazy read that can be enjoyed for the history and education and/or the brutal story itself that would fit any fantasy world.
  • We Live – The first issue was perfection and got me to choke up. Each subsequent issue has built upon the world. In this story humanity is almost over but a mysterious entity from space will save 5,000 children but first they must get to extraction points. This is a few kids’ stories and their journey of survival. By Inaki Miranda, Roy Miranda, Eva De La Cruz, and Dave Sharpe each issue is visually amazing plus there’s some awesome bonus music you can listen to while reading.
  • Yasmeen – Talk about an emotional gut-punch with each issue. Saif A. Ahmed, Fabiana Mascolo, and Robin Jones tell the story of Yasmeen who was captured and tortured by Isis and her attempt to deal with the PTSD while settling after in the United States. Just an amazing blend of storytelling and real recent history.

Review: Undiscovered Country #11

Undiscovered Country #11

Undiscovered Country has been a fascinating journey, one that feels like a spiral into madness. The journey into this new United States has been one that has been a reflection upon our real world while projecting the worst of what we are and could be. This current story arc has been a horror story in the making and Undiscovered Country #11 gives us the full picture of that horror.

Written by Scott Snyder and Charles Soule, Undiscovered Country #11 has our group of explorers still in “Unity”. They’re presented with the truth of the land and all of the negative it comes with. This, while dealing with the attacks from the Destiny Man. Beyond the reality that’s presented, what’s interesting is it presents the role of technology and innovation within US history. It’s an interesting perspective and one that focuses it a unique way. The basic idea is that the US’s technology innovation has allowed us to connect easier. By doing so it has allowed us to live a more isolated and individual life. We can travel long distances allowing us to live further apart. Communication allows us to connect from thousands of miles away.

Undiscovered Country #11 also drops the moment I’ve been expecting where paradise turns into a nightmare. It’s been clear Unity is too good to be true and now we get to see it in its true self. We also get a bit more of a tease about the journey itself and the choice our group of travelers will have to make.

The art of Undiscovered Country #11 stands out as Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi lift the veil of Unity’s true self. Gone are the white walls and clean city. In its place is something much darker and scarier. They’re joined by Matt Wilson on colors and Crank! on lettering. Together, the group has slowly driven the story narratively adding slight visual elements to tip us off as things progress.

Undiscovered Country #11 leaves us to question the nature of Unity and technological advances. Paradise was anything but. We’re also left to question the technology in our own lives. The series continues to be an interesting exploration of American ideals and America’s history giving us an exaggerated reflection of our real world.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Yasmeen #5

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night #2 (Behemoth Comics) – A vampire story taking place in Iran, the first issue had a lot of potential and has us intrigued to see what’s next.

Dark Nights: Death Metal The Secret Origin #1 (DC Comics) – he heroes search for a way to defeat the Darkest Knight through the universe’s past, while Superboy Prime faces down the demonic Batman!

Firefly: Blue Sun Rising #1 (BOOM! Studios) – The event wraps up and promises big changes.

Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion (Source Point Press) – The popular board game comes to comics!

King in Black #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was over the top excitement with impressive visuals. It was a solid start to the next Marvel event and actually paid off a great build up to it.

King-Size Conan #1 (Marvel) – Celebrating 50 years of Conan in comics including Kevin Eastman’s first work at Marvel!

Picture of Everything Else #1 (Vault Comics) – A murder mystery revolving around the art world taking place in Paris at the beginning of the 20th century.

Red Winter (Scout Comics) – If you missed this crime series, it’s now collected and well worth picking up if you’re interested in crooked cops and dirty, gritty, stories.

Scarenthood #3 (IDW Publishing) – The horror series has been solid so far with a focus on parents attempting to solve a horror mystery.

Sea of Sorrows #2 (IDW Publishing) – The first issue created a solid atmosphere and mixed with great art, it was a solid start for those that like tense thrillers.

Undiscovered Country #11 (Image Comics) – The series has kept us on our toes with every issue. We have no idea where it’s all going and what’s next which has made for an entertaining and exciting read.

Yasmeen #5 (Scout Comics) – One of the best series of the year. It’s an emotional punch with each issue but well worth the read.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

THE RED #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Ever: The Way Out (Abstract Studios) – Terry Moore shifts to graphic novels and while we love his serialized comics, a complete story has us excited. This one about prophecies and fallen angels has us very intrigued.

I Walk With Monsters #1 (Vault Comics) – A story about the monsters within as a woman runs into the man who took away her brother.

Kaiju Score #1 (AfterShock) – It’s the most dangerous heist ever attempted. Four desperate criminals are going all in on a once-in-a-lifetime chance to steal millions in art and turn their miserable lives around. The catch? They have to pull it off under the nose of a one thousand-ton Kaiju.

Nailbiter Returns #7 (Image Comics) – The series has been a blast as its had fun with horror tropes keeping readers on their toes and delivering laughs.

The Other History of the DC Universe #1 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – The first issue is absolutely brilliant as the talented John Ridley explores the DC Universe through the viewpoint of its minority characters.

Paris 2119 (Magnetic Press) – Instantaneous teleportation has altered almost every facet of human civilization but that progress has a price. The sci-fi/cyberpunk story has us intrigued.

Power Pack #1 (Marvel) – The Power Pack is back! But, with a law restricting underage superheroes, will they be able to continue to save the day?

The Red #1 (Heavy Metal Virus) – A single government runs the world after a nuclear war and content deemed emotionally dangerous is prohibited. A group of musicians discovers they’re the key to overthrowing the totalitarian government.

Science Comics: Rocks & Minerals (First Second) – Fun for kids and adults, this series are great graphic novels to learn about their topics.

Shang-Chi #3 (Marvel) – The first two issues have been fantastic as the team has reworked a problematic character. It’s full of action and adding so much depth to the character’s history.

Undiscovered Country #10 (Image Comics) – The series has kept us guessing as to what will happen next. The fact we’re constantly surprised is a good thing.

Yasmeen #4 (Scout Comics) – One of the best comics to come out this year, it’s been heartbreaking every issue.

The Witcher: Fading Memories #1 (Dark Horse) – If you’re a fan of the show, check out the new series!

X-O Manowar #2 (Valiant) – The series has been an interesting look at modern superheroes so far as X-O Manowar attempts to figure out his place in the world. The second issue really focuses on what the impact of superheroes would be in a real-world setting.

Review: Undiscovered Country #9

Undiscovered Country #9

The exploration of “Unity” continues in Undiscovered Country #9 which has the team learning more about the technological marvel. What’s been excellent of this story arc so far is that there’s clearly something ominous. There’s something not right about this territory and their promise clearly has a catch.

Writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule continue their exploration of the United States, both literally and metaphorically. Each territory of this new United States is an aspect of what makes up America but exaggerated. This is an America run amok. Undiscovered Country #9 focuses on America’s success in innovation. The internet, the space race, so many things have either begun in the US or the US has improved upon it. But, with so much wonder there has also been terror. The nuclear bomb and so many weapons of destruction and death are perfect examples of the negative. As the characters ponder and discuss, Unity represents both the best and possibly worst of what makes the United States special.

Snyder and Soule continue to present the best of it. Unity’s technology allows anything to happen. Memories are stored and needs are met with just a thought. It’s the concept of nanobots taken to an extreme. But, for all the wonder and possibilities, the two creators also deliver some unease. We question everything we’re told. We, as readers, look for clues as to what doesn’t sit right. Like the adventurers, we the reader are skeptical as to what we’re presented. Snyder and Soule has set expectations and toyed with our trust.

Some of the fun is because of the art by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi. It’s hard to read Undiscovered Country #9 and not look for clues in the art. From the stark white setting that screams clean and disinfected, there’s a coldness about what’s presented. While it’s amazing to look at, the art team delivers a presentation that challenges us to look for clues as to what’s off. There may be nothing at all. But, we’re teased to do exactly that. Part of the dance is due to Matt Wilson‘s colors. While much of the issue is white and gray, there’s some other splashes of color drawing your eye to what’s focused on. The fact some of that is red leads to yet more of an ominous feeling towards those details. Crank!‘s lettering too delivers small clues and delivers slight punches to each scene and moment.

Undiscovered Country #9 continues to take us on an adventure much like Alice in Wonderland. We’re presented a wondrous world full of possibilities but underneath that wonder is horror. But, what’s most impressive is the series continues to hold a mirror to our reality. It may be a funhouse mirror but it’s still a twisted reflection of the world we live in. The series as a whole questions American exceptionalism and the building blocks of our nation. It challenges us to question what’s right and what’s wrong and to think about what happens if any extreme “wins”.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank! Editor: Will Dennis
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.35 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Giga #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

The Department of Truth #2 (Image Comics) – The conspiracy thriller continues and with it feeling like every crazy idea is being accepted as reality today, the series feels like it straddles between satire and reality.

Giga #1 (Vault Comics) – This is what happens when the mechs stop fighting. The series has already sold out of its first printing and will be a hot item this week at comic shops.

Legacy of Mandrake the Magician #1 (Red 5 Comics) – The classic character gets an update and we’re excited to check it out.

Nailbiter Returns #6 (Image Comics) – The series has been an amazing sendup of horror films and the last issue shifted things a bit in its tone and focus. We’re excited to check out more and see where this adventure takes us next.

Power Rangers: Sins of the Future (BOOM! Studios) – A brand new graphic novel set after the events of Power Rangers: Time Force. Based on the traffic we’re getting, this one might be under the radar and under-ordered.

Shang-Chi #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was fantastic with a solid mix of action and down to Earth moments. It’s a great re-introduction of the character with a focus on updating him for modern times but not losing so much of what makes the character great.

Strange Academy #4 (Marvel) – Such a fun series. If you want kids learning to control their magical powers at a school, this is one to check out!

Sympathy for No Devils #1 (AfterShock) – Murder, mystery, monsters, and magic. A brutal murder of the world’s largest Colossal and it needs to be solved. We’re intrigued by the series as it sounds like magic meets cops mystery.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin #1 (IDW Publishing) – One of the most anticipated comics of the year, it’s already sold out and has over 130,000 copies ordered! One turtle remains and he’s on a mission of revenge.

Undiscovered Country #9 (Image Comics) – Anything can happen with this series that has kept us on our toes with every issue. It’s an America cut off from the world and now divided into numerous strange territories, each a commentary on today’s reality.

Victoria and Nora: A Gotham Love Story (DC Comics) – A new graphic novel about a young Victor Fries meeting Nora Kumar. It’s a tragic tale about living life to the fullest and what it truly means to love…and to let go. These graphic novels from DC have been amazing so far and this one has us really excited to read it.

Review: Undiscovered Country #8

Undiscovered Country #8

A divided America full of chaos and unrest. A divided America whose ideals have been perverted and twisted. When Undiscovered Country began, the fantastical series felt much more… fantasy. As the series has progressed, each issue feels like it’s an exploration of the current American zeitgeist. Undiscovered Country #8 begins to explore the slip to technocratic solutions and the impact, both good and bad, of technology on our lives.

The group of explorers have moved on to the second of the thirteen territories and the new United States. The first was called Destiny, the second is Unity. Unity, located in the Pacific Northwest is a technocratic dreamcoat. It’s a society built on nano-technology where one has to only think to be rewarded. Buildings, plants, vehicles, everything has been consumed by an overarching, and most likely overreaching technology. It’s also a world of temptation and clear malevolence underneath.

Writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule delivers a Willy Wonka/Wizard of Oz/Alice in Wonderland journey into a debased America. Our real-world is twisted and explored in ways that feel all to close to home as our reality plays out. While protests flood our streets and the government slides into Fascism, the abuse of technology to manipulate the populace hangs in the background. This second territory feels like that abuse taken to extremes and once again is ahead of the curve as far as topics flooding newspapers.

Much like the debut story arc, Undiscovered Country #8 continues to introduce us to the world. The concepts, basis of reality shift with each keeping readers on their toes. Unlike the more barbaric Destiny, Unity is a world of the future and what ifs? There’s also a clear nightmare waiting underneath it all and it’s a question as to when, not if, that will be revealed. The issue is also a solid entry point. Though the new arc began with the previous issue, this one is fine for new readers to explore the world as they have avatars asking questions they’ll have in the main cast of characters.

The insanity and fantastical is delivered by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi. The art is full of so much detail that it begs the readers to spend time on each page and with each panel exploring the world. Much like our main cast of characters, the visuals are our true introduction to the mystery. We’re forced to piece together what’s going on as our guide, Uncle Sam, only gives cryptic clues.

Matt Wilson does a solid job as the visuals are generally lacking in much color beyond white. With a mostly mono-chromatic look, the colors still really work using some grays to really make the details pop. There’s also work between the trio to deliver something that’s slightly off. Buildings feel like they’re slightly crooked, whether that’s on purpose or not is unknown. But, it feels like it is and done so to show that the technology isn’t perfect and there’s more than meets the eye. Crank!‘s lettering too comes in to play. There is a lot of dialogue and it is laid out well but there’s also a serene aspect to the font choice that doesn’t become apparent until the very end.

Undiscovered Country #8 is another fantastic journey into the crazy world this creative team has created. There’s a horror story awaiting as we’re given the setup that we know is too good to be true. But, where it all goes is unknown. Undiscovered Country is a series where anything is possible and with that it has become a series where we’re forced to expect the unexpected and just enjoy the wild ride.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Lettering: Crank!
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

X of Swords: Creation #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

The Autumnal #1 (Vault Comics) – It already has sold out and there’s another printing coming. A horror comic that’s in demand and could be a good investment.

Brooklyn Gladiator #1 (Heavy Metal) – A futuristic series that’s classic Heavy Metal from Dan Fogler, Andrew Harrison, and Simon Bisley.

Dark Nights: Death Metal Speed Metal #1 (DC Comics) – Run, Flash, run! A tie-in to the “Death Metal” event, the issue is important as you see how the Flash crew are handling things and there are some key moments between Barry and Wally.

Doctor Doom #7 (Marvel) – The series has been fantastic so far and this is a more than welcome return. Just great writing and art and we’re expecting more of the same… in a good way.

Fishkill #1 (Heavy Metal) – A spin down a conspiracy from Dan Fogler, Laurence Blum, and Ben Templesmith. Yes, this does tie in a bit with Brooklyn Gladiator making up the Fogler-verse.

Immortal She-Hulk #1 (Marvel) – A fascinating first issue that explores death in superhero comics. This is much about philosophy and trauma as it is anything else and a very mature read.

Juggernaut #1 (Marvel) – A fantastic start. It’s a comic we didn’t know we need.

Maestro #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was a solid one and began to explore how the Hulk turned into Maestro. It was an unexpected surprise in that it’s a story we didn’t think we wanted but now after reading the first issue, we’re on board. We’re down for the journey.

Mega Man: Fully Charged #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue was amazing. We don’t know the cartoon but the comic blew us away with it’s more mature take on Mega Man, war, and diplomacy.

Power Rangers: Drakkon New Dawn #2 (BOOM! Studios) – If you’re a Power Rangers fan, this seems to be a series where some big things are happening. Big things that’ll impact the line going forward.

RAI #7 (Valiant) – Every issue has rocked so far and we can’t get enough of this series. Absolutely go and get it, Valiant is where it’s at for action/superhero comics.

Undiscovered Country #8 (Image Comics) – This series has been a wild ride so far taking us to an America that has been cut off from the world. It’s a bit of a Willy Wonka ride as each “zone” has a different feel from the rest and in its first arc it has shown anything is possible. This is a series that surprises with every issue.

Unkindness of Ravens #1 (BOOM! Studios) – A magical witch series and we’re down for what looks like solid art and a nice mystery. We don’t know much else beyond the teaser text but that has us interested enough to check the series out.

X of Swords: Creation #1 (Marvel) – The next “X event” is here and we want to see how this new dawn of the X-Men handles crossover events. The bar has been set high… so we’re intrigued… but nervous.

Undiscovered Country #7 Sells Out and Gets a Second Printing with a New Cover by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi

Image Comics is rushing the wildly popular Undiscovered Country #7 by New York Times bestselling writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule and artist Giuseppe Camuncoli back to print in order to keep up with overwhelming demand for the latest issue in one of the most talked about series on shelves. This new printing will feature a stunning wraparound cover by Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi.

Undiscovered Country #7 kicks off a new story arc for the series that made headlines for its flashy arrival in 2019 as one of the highest ordered launches in the nearly five years for Image Central and before gaining further momentum to top the charts for reorders throughout the first story arc.  

After barely escaping the deadly clutches of the Destiny Man, Undiscovered Country #7 follows the expedition team as they cross over into the strange new zone of “Unity”—a futuristic world of gleaming technology and artificial intelligence. But will it be a safe haven for our heroes, or are they destined to be absorbed into the hive mind?!

The series was acquired early on by New Republic Pictures after a competitive bidding war for potential franchise development with Snyder and Soule attached to adapt the screenplay and serve as executive producers alongside Camuncoli. John Hilary Shepherd will oversee development. 

Undiscovered Country #7, second printing (Diamond Code JUL208174) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, September 9.

Undiscovered Country #7, second printing
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