Tag Archives: undiscovered country

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Radical: My Year with a Socialist Senator

Wednesdays (and Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

A Calculated Man #1 (AfterShock) – A math genius who used to run the numbers for a crime family enters Witness Protection and goes in the run after turning state’s evidence.

Albatross Exploding Funnybooks #1 (Albatross Funnybooks) – A new anthology series featuring some of Eric Powell’s fan favorite creations!

Best Archie Comic Ever #1 (Archie Comics) – A series of short stories shaking up the Archie we know with a fantastic group of creators.

Bill & Ted Roll the Dice #1 (Opus Comics) – The time-traveling duo are back in a monthly series of most excellent adventures! The duo are back and having a nice renaissance and we’re excited to see how that translates to comics!

Blue, Barry & Pancakes Vol. 4 Enter the Underground Throwdown (First Second) – The series is a lot of fun for kids and adults and solid lessons… for both really.

Bone Orchard Mythos: Passageway (Image Comics) – The first book in the horror shared universe from Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino. With those two involved, we’re absolutely in for this release.

Bunny Mask: Hollow Inside #2 (AfterShock) – The horror series has us guessing what’s going to happen next and this new primordial force has us intrigued as to exactly that.

Captain America: Sentinel of Liberty #1 (Marvel) – Steve Rogers gets his own Captain America series and we’re intrigued how the two will work together and stand apart from each other.

Clementine Book 1 (Image Comics/Skybound) – The popular character from The Walking Dead video game comes to comics in a young reader graphic novel series!

Deadpool: Samurai Vol. 2 (VIZ Media) – The manga take on Marvel’s popular character has been interesting. We were a bit mixed on the debut but still want to see where the second volume goes.

Do a Powerbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Wrestling gets hardcore when a necromancer asks Lona Steelrose to join the grandest pro wrestling tournament ever.

Eight Billion Genies #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue was a lot of fun as everyone in the world gets a genie to make a wish.

G.I. JOE: Saturday Morning Adventures #4 (IDW Publishing) – Perfectly capturing the 1980s cartoon, the comic is perfect nostalgia and a hell of a lot of fun.

Grim #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue was a hell of a lot of fun focused on a grim reaper who has things go really sideways for her. It left us scratching our heads wanting to see what happens next.

Marvel’s Secret Reverse Vol. 1 (VIZ Media) – Yu-Gi-Oh! creator Kazuki Takahashi takes on Iron Man and Spider-Man!

The Ocean Will Take Us #3 (AfterShock) – The series has a great mix of mystery and teenage drama.

Radical: My Year with a Socialist Senator (IDW Publishing/Top Shelf) – Dive into the world of politics with this graphic novel about true experiences during a political campaign.

Undiscovered Country: Destiny Man Special (Image Comics) – The mysterious villain gets a special issue focused on him!

Why the People: The Case for Democracy (First Second) – Is democracy still the best form of government? This graphic novel attempts to answer that question!

Review: Undiscovered Country #17

Undiscovered Country #17

Our group is in the zone of Possibility with a machine that can create anything. Undiscovered Country #17 presents the possibility of the infinite with an interesting proposal and debate about what to do and how to proceed. In an issue revolving around Ace, we get to learn more about his character and the hope of the possible, that feels grounded in reality, that he represents.

Written by Scott Snyder and Charles Soule, Undiscovered Country #17 begins the issue focused on the possibility of music and ends on something grander. The group is presented with an offer to use the tool in front of them to rebuild the realm they’re in and then use it to create anything they want. And that’s literally anything. They can create a cure for disease, a weapons system to protect themselves, the possibilities are endless. And that sums up a lot of what this arc is about, the possibility of America.

One scene in the issue sticks out and it’s the discussion of what the United States is good at. That’s selling and exporting its own legend. That its message told some sort of truth. In this realm, all of those legends come together and the result is a mess of a situation. But, it’s also clear those legends mean nothing without the people to share them and believe in them, and more importantly to create new ones. There’s a to to chew on in this arc and issue which makes what to ruminate on much more interesting than the specifics of the issue.

Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi continue their fantastic art. Matt Wilson provides the color whole Crank! handles the lettering. The small details of the issue is what stands out as readers will linger on pages to catch the references and hints as to what things represent. Ships in the background are throughout history and concepts and that alone is interesting but it’s the reveal at the end that’ll leave readers excited to guess the references.

Undiscovered Country #17 continues grand ideas. The issue, and series, is one that will challenge readers to think through its themes and debate themselves the concepts within. It’s also a story that can be appreciated for its surface level action and entertainment. In other words, it’s a comic that captures so much about what America is about.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.6 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Venom #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Amazing Spider-Man #78 (Marvel) – “Beyond” has been a fantastic new storyline that has put Ben Reilly front and center and taken the series in an interesting direction.

Eternals #7 (Marvel) – Thanos is now in charge of the Eternals in this jumping-on point.

Ginseng Roots #9 (Uncivilized Comics) – Craig Thompson returns after a break to further dive into his childhood and growing up in the world of ginseng.

Mazebook #3 (Dark Horse) – This series follows a father who lost his daughter but is convinced she’s still out there, at the end of the maze in front of him.

My Date With Monsters #1 (AfterShock) – Dreams are now stalking the real world and Risa Harumi finds herself fighting monsters and finding true love.

Phenomx #1 (Image Comics) – A new comic series from John Leguizamo, we’re intrigued where this former prisoner who undergoes an experiment story goes.

The Recount (Scout Comics) – A controversial election. A nation split. An armed uprising. The series is collected and hits a bit too close to home.

Regarding the Matter of Oswald’s Body #1 (BOOM! Studios) – We’re always up for a solid conspiracy.

Robin & Batman #1 (DC Comics) – The early years of Batman and Robin from the perspective of Dick Grayson. It’s amazing.

The Thing #1 (Marvel) – We’re a sucker for stories staring The Thing.

Undiscovered Country #17 (Image Comics) – This series has kept us on our toes with every issue and we seriously have no idea where it’s going with each issue.

Venom #1 (Marvel) – Coming off an epic run, a new creative team is no onboard the series and we want to see what else can be done with this character who has become a pretty big player in the Marvel Universe.

What’s the Furthest Place From Here #1 (Image Comics) – This one is fantastic and the less we say, the better. Go out and get it, but hurry as we’re expecting it to sell out quickly.

Review: Undiscovered Country #16

Undiscovered Country #16

Undiscovered Country has been a fascinating series taking us on a twisted tour of what makes up America. After exploring individual liberty and innovation, the series takes us to Zone Possibility where we get to examine the myths and entertainment that have spun from the country. Undiscovered Country #16 focuses on American music giving readers a condensed history. As the issue points out, there’s a hell of a history here, far too much to pack into one issue. So, we’re given the basics and shown that there’s far more creation there than any of us realize.

In search of the Anything Engine, the issue feels like it’s full of riddles and puzzles as everyone attempts to figure out what to do next. That’s everything from singing to dealing with the “One-Man Band”. Writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together an interesting issue with Undiscovered Country #16. There’s a bit less of a funhouse feel to the issue and instead it shifts to challenging the readers in some ways. Music is presented to sign that the reader can attempt to decipher along with the characters. There’s a nice tease as a drum beat is discussed and readers can guess as to its significance and what it is before the reveal. It’s an exploration of music in both reading and listening.

The visuals for the series continue to intrigue. Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi have fun with some of the music eras hinted at. A joke about disco is groan worthy but still funny. The One-Man Band is creative and creepy in its design and presentation. The duo continue to create and explore new worlds visually while keeping the series’ look coherent and consistent. Matt Wilson‘s colors continue to enhance everything as greens and pinks help create an unease about the issue. Crank!‘s lettering enhance the emotion and delivers some punch to scenes.

Undiscovered Country #16 is an interesting issue. It doesn’t quite challenge readers about America’s essence like previous issues. But, Undiscovered Country #16 does challenge readers to think about the nation’s contributions to music. It’s an issue that will hopefully spur more investigation much like the characters within must do.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Inferno #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

10 Years to Death (AfterShock) – What happens when the murdered becomes the murderer? That teaser text has us intrigued.

Amazing Fantasy #3 (Marvel) – The series has been fantastic mixing fantasy and superheroes. The art is amazing, it’s just a hell of a lot of fun.

BRZRKR #5 (BOOM! Studios) – The series has been a great mix of action, mystery, and some character depth. It’s clearly all a treatment for a film but it’s exceeded our expectations.

Corset #1 (Scout Comics) – A world-famous reclusive fashion designed and inventor invites a girl to his tower where he plans to reveal his dark secrets to her.

Darkhold Alpha (Marvel) – Scarlet Witch must save the Marvel Universe in this dive into the dark mystical side of the Marvel Universe.

Deathstroke Inc. #1 (DC Comics) – Slade Wilson gets the spotlight again in a brand-new series that seems to shake things up for him a bit as he takes on a team as he’s enlisted by the secret organization, T.R.U.S.T.!

Gun Honey #1 (Titan Comics) – A gun runner is enlisted by the US government to get back the escaped criminal she helped escape.

Human Remains #1 (Vault Comics) – Invading monsters have deprived gumans of feeling emotions which makes Dax and Bisa’s love dangerous.

Inferno #1 (Marvel) – The endgame to Jonathan Hickman’s X-Men run begins here!

Night of Cadillacs #1 (Scout Comics) – Rival supernatural gangs come to Earth in a raiding mission to retrieve life-restoring blood from humans.

Party & Prey (AfterShock) – Alan is used to being ignored by younger guys, so he hardly believes his luck when lithe, handsome Scott makes a move on him in the crowded gay club. But there’s a wolf on the dance floor tonight, and he’s hungry for fresh prey…

Teen Titans: Beast Boy Loves Raven (DC Comics) – The latest graphic novel in the “Teen Titans” series, this one’s a hell of a lot of fun as the various characters start to come together. But, it’s the interaction between Beast Boy and Raven that steals the show.

Transformers: Shattered Glass #2 (IDW Publishing) – The first issue was good and we really want to see where this “Mirror Universe” take on the Transformers goes.

Unborn #1 (Source Point Press) – On a strange world, five explorers mine for super fuels in a last-ditch effort to save a collapsing Earth, but the mission goes to hell when they are overrun by a hostile alien species.

Undiscovered Country #16 (Image Comics) – Each issue is a wild ride and gets us to think about about what makes up “America”. A series that entertains and has some depth to it.

Review: Undiscovered Country #15

Undiscovered Country #15

Welcome to “Zone Possibility” the latest part of a fractured United States. Undiscovered Country #15 lays out what the latest zone is about giving us the myth of America. “Zone Possibility” is an interesting one. So far, it’s populated with the stories that America is built upon. It’s a blend of “America f-yeah” full of characters who have taken on mythical proportions in the founding of our nation.

Undiscovered Country has always been an interesting series. While it has a surface level adventure, Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together a series the explores the various aspects that make up the nation. Those aspects are both good and bad. This latest “zone” looks to take that aspect and make it a literal manifestation. The nation is built upon stories and myths but underneath is something nefarious. There’s a clear exploration of the “American dream” and how that compares to the “American reality”. How far the two will take it will be interesting but so far, there’s no issue hinting at the criticism to come.

It’s hard to discuss the interesting twists but there’s a lot to ponder by the end of the issue. The direction feels pretty obvious but that doesn’t mean there’s not a lot to mine as far as ideas, exploration, and criticism. That extends to the exportation of America’s ideas and myths to the rest of the world. There’s some pretty deep reading possible with what’s presented in just this issue.

Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi deliver the art joined by Matt Wilson on color and Crank! on lettering. What’s been great about the series is that each zone explored so far has such personality but at the same time everything works together. What’s interesting with Undiscovered Country #15 is the design and what’s presented in itself tells such a story. These are interpretations of American myths and history and we see a slightly worn down and beaten version of each. It’s a subtle detail but one that fits quite well into the world and what Snyder and Soule presents.

Undiscovered Country #15 is a solid issue of the series. There’s a lot to debate and think about. Each chapter has been an interesting examination of a facet of America. Each has entertained with lots of action and excitement and at the same time also delivered multiple layers to ruminate on. This issue is no exception to that delivering a look at this new zone and one that’ll already have you examining what’s being debated.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Almost American #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Almost American #1 (AfterShock) – The true story about two Russian spies as they defect to the United States.

Batman: Fear State: Alpha #1 (DC Comics) – The next Batman event is coming and the Scarecrow is at the center of it. We’re excited to see where this storyline is going as its been building since the line picked up after Future State.

Dark Ages #1 (Marvel) – Marvel has been teasing this miniseries and we’re still not sure exactly what it is but we’re intrigued since we’re so in the dark.

Eighty Days (BOOM! Studios/Archaia) – A graphic novel about a pilot who wants to just fly with freedom. But, Jay meets Felix, a thief who draws him into the struggle against the looming aviation guild.

Telepaths #1 (AWA Studios) – J. Michael Straczynski and Steve Epting are enough to get us to want to check this out where an electromagnetic disturbance awakens telepathic powers in a tenth of the Earth’s population.

Transformers: King Grimlock #2 (IDW Publishing) – The first issue was an interesting one putting Grimlock on a different world where he’ll have to decide if he’ll be a hero or just his usual pain in the butt.

Undiscovered Country #15 (Image Comics) – The series has been a wild ride with every arc. You never know where it’s going or what the creators are going to come up with making this a comic series that keeps its readers on their toes.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Infinite Frontier #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

American Cult: Graphic History of Religious Cults in America (Silver Sprocket) – This graphic novel is a series of shorts from a variety of creators examining famous cults in the US.

Batman: Reptilian #1 (DC Comics) – Garth Ennis and Liam Sharp dive into the world of Batman. Yes please!

Checkmate #1 (DC Comics) – The events of Event Leviathan pick up as DC’s best spies come together as part of the new Checkmate to take on Leviathan.

Gamma Flight #1 (Marvel) – The gamma-infused group gets the spotlight in a new series and we’re excited to see where this quirky group goes.

Good Luck #1 (BOOM! Studios) – What if luck was quantifiable and something everyone was born with? The concept sounds really cool, especially since this focuses on those that are born with absolutely zero luck.

Harley Quinn #4 (DC Comics) – The series has been a lot of fun tying into the greater Batman meta-story while keeping it squarely on Harley and in her own voice. Add in amazing art and you have a combination we love.

Infinite Frontier #1 (DC Comics) – The latest DC status-quo has opened up an infinite amount of possibilities. This series looks to explore that and what this new status means both good and bad.

Heroes Return #1 (Marvel) – The event has been a bit mixed in quality but we want to see where it goes and how it ends.

MFKZ #1 (Behemoth) – We don’t know about the movie but the art looks really cool.

Nuclear Family #5 (AfterShock) – The series has been some B-movie fun and we really want to see how it all wraps up.

Shadowman #3 (Valiant) – The series has been solid so far as a re-introduction of the character that’s perfect for long-time fans and new readers.

Spawn Universe #1 (Image Comics) – Back in the day Spawn had a corner of the comic universe with numerous tie-in comics. History repeats itself as Spawn again expands out in the first of what is many series to come. We’re intrigued to see where this decades-old franchise goes.

Stray Dogs #5 (Image Comics) – The series has ramped up the tension and scares and it’s clear who the villain is. We’re tense to see how this series wraps up and if the dogs get out alive.

Undiscovered Country #13 (Image Comics) – The series has been completely out there in concepts and kept us on our toes as to what will happen next. After a slight break, it’s back and we’re excited to see where it goes.

Vinyl #1 (Image Comics) – A story of psychopaths, sweet love, and a serial killer named Walter. Well, ok then.

Wonder Woman: Black & Gold #1 (DC Comics) – DC has been knocking it out of the park with a series of releases focused on the “colors” of various heroes. The anthologies have been top-notch with some real gems. We can’t wait to see what this one brings.

Review: Undiscovered Country #12

Undiscovered Country #12

Undiscovered Country #12 wraps up the adventurer’s time in Unity as the battle against Destiny Man rages and the sector surviving is in the balance. This second arc is an interesting one as it challenges some of the mission and really leaves readers pondering if Unity is the best that America has to offer.

Though it sucked the will and choice from individuals, Unity as a sector delivered peace through technology. There was no illness or poverty but there was also a technocratic hand that controlled everything. There was a calm and orderly aspect to it all but with it came a heavy and grizzly price. But, even with that we’re left wondering if it’s the best this new America has to offer.

And that’s part of the brilliance of what writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together with Undiscovered Country. We’re presented with an exaggeration of the various aspects that make up the United States. Each has some good and each has some bad. In the end we’re likely going to find out none of them are ideal and ideal is the whole but that’s a ways to go. Instead, with each sector we’re shown the good and the bad and in ways left to decide for ourselves what we would do if we were on this journey. The characters are vessels by which the reader is asked questions.

The world has been masterfully crafted this way and each is clearly thought out as far as its underlying philosophy and what it brings to the table, both good and bad.

That world is help crafted by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi. The duo continue to present amazing art. Each sector so far has been so different from each other but at the same time it still feels like it’s the same world. Along with color by Matt Wilson and lettering by Crank!, Undiscovered Country #12 does an amazing job of showing the corruption of the Destiny Man in Unity. The visuals play heavy into that as well as the Destiny Man’s dialogue. It all comes together to show how different he is from the “clean and orderly” Unity. The battle between forces really feels epic and ground shaking.

Undiscovered Country #12 wraps up the current arc while pointing us on our next adventure… which seems intriguing. The series continues to challenge readers to think about the ideals that make up America and shows what happens when things get unbalanced. It’s a reflection of our world and at times continues to mirror real events. It does what science fiction does best, act as a layered discussion of the world in which we live.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Brett’s Favorite Comics of 2020 and a Reflection on the Past Year

The Recount #1

It feels weird writing a “best of” list for the past year since it’s been so difficult for so many. Writer Ron Marz Tweeted something like any comic that helped to get you through it is a favorite, and deep down I agree with that. It’s been a rough year for so many and it’s one where the comic industry was forced to mature and face reality in many ways.

Things shifted for everyone.

Publishers canceled projects, shifted schedules, and looked to go directly to the consumer. Creators looked for new ways to earn money and also go directly to the consumer. Stores were forced to market more taking to video, email, and social media to keep customers aware of the latest offerings and remind them of classics they might have missed. Some stores didn’t make it through the year. Others expanded. New ones joined the industry. Consumers had more choices than ever before that made it easier to escape the world burning around them and find enjoyment in make-believe worlds where justice prevails in the end.

In the end, though 2020 looked bleak, it left the comic industry as a whole stronger than ever before.

It feels weird doing this “best of” but at the same time I feel like I want to “honor” and spotlight the comics that got me through the year and had me excited to read the next issues. This is what I’ve read so if you don’t see something mentioned it’s not that I didn’t enjoy it, I just might not have read it. Sorry, I can’t read everything (there was a massive glut in webcomics and manga for me).

So, in a bit different spin I’ve split this list into three sections.

  1. Comics where I’ve only read one issue so far, because that’s what’s been released, but am excited to see what comes in the new year.
  2. Comics I enjoyed each month and are kind of a “silver medal” for me. I wanted to acknowledge them but also didn’t want this to be an overwhelming essay. They’ll get more of a nod when I do a video of this.
  3. The ones I was excited to read each month or had an impact on me. These are the ones that go into my regular suggestions of comics to read down the road. The art, the stories, the presentation, they’re all at that “top of the game” level.

All of these are listed in no particular order (hell it’ll probably just be in alphabetical). Enough with the rambling… lets get on with some comics!

2020 gave us one, here’s ones I’m excited to read their second issues in 2021!

  • Batman: Black & White #1 – The first issue had some solid stories but it’s the art that really stood out. It was mind-blowing and one of the best comics visually released this year. Almost every story broke away from standard panels and was just amazing to look at. I have no idea if future issues will be like this but here’s hoping.
  • Black Cat #1 – The last volume was a lot of fun to read and this first issue continued that. Despite being a King in Black tie-in, the issue kept the focus on what Black Cat does best, steal things as everything collapses around her. There’s just a certain style and attitude that the creative team nails with this. It was a fun debut that you could just sit back, laugh while reading, and enjoy.
  • M.O.D.O.K.: Head Games #1 – Marvel’s trying to make M.O.D.O.K. a thing. It’s kind of been his year between an upcoming HULU series, a popular miniature in Marvel: Crisis Protocol, and this comic. The first issue had me laughing and I’m hoping that continues.
  • The Other History of the DC Universe #1 – John Ridley is one of my favorite creators out there. His work in film and television have blown me away. It looks like DC has given him the opportunity to deliver a brutally honest take about the DC Universe from the perspective of people of color and the first issue is one of the best things I read all year. I can’t wait until the second and this man should be allowed to do whatever he wants.
  • The Recount #1 – The issue hit a bit close to reality. The President is a crook and assassinated and there’s an uprising to purge the country of everyone who supported him, from the Vice President down to voters. It was a hell of an opening issue and one that was chilling in so many ways.
Shang-Chi #1

Comics to check out…

These were all great reads and should go on your reading pile. These are ones I made sure to read every month and jumped at reading as soon as they crossed my desk. They’ll all get more love in my video version of this.

The comics that really stood out for the year.

All of these comics were ones that kept me thinking well after I read them and I’d be happy to read them again. Many are still ongoing while others have wrapped up their runs. Each stands out in its own special way.

Ginseng Roots #3
  • Black Widow – Kelly Thompson, Elena Casagrande, Jordie Bellaire, and Cory Petit are the main creators on what’s been released so far and every issue has been amazing. Black Widow has been captured and brainwashed into believing a domestic life is real and hers. There’s been a great mix of humor, action, in this spy thriller and it’s sure to ramp up now based on the latest issue’s final moments. This is a great mix of storytelling and visual coolness.
  • Dead Day – Man, I really want this to be done as a television series and absolutely need more comics. Ryan Parrot, Evgeniy Bornyakov, Juancho!, and Charles Pritchett deliver a masterclass in world-building. Not only do they deliver an interesting story but have crafted a bigger world. For one night, the dead return, and while the comic really told the story of one family, each issue fleshed out enough of what this event’s impact would be elsewhere to get you to think and imagine.
  • Far Sector – N.K. Jemisin, Jamal Campbell, and Deron Bennett have breathed a breath of fresh air into the Green Lanterns with this series. We’re taken to an alien world where a new Lantern named Jo must solve a murder which takes her deep into a corrupt society. It does what science fiction does best, explore our real world. The visuals are stunning as well in what is a comic that’s timely capturing the current zeitgeist.
  • Ginseng Roots – Craig Thompson explores his childhood in what’s one of the most original comics this year. In a small format and with minimal colors, the comic tells us the history of ginseng and Thompson’s childhood.
  • Harley Quinn Black + White + Red – DC really shook things up this year and one way was a greater focus on digital releases. This series was an anthology that delivered a different creative team with every chapter. We got to see over a dozen different takes on Harley Quinn each of which was entertaining. If you want to see how much the creators matter when it comes to the storytelling, here you go. This is also a perfect example of where digital comics should be going from major publishers.
  • Kill a Man – This story focused on a gay man’s battles within the world of MMA was an updated take on the Rocky formula and done so well. You can come at it as a fan of MMA, as someone who’s LGBTQ, both, or just wanting good storytelling. Emotional with great action, it’s a home run from the team of Steve Orlando, Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Al Morgan, and Jim Campbell.
  • Superman Smashes the Klan – The miniseries was collected and it’s amazing. Gene Luen Yang, Gurihiru, and Janice Chiang deliver a comic that captures the heart of Superman. Based on the groundbreaking radio play where Superman takes on the KKK, this comic is amazing in every aspect, from the story to the visuals. Add in some extra material from Yang about his own experiences and it becomes a comic everyone should read and one that helps define Superman in one of his best depictions ever.
  • Vlad Dracul – Matteo Strukul, Andrea Mutti, Vladimir Popov, and Joel Rodriguez tell us the story about the very real Vlad, the inspiration for Dracula. I learned a hell of a lot and would love to see more comics like this. It’s a crazy read that can be enjoyed for the history and education and/or the brutal story itself that would fit any fantasy world.
  • We Live – The first issue was perfection and got me to choke up. Each subsequent issue has built upon the world. In this story humanity is almost over but a mysterious entity from space will save 5,000 children but first they must get to extraction points. This is a few kids’ stories and their journey of survival. By Inaki Miranda, Roy Miranda, Eva De La Cruz, and Dave Sharpe each issue is visually amazing plus there’s some awesome bonus music you can listen to while reading.
  • Yasmeen – Talk about an emotional gut-punch with each issue. Saif A. Ahmed, Fabiana Mascolo, and Robin Jones tell the story of Yasmeen who was captured and tortured by Isis and her attempt to deal with the PTSD while settling after in the United States. Just an amazing blend of storytelling and real recent history.
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