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Review: Nuclear Family

It’s the 1950s and the threat of nuclear war is real. After a bomb drops a family wakes up in the future where the world is far different.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology
Bookshop


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: We Only Kill Each Other #1

We Only Kill Each Other #1

Written by Stephanie Phillips
Art by Peter Krause
Colored by Ellie Wright
Cover by Dave Johnson
Lettered by Troy Peteri
Purchase: comiXologyAmazon

The year is 1938. The threat of World War II looms over the United States, where Nazi sympathizers and fascists have taken root on American soil in alarming numbers. In New York City, resistance to the American Nazi movement grows amongst the ranks of Jewish-American gangsters. Enter Jonas Kaminsky, a rising small-time gangster who’s embroiled in a turf war with Levi Solomon, an old-time mob boss with millions tied up in gambling and booze. When thrown together in an unexpected circumstance, it turns out that the one thing these gangsters hate more than each other is Nazis.

Part of the comiXology Originals line of exclusive digital content only available on comiXology and Kindle. This title is available as part of comiXology Unlimited, Kindle Unlimited and Prime Reading.

We Only Kill Each Other issue #1

Review: We Only Kill Each Other #1

We Only Kill Each Other #1

We Only Kill Each Other #1 feels like it’s a bit of a reminder of our history that we should be reminded of for today. Set in 1938, World War II looms over the United States. While we might think we rallied to take on Nazis and fascists with ease, the reality is that they had a lot of sympathizers on American soil. Some of the resistance that fought the Nazis here at home were the Jewish-American gangsters who put aside their differences to take on the threat they saw coming. This is the story of two gangsters, rivals thrown together to realize they hate Nazis more than each other.

Created by Stephanie Phillips and Peter Krause, We Only Kill Each Other #1 kicks off with a story fans of gangster tales will appreciate. We’re introduced to Jonas Kaminsky and Levi Solomon, two individuals who are full of clichés and stereotypes that make their type of characters interesting and engaging. One is a hot head firebrand willing to start a fight in a bar. The other is the more thoughtful boss who’s deeply religious but has no problem putting a gun to the head of someone during Shabbat. There’s an interesting mix between the two that when they eventually come together should make for a lot of entertaining moments.

But Phillips and Krause also make sure to take the time to present the threat Kaminsky and Solomon are going to face. In a very well done scene, we’re slowly introduced to the Nazi threat. It’s not just through a speech but also violence that’s somewhat shown. Krause takes the very smart direction to both show and not show the violence of a crowd beating a would-be assassin screaming “Kill the Jew”. It punctuates what’s happening but at the same time also allows the imagination to run wild with the specifics.

Krause’s art is solid like that. With color by Ellie Wright and lettering by Troy Peteri, the comic does a great job of hitting those key moments. An individual is killed after spilling some info with the gory details left off the panel. The crowd beating an individual. A fight that we see only as it’s about to begin. There’s a lot of engaging moments that does a solid balance of delivering the right beats and showing the reader just enough.

We Only Kill Each Other #1 does a solid job of reminding readers that there was a Nazi threat here on American soil. It wasn’t a clear rally to defeat them during World War II. Much like today, there was sympathizers who would bring their hate to our soil. Much like then, this series seems like it’ll remind us that we need to stand up to defeat them and it won’t necessarily be a pretty battle.

Created by: Stephanie Phillips and Peter Krause Story: Stephanie Phillips Art: Peter Krause
Color: Ellie Wright Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

comiXology provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindle

Preview: We Only Kill Each Other #1

We Only Kill Each Other #1

Written by Stephanie Phillips
Art by Peter Krause
Colored by Ellie Wright
Cover by Dave Johnson
Lettered by Troy Peteri
Purchase: comiXologyAmazon

The year is 1938. The threat of World War II looms over the United States, where Nazi sympathizers and fascists have taken root on American soil in alarming numbers. In New York City, resistance to the American Nazi movement grows amongst the ranks of Jewish-American gangsters. Enter Jonas Kaminsky, a rising small-time gangster who’s embroiled in a turf war with Levi Solomon, an old-time mob boss with millions tied up in gambling and booze. When thrown together in an unexpected circumstance, it turns out that the one thing these gangsters hate more than each other is Nazis.

Part of the comiXology Originals line of exclusive digital content only available on comiXology and Kindle. This title is available as part of comiXology Unlimited, Kindle Unlimited and Prime Reading.

We Only Kill Each Other issue #1

Jace Fox Heads to New York City in February in I Am Batman #6

The fallout from Fear State begins next year as Jace Fox and his family leave Gotham for a new home base. I Am Batman #6, written by John Ridley, shifts the series permanently to New York. I Am Batman #6 marks the first time an ongoing Batman title will be based in New York City since issue #47 of Detective Comics in January 1941. Gotham City makes its official debut in the DC Universe later that same year, in Batman #4 and Detective Comics #48. 

From his first appearance in DC’s Future State event, to developing his history and mission in The Next Batman: Second Son, to joining Batman and his allies in defeating The Scarecrow and The Magistrate in Fear State, Jace Fox has become a rich addition to the Bat-family at the hands of Ridley.

On sale February 8, 2022, I Am Batman #6 (“Empire State of Mind”) features art by Ken Lashley, colors by Rex Lokus, and letters by Troy Peteri. The book features a main cover by Olivier Coipel and Alex Sinclair, with a primary variant by Francesco Mattina. Fans can also pre-order the book with a special 1:25 ratio variant cover by Khary Randolph and Emilio Lopez, as well as a special Black History Month variant cover by Alexis Franklin.

To see exactly what drives Jace and his family to move to New York, make sure to also check out I Am Batman #5, available in stores and on participating digital platforms on Tuesday, January 11. 2022.

Get an Early Look at I Am Batman #4

The Scarecrow’s campaign of terror and The Magistrate’s aggressive attempts to pacify Gotham City comes to a head for Batman and all his allies with the explosive conclusion to Fear State this month! Jace Fox has been on the front lines, fighting his own war with The Magistrate’s forces, and here’s your first look at some stunning visuals from I Am Batman #4 by artist Stephen Segovia

Following the collapse of the Magistrate program, Jace Fox is still doing damage control from the events of Fear State. Amidst its defeat, a Magistrate hit team is on the hunt for The Next Batman, looking for some serious payback. Find out more about Jace’s newest adversaries when the issue hits comic book shops and participating digital retailers on Tuesday, December 14! I Am Batman is written by award-winning screenwriter John Ridley, with art by Segovia and Christian Duce, colors by Rex Lokus and letters by Troy Peteri. The main cover is by Gerardo Zaffino, with the card stock variant cover by Rafael Sarmento. A 1 in 25 “ratio” variant by Max Dunbar is also available, check with your local comic book shop for availability. 

I Am Batman #4

Review: I Am Batman #2

John Ridley continues to give us a different take on Batman as the series begins to tie itself into Fear State.

Story: John Ridley
Art: Olivier Coipel
Color: Stephen Segovia
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: I Am Batman #2

I Am Batman #2

John Ridley has been putting together an interesting story with I Am Batman. Coming from the world of film and television, it’s not surprising that Ridley’s approach has differed from other comic writers. While one can pick up each volume of his works on their own to read, it’s the overarching story that makes each stand out. I Am Batman #2 has Jace attempting to put the pieces of the puzzle together. He’s getting dragged into the current “event” “Fear State” and is convinced what he’s investigating is tied into the Magistrate and Scarecrow.

Ridley’s take on Batman is different in multiple ways. We’re seeing “year one” in many ways as Jace slowly is figuring out what he’s doing in some dangerous on the job training. This isn’t a polished Batman at all, instead delivering a bit more of a brutal ground level take on the character. There’s no issues breaking bones or a knife plunging into a bad guys’ leg. The theatrics aren’t as present and instead it’s a much more direct approach to things. The differences are there.

What’s more intriguing is what Ridley does with the character in this issue. The traditional Batman has had his jaw out in the open for individuals to see. You can see his mouth move and you know he’s likely white. Jace’s take covers that space though in this issue uses it to an advantage. In a scene I probably lingered on for far too long, Jace removes the plate to his enemy. In doing so he makes it clear that this is not the regular Batman. This is one who operates differently. I can’t also help but think that there is something to signaling that this Batman is Black. Jace uses it all to his advantage and in doing so will create a potentially interesting dynamic that I hope Ridley will explore further.

Stephen Segovia‘s art is solid. With Rex Lokus on color and lettering by Troy Peteri, the art continues to forgo the splashy spreads and two-page entrances. Here, things are kept to a partial page or a panel. Jace on a motorcycle launches in with a multi-panel page delivering a different feel of an entrance than we’re normally used to. There’s a bit more of a focus on the physicality of this Batman. Fights are close combat and up close, relying less on gadgets to stop the enemy. It all comes together for a comic with a very different feel than Batman.

I Am Batman #2 continues Jace’s journey in the cowl. He’s not a polished crime-fighter. The approach is far different and attitude as well. And it’s all perfectly caught in the writing and the art. This is a series for those that love the long game and storytelling. Where Jace is here will not be the same character a year from now. And watching John Ridley plot and guide that growth will be a potential masterclass in storytelling.

Story: John Ridley Art: Stephen Segovia
Color: Rex Lokus Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for a review


Purchase: comiXologyKindle Zeus ComicsTFAW

Review: The Lot #4

It’s a confrontation to end the curse as The Lot #4 wraps up the horror series.

Story: Marguerite Bennett, Peter Milligan
Art: Renato Guedes, Juan José Ryp
Letterer: Troy Peteri, Dave Sharpe

Find a comic shop to get your copy

Or, buy your copy at the link below:

Zeus Comics


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Head Back to the 80s with Download, a Love Letter to 80s Sci-fi and Action Movies with Kids

For fans of The Goonies, Gremlins, and classic Amblin style films what’s old is new again Red 5 Comics’ paean to classic 80s sci-fi adventure Download, in stores this December. Creator and writer Scott Chitwood re-teams with artist Danny Luckert for the series. Colors are by PH Gomes with lettering by Troy Peteri and Dave Lanphear.

A bolt of light from the sky strikes young Eric one evening and life will never be the same for him or his friends. When Eric comes to his mind is filled with plans and schematics for strange devices. Devices for which he has no idea what they do or how they work, only that he is compelled to build them and turn them on…

Channeling that love and nostalgia for classic 80s films, Download will re-visit and re-invent classic sci-fi adventure this Christmas as a four issue monthly series beginning December 2021.

Download #1
Almost American
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