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Review: Nuclear Family #5

It’s the tension of the Cold War and then the bombs begin to fall. Nuclear Family #5 wraps up the series but will they make it home?

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: Nuclear Family #5

NUCLEAR FAMILY #5

Writer: Stephanie Phillips 
Artist: Tony Shasteen 
Colorist: JD Mettler 
Letterer: Troy Peteri 
Cover: Tony Shasteen w/ JD Mettler
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 6.23.2021

Thrust into an alternate reality where the Cold War turned hot and nuclear fire rained down on America, the McClean family is faced with a future replete with nuclear experimentation and deadly political machinations. Even if the McCleans can make it back to their own timeline, is there any way to avoid the post-apocalyptic future awaiting them?

NUCLEAR FAMILY #5

Review: Nuclear Family #4

It’s the tension of the Cold War and then the bombs begin to fall. Nuclear Family #4 explains that shock twist at the end of the last issue as we get a better glimpse of the facility.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Future State: Gotham #1

Future State: Gotham #1

When it came to DC’s Future State two-month event, the Batman portion is the one that stood out the most. Gotham was now under the protection of a fascist police force called the Magistrate. “Masks” are now outlawed and hunted. Red Hood was now a bounty hunter, having shunned his friends, and now working for the Magistrate. Future State: Gotham #1 takes us back to this possible future and Red Hood’s mission.

Written by Joshua Williamson and Dennis Culver, we head back to the future. Red Hood has gone solo doing what he can to stop the remaining Batman rogues. But, he’s now employed by the Magistrate. The creative team does a solid job of setting things up. Future State: Gotham #1 is a reminder for fans who read the previous releases but also acts as a great way for new readers to catch up with everything. The reveals are for those new readers while acting as a reminder for others. But, those reveals also takes things a bit further than we previously knew.

It’s a solid issue that takes us deeper into the world while also feeling like a continuation of what has already been released. There’s a solid mix of action, mystery, and a little bit of emotions. Williamson and Culver make Jason Todd, aka Red Hood, a little sympathetic in the issue. There are moments I genuinely felt bad for him.

The art by Giannis Milonogiannis is a bit surprising… it’s in black and white! With lettering by Troy Peteri, the comic delivers action with some great sense of motion. There’s something very interesting and different for the issue. It doesn’t feature color, that’s the most obvious, but the “pencils” brings a quality that feels like manga at times. That’s not a bad thing at all as it delivers dynamic moments full of action and excitement. The choice of black and white is interesting as the original Future State’s Gotham was highlighted by its neon colors that lit it up like a futuristic Vegas mixed with Tokyo. Without that, it takes away one of the “characters” that made the original so good.

The issue also features “The Third Mask” by Katsuhiro Otomo. Reprinting the classic story, it’s translated by Jo Duffy and is lettered by Bill Oakley. While there’s aspects I like of the story, it feels a bit choppy in its narrative. There’s some philosophical moments about it that’s really interesting and leaves readers to ponder. Tied into the main story, it makes complete sense as to why it was included. But, the story is 25 years old and its style doesn’t quite hold up. Also in black in white, it’s a compliment to the main story but a flawed one.

Future State: Gotham #1 is a nice start to the return to the future. It’s a world and story that I wanted to see more of. While it doesn’t have the colorful pop of its basis, it brings something new and different as well. It digs its roots into the manga that clearly influenced the previous stories and does it well. Here’s hoping we can get more than this one series exploring this world, there’s that much to dive in to.

Story: Joshua Williamson, Dennis Culver, Katsuhiro Otomo Art: Giannis Milonogiannis, Katsuhiro Otomo
Letterer: Troy Peteri, Bill Oakley Translation: Jo Duffy
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Nuclear Family #3

It’s the tension of the Cold War and then the bombs begin to fall. Nuclear Family #3… yeah that’s not the direction we thought it was going in.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Robin #1

Robin #1

Lets face it, Damian Wayne is a turd. He’s an annoying, bratty, kid. But, when it comes to character growth, he’s a perfect example of what’s possible in comics. Damian when he first appeared was far worse. Over the years, readers have seen him learn real lessons and grow. He’s been a sidekick, a team member, and a leader. Now, he’s going solo in Robin #1 an interesting start of a series with a familiar concept.

Written by Joshua Williamson, Robin #1 sees Damian Wayne go off the grid. We mean really off the grid. So off the grid, the Bat-family can’t find him. He’s on his own searching for the League of Lazarus a mysterious organization who every hundred years hold a tournament of the best fighters in the world. Yes, Robin #1 kicks off the oh-so-familiar tournament angle. But, it’s a tournament to the death!

Yes, Robin #1 is a familiar concept we’ve seen so many times before. But, Williamson does a spectacular job with the story. In particular, it’s the detail and focuses on Damian that stands out. In one issue Williamson shows us the many aspects of the character. He’s arrogant but also a child. He’s a skilled fighter but also has a lot to learn. We see Damian go from knocking out an opponent to reading a manga about art. It’s an interesting juxtaposition that reminds us that in the end, Damian is a kid trying to find his own way. He’s been in the shadow of his parents and his grandfather for so long, it looks like this series will finally allow him to define himself.

The art is pretty good. Gleb Melnikov gives us an issue that looks great technically. The characters and locations all have a style to them that makes you take notice. The colors and everything pops in a good way. It looks good. What it doesn’t do is take advantage of its plot. The two fights presented are rather boring. We don’t get flashy and exciting page layouts or flow, we get pretty standard pages and panels. It doesn’t take advantage of what could be a very visually striking comic. Everything looks good but it’s in a way boring.

The lettering by Troy Peteri stands out a bit as well. There’s some interesting choices in emphasis of lettering at times like when an individual yells “Answer Me!” it’s in a green font with a splash of black. Words here and there are picked out in this way delivering a little bit of a punch to them. It’s a noticeable choice that stands out in a good way.

Robin #1 is a solid start. It’s the attention Williamson gives to its main character that really stands out. While the overall concept is one that’s been done many times before, the focus on Damian and his personality makes this one interesting. This is a series to definitely check out and a character to keep an eye on.

Story: Joshua Williamson Art: Gleb Melnikov Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 8.25 Art: 7.85 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Exclusive Preview: Nuclear Family #3

NUCLEAR FAMILY #3

Writer: Stephanie Phillips 
Artist: Tony Shasteen 
Colorist: JD Mettler 
Letterer: Troy Peteri 
Cover: Tony Shasteen w/ JD Mettler
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 4.28.2021

Surviving a nuclear attack in the 1950s, the McCleans wake to find that the explosions have somehow propelled them into a post-apocalyptic United States that has been moved entirely underground. While the McCleans find a country caught in a never-ending war, they also learn that this new underground society might be willing to go to extreme lengths in order to destroy their enemies. Can the McCleans find a way to return to their own time before it’s too late?

Nuclear Family #3

Review: Nuclear Family #2

It’s the tension of the Cold War and then the bombs begin to fall. Nuclear Family #2 deepens the mystery giving us hints but few answers.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
TFAW

AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Red Atlantis #5

It’s election day and individuals have decided to attack each other for unknown reasons. Was it an attack by a foreign country? Was it something else? Red Atlantis #5 wraps up the series answering a lot of questions but also leaving a lot out there. It’s a bit of a mixed finale for this intriguing series.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Robert Carey
Color: Rosh
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Superman: Red and Blue #1

Superman: Red and Blue #1

I’ll admit it, Superman isn’t the most exciting character to me. I find he’s one that runs hot or cold with little in-between. There’s been great stories and great runs but he’s generally not a character I get excited to read about. But, I love anthologies. So, getting to sit down with Superman: Red and Blue #1 to see what such varied creators would do had me intrigued. And, I was not disappointed. This is another homerun of an anthology for DC Comics, and one the delivers an emotional punch.

Superman: Red and Blue #1 features such varied talent as John Ridley, Brandon Easton, Wes Craig, Dan Watters, and Marguerite Bennett on writing. Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, Jill Thompson, and Dani provide the art. Jordie Bellaire, Ron Chan handle some of the colors, while Dave Sharpe, Clayton Cowles, and Troy Peteri handle the lettering. I wanted to give the creators behind this their due because it’s a hell of an anthology. Every story is fantastic. The art is top-notch. The colors are used amazingly well, and the lettering is tight. This is a comic that knocks it out of the park.

But, what surprised me the most about Superman: Red and Blue #1 is how much it got to me. It’s stories made me think and delivered a bit of a punch. It’s impressive. Really impressive. DC has let their creators do what they do and it appears without fear. The stories range from lessons about childhood friendship, to condemnations of capitalism. There’s a story that tackles the failures of DC’s heroes (like Superman) from stopping the drug trade making them complicit in the deaths due to it. And, there’s a story of inspiration. Each story has highs and lows and are so unique with something to say about the character or what he represents. It’s an inspiring and thought-provoking comic.

Superman: Red and Blue #1 continues DC’s sparsely colored comics focused on red and blue like the title says. There’s also whites, blacks, and some gray thrown in but the various stories look beautiful and varied in their styles. There’s also a brilliant comic focused on colors themselves delivering a dive into what each represents.

The anthology is an inspiring endeavor and sets up such a high bar for what’s to follow. I went in knowing Superman: Red and Blue #1 was full of talent but how daring some of these stories are was not expected. To finish reading some of them a little choked up was

Story: John Ridley, Brandon Easton, Wes Craig, Dan Watters, Marguerite Bennett
Art: Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, Jill Thompson, Dani
Color: Jordie Bellaire, Ron Chan
Letterer: Dave Sharpe, Clayton Cowles, Troy Peteri
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

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