Tag Archives: troy peteri

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal The Multiverse That Laughs #1

Dark Nights: Death Metal The Multiverse Who Laughs

I’ve been vocal in my mixed feelings about Dark Nights: Death Metal. The main event has been mixed in quality and the one-shots, while they used to stand out, are now fumbling themselves. Dark Nights: Death Metal The Multiverse Who Laughs is another stumble presenting four stories with few standing out and most being forgettable.

Dark Nights: Death Metal The Multiverse Who Laughs opens with an introduction introducing the scary stories to follow. Written by Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV, and Joshua Williamson, the intro isn’t so much Cryptkeeper as it’s a tease. Juan Gedeon handles the art, Mike Spicer color, and Troy Peteri the lettering and the art is solidly entertaining. But, the tales the Robin Kings aren’t what’s presented, and sadly what is, is far less interesting. A nice introduction to lay out the concept of the comic but it actually hurts what’s really could have been accomplished with some text on the first page.

Patton Oswalt, Sanford Greene, David Baron, and Josh Reed to a twisted take on Zsasz in “Feeding the Beast”. Sadly, the story itself doesn’t make a whole lot of sense at all. It feels like interesting ideas chopped together without a strong narrative. To say it’s a frustrating start is an understatement and the issue stumbles from there.

The Super-Pets get the spotlight in “The Super-Threats“. Written by Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti, the story is a Super-Pets spin on DCeased. Krypto returns from space to find a planet ravaged and all that remains are the Super-Pets. It’s a nice horror short story packed in well and filled with a little bit of humor to make it different and stand out from DCeased. Chad Hardin‘s art with color by Enrica Eren Angiolini‘s color is solid as the animals are filled with emotion as the story unfolds. There’s a slight coloring issue when one infected creature is described as having yellow eyes and red teeth and neither being present. Lettering by Carlos M. Mangual really stands out with the unique speech bubbles that makes the story really fun.

In “Hard-Traveled“, Earth has been taken over by Hal Jordon who’s used his power to bring order to the planet. Standing in his way is Green Arrow. Saladin Ahmed‘s story is interesting in concept but sadly doesn’t get enough pages to really stand out. But, it’s a comic I’d love to read. What does stand out is Scot Eaton‘s art. With Norm Rapmund on ink and Hi-Fi on color, the story builds to a Rocky vs. Apollo ending.

Much like the story leading into it, “The Fear Index” also suffers from not enough pages. Steel has to deal with a planet that has been enveloped by Scarecrow’s toxin. It’s a great idea that we’re mostly teased with. Written by Brandon Thomas, the story itself is the trailer for a film we want to see more of. The art by Thomas Mandrake is solid. With color by Sian Mandrake, it comes off as the twisted fear-induced visions you’d expect. It’s not the over the top trip that has been done before but it’s presented as unsettled. That’s helped by Deron Bennett‘s lettering which enhances the hallucinations from the fear toxin. It emphasizes the situation and world.

There are some things to like about Dark Nights: Death Metal The Multiverse Who Laughs. The idea of an anthology telling stories in this twisted world has potential but few are given the space they’re needed to really be interesting. Instead, they all fall short as teases for something far more entertaining. Both the Green Arrow and Steel stories are worthy of their own one-shots and an entire line could be done like the other Dark Multiverse one-shots releases. But, as is, there’s not a lot here to get excited about.

Story: Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV, Joshua Williamson, Patton Oswalt, Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, Saladin Ahmed, Brandon Thomas
Art: Juan Gedeon, Sanford Greene, Chad Hardin, Scot Eaton, Thomas Mandrake
Color: Mike Spicer, David Baron, Enrica Eren Angiolini, Sian Mandrake, Hi-Fi
Ink: Norm Rapmund
Letterer: Troy Peteri, Josh Reed, Carlos M. Mangual, Deron Bennett
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Red Hood #51

Red Hood #51

I had given up on Red Hood for a whole host of reasons. With a new creative team and direction, it felt like a good time to explore the series again. Red Hood #51 has Jason Todd returning home to Gotham City. The city is still picking up the pieces after “The Joker War”. Jason finds his old neighborhood has new vigilante protectors. And they’re fighting against those attempting to take advantage of the power vacuum.

Written by Shawn Martinbrough, Red Hood #51 packs a lot into a single issue. That’s to its detriment to an extent as nothing feels like it’s given the depth it’s needed. The comic is broken up into three distinct paths as the narrative jumps around the puzzle pieces.

All the concepts of the comic are generally great, though the end villain feels a bit laughable. The idea of neighbors coming together to protect their area is a solid next step for the Bat line of comics. Jason heading back and trying to figure out his next steps also works. The villains we’re presented feel a little comical. While there’s some things that work, there’s too many moments that come off as jokes that aren’t meant to be jokes.

But, you can see what Martinbrough is going with. Jason Tood, and this Red Hood, is being reshaped to focus on a lower level of villain, a more street level Batman. He’s being shaped into a white Luke Cage, and with that we’ll hopefully get the baggage that can come with that, gentrification being an example.

The art by Tony Akins is pretty solid. Along with Stefano Gaudiano on ink, Paul Mounts‘ colors, and lettering by Troy Peteri we’re presented with a different look at Gotham. It’s an art style that befits the focus and characters of the comic and characters. This isn’t the run down parts of Gotham nor are these the newly built. Red Hood looks like he’ll be straddling the two, an area being worked on that’s been gentrified and continues to be. We see that in the detail of the buildings are neighborhoods presented. The art tells us so much about where Red Hood fits in the Bat-family picture.

The comic isn’t bad but it feels like it attempts to pack too much in. Red Hood #51 has Jason Todd following a new direction and finding a new role for himself. There’s a lot of potential in the comic as to where it can go and the groundwork is laid out here. Unfortunately, none of it is given the time its needed to be really interested. Instead, we get Red Hood in a Luke Cage situation with over the top characters that so far don’t quite feel in place in a Red Hood comic. We’ll see where things go but as a start, this is a mixed one.

Story: Shawn Martinbrough Art: Tony Akins
Ink: Stefano Gaudiano Color: Paul Mounts Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.15 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Exclusive Preview: Red Atlantis #2

Red Atlantis #2

Writer: Stephanie Phillips 
Artist: Robert Carey 
Colorist: Rosh 
Letterer: Troy Peteri 
Cover: Robert Hack 
Incentive Cover: Cliff Richards
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale December 2nd

The Cold War is hot again as Russian sleeper agents with mind-control abilities exploit America’s political divide and sow lethal dissent. Unexpectedly thrown into this world of science-fiction espionage, Miriam Roberts is left to question her government’s motives and even her own identity.

Red Atlantis #2

Be a Part of the Nuclear Family in February 2021 with Stephanie Phillips, Tony Shasteen, JD Mettler, and Troy Peteri

AfterShock Comics has announced a new comic series, Nuclear Family from writer Stephanie Phillips, artist Tony Shasteen, colorist JD Mettler, and letterer Troy Peteri. This is the fourth series between the publisher and Phillips. The series is based on Philip K. Dick’s short story Breakfast at Twilight.

America, 1957. Elvis dominates the airwaves and apple pie is served after every meal. But, with the dark cloud of nuclear holocaust looming, Korean War vet Tim McClean’s major concern is taking care of his family in the atomic age.

When the first bomb does drop on an unexpecting Midwest city, Tim and his family find
themselves plunged into a strange new world, where what’s left of the Unites States has gone underground while continuing to wage war on Russia with unthinkable tactics.

Nuclear Family #1 is out February 24, 2021, with a main cover by Shasteen and Mettler and an incentive cover by Tony Harris.

Nuclear Family #1

Review: Red Atlantis #1

It’s election day and individuals have decided to attack each other for unknown reasons. Was it an attack by a foreign country? Was it something else? Red Atlantis #1 kicks off what feels like an X-Files like mystery.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Robert Carey
Color: Rosh
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush

Tales from the Dark Multiverse Batman Hush

I love “what if” type comics. They’re simple in concept as they take a minor detail about a comic character and spin a whole new story and world out of it. It takes the familiar and makes something new and different. DC ComicsTales from the Dark Multiverse is a new take on that concept. Each one-shot takes a major storyline and delivers a new twist on them from the perspective of the Dark Multiverse. We know it’ll be a twisted tale, not necessarily tragic, but definitely, not a story that’ll leave up uplifted by the end. Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush gives us a new spin on the modern “classic,” Batman: Hush.

In this twisted tale, after the murder of Bruce’s parents, he goes off to live with his best friend, Tommy Elliot’s family. There is no Alfred Pennyworth to raise him. Instead, Bruce deals with the trauma of the murder of his parents devolving into madness that has him winding up in Arkham Asylum.

What’s impressive about Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush is how much of a world is fleshed out. Writer Phillip Kennedy Johnson could easily have focused on a story of revenge. Instead, there’s so much more. Gotham is an independent city-state with its own leadership and different place in the world. This isn’t the Gotham we normally know, instead, it’s a micro-state which allows for greater political intrigue and machinations. Johnson gives us much more than Batman just delivering justice but instead a Shakespearean tale of power, betrayal, and backstabbing action. There’s a lot of thought put into the world here and it’s the amount of detail that makes it really stand out.

Dexter Soy and Sergio Davila provide the art for the issue giving us a not quite horror style. The world and city feels like a land in battle. But, there’s a being that looms over it all, stalking and terrorizing individuals. Matt Santorelli provides the ink, Ivan Plascencia the color, and Troy Peteri the lettering. The style and the look of the world has detail about it that matches Johnson’s story.

The design of characters, locations, and vehicles have a well thought out aspect about them as if there was actual discussion about how this world operates. The haves are clearly delineated from the have nots in style and that extends to the detail of their location. The vehicles and weapons all have a utility about them as if they have an actual use in this world and it’s not just to look cool. Helicopter like transportation shuffles the wealthy across the skyline above those they rule below as an example.

Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush is a story of detail. It absolutely could have used more pages for that. The history and training about this version of Batman is a little thin though his motivation is clear. It’s something I’d like to see more of. There’s a lot packed in here though as Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush is a one-shot comic you can just pick up and enjoy and ponder so much about this intriguing spin on a familiar world.

Story: Phillip Kennedy Johnson Art: Dexter Soy, Sergio Davila
Ink: Matt Santorelli Color: Ivan Plascencia Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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DC Reveals Whistle: A New Gotham City Hero from E. Lockhart and Manuel Preitano

Whistle: A New Gotham City Hero

DC Comics has unveiled the cover and new details for Whistle: A New Gotham City Hero from acclaimed young adult (YA) novelist E. Lockhart and illustrator Manuel PreitanoThe upcoming YA graphic novel debuts an original superhero with an ulti-“mutt” set of abilities and is a moving coming-of-age tale about perseverance, heroism, and finding your voice to make a change in your community. Joining Preitano on art is color from Gabby Metzler and lettering from Troy Peteri.

Set in a reimagined Gotham City, Whistle follows 16-year-old Willow Zimmerman as she struggles to make ends meet during her mother’s cancer treatments. A series of odd jobs leads to a life-altering accident that leaves Willow with a “sixth sense” that is as much a blessing as a curse.

Sixteen-year-old Willow Zimmerman has something to say. When she’s not on the streets advocating for her community, she’s volunteering at the local pet shelter. She seeks to help all those in need, even the stray dog she’s named Lebowitz that follows her around. But as much as she does for the world around her, she struggles closer to home—taking care of her mother, recently diagnosed with cancer. Her job as an adjunct professor of Jewish studies does not provide adequate health insurance—and Willow can see that time is running out. 

When in desperation she reconnects with her estranged “uncle” Edward, he opens the door to an easier life. Through simple jobs, such as hosting his private poker nights with Gotham City’s elites, she is able to keep her family afloat—and afford critical medical treatments for her mother. 

Willow’s family life quickly improves through the income provided by these jobs, but it comes at the cost of distancing herself from the people she truly cares about. Her time is now spent on new connections, such as biologist and teacher Pammie Isley. And when Willow and Lebowitz collide with the monstrous Killer Croc outside the local synagogue, they are both injured, only to wake up being able to understand each other. And there are other developments, too…strange ways in which they’ve become stronger together. Willow’s activism kicks into high gear—with these powers, she can really save the world!

But when Willow discovers that Edward and his friends are actually some of Gotham’s most corrupt criminals, she must make a choice: remain loyal to the man who kept her family together, or use her new powers to be a voice for her community.

Whistle: A New Gotham City Hero is available to preorder now and will hit stores and online retailers everywhere books are sold on May 11, 2021.

Review: Artemis and the Assassin #5

A time-travel action adventure as an assassin from the future must kill a woman from the past. Artemis & The Assassin #5 wraps up the series, but does it stick the landing or does it get lost in its concept? Find out!

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Francesca Fantini
Color: Lauren Affe
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Artemis and the Assassin #5

Artemis and the Assassin #5

Writer: Stephanie Phillips 
Artists: Francesca Fantini 
Colorist: Lauren Affe 
Letterer: Troy Peteri 
Cover: Phil Hester w/ Mark Englert
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 9.30.2020

Hurtling through historical eras, time-traveling killer Maya and World War II spy Virginia can only survive if they work together. But as assassins close in, is Maya willing to turn her back on the only life she’s ever known? 

Artemis and the Assassin #5

Preview: Devil Within

Devil Within

Cover: Tula Lotay
Writer: Stephanie Phillips / Artist: Maan House / Colorist: Dee Cunniffe / Letterer: Troy Peteri
Mature / $16.99 / 100 pages

Paranormal entities. Demonic possessions. Or is it madness? When newly engaged Michelle and Samantha move into an old house, Michelle starts experiencing disturbing events… rogue reflections in mirrors, strange apparitions, and an eerie voice only she can hear. Samantha doesn’t believe in ghosts, but the alternative might be even more terrifying in this hauntingly paranoid thriller from writer Stephanie Phillips (Butcher of Paris) and artist Mann House (Witchblade).

Devil Within
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