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Exclusive Preview: Nuclear Family #3

NUCLEAR FAMILY #3

Writer: Stephanie Phillips 
Artist: Tony Shasteen 
Colorist: JD Mettler 
Letterer: Troy Peteri 
Cover: Tony Shasteen w/ JD Mettler
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 4.28.2021

Surviving a nuclear attack in the 1950s, the McCleans wake to find that the explosions have somehow propelled them into a post-apocalyptic United States that has been moved entirely underground. While the McCleans find a country caught in a never-ending war, they also learn that this new underground society might be willing to go to extreme lengths in order to destroy their enemies. Can the McCleans find a way to return to their own time before it’s too late?

Nuclear Family #3

Review: Nuclear Family #2

It’s the tension of the Cold War and then the bombs begin to fall. Nuclear Family #2 deepens the mystery giving us hints but few answers.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
TFAW

AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Red Atlantis #5

It’s election day and individuals have decided to attack each other for unknown reasons. Was it an attack by a foreign country? Was it something else? Red Atlantis #5 wraps up the series answering a lot of questions but also leaving a lot out there. It’s a bit of a mixed finale for this intriguing series.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Robert Carey
Color: Rosh
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Superman: Red and Blue #1

Superman: Red and Blue #1

I’ll admit it, Superman isn’t the most exciting character to me. I find he’s one that runs hot or cold with little in-between. There’s been great stories and great runs but he’s generally not a character I get excited to read about. But, I love anthologies. So, getting to sit down with Superman: Red and Blue #1 to see what such varied creators would do had me intrigued. And, I was not disappointed. This is another homerun of an anthology for DC Comics, and one the delivers an emotional punch.

Superman: Red and Blue #1 features such varied talent as John Ridley, Brandon Easton, Wes Craig, Dan Watters, and Marguerite Bennett on writing. Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, Jill Thompson, and Dani provide the art. Jordie Bellaire, Ron Chan handle some of the colors, while Dave Sharpe, Clayton Cowles, and Troy Peteri handle the lettering. I wanted to give the creators behind this their due because it’s a hell of an anthology. Every story is fantastic. The art is top-notch. The colors are used amazingly well, and the lettering is tight. This is a comic that knocks it out of the park.

But, what surprised me the most about Superman: Red and Blue #1 is how much it got to me. It’s stories made me think and delivered a bit of a punch. It’s impressive. Really impressive. DC has let their creators do what they do and it appears without fear. The stories range from lessons about childhood friendship, to condemnations of capitalism. There’s a story that tackles the failures of DC’s heroes (like Superman) from stopping the drug trade making them complicit in the deaths due to it. And, there’s a story of inspiration. Each story has highs and lows and are so unique with something to say about the character or what he represents. It’s an inspiring and thought-provoking comic.

Superman: Red and Blue #1 continues DC’s sparsely colored comics focused on red and blue like the title says. There’s also whites, blacks, and some gray thrown in but the various stories look beautiful and varied in their styles. There’s also a brilliant comic focused on colors themselves delivering a dive into what each represents.

The anthology is an inspiring endeavor and sets up such a high bar for what’s to follow. I went in knowing Superman: Red and Blue #1 was full of talent but how daring some of these stories are was not expected. To finish reading some of them a little choked up was

Story: John Ridley, Brandon Easton, Wes Craig, Dan Watters, Marguerite Bennett
Art: Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, Jill Thompson, Dani
Color: Jordie Bellaire, Ron Chan
Letterer: Dave Sharpe, Clayton Cowles, Troy Peteri
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Infinite Frontier #0

Infinite Frontier #0

Dark Knights: Death Metal is over and we’ve seen a possible future timeline in “Future State”. Now, DC begins to chart its path with the first crumbs teased in Infinite Frontier #0. The issue serves as a guide as to the various series and status-quo that awaits them. With a new omniverse to explore, anything is possible and the comic does its job to remind us of that.

The comic’s story is delivered in a narrative driven by two characters as our guide. It’s a spin on the classic Christmas Carol and It’s a Wonderful Life. Wonder Woman believes a threat is looming and wants to witness the state of things before making a major decision about her role in the DC Universe.

With Wonder Woman and Spectre as our guide, we’re taken on a tour of the characters highlighting the comics to come. The Justice League, Batman, Wonder Girl, Alan Scott, Teen Titans Academy, Superman, Green Arrow and Black Canary, Star Girl, Green Lanterns, and the Flash all get a moment to show off where things stand. All of it is good and interesting though few of what’s presented really excites. It feels like an extended teaser and preview. It takes its concept as a guidebook almost too seriously. The comic feels a bit more like the extension of the ending of Dark Knights: Death Metal where we saw many of these ideas initially teased.

Infinite Frontier #0 credits

But, what’s intriguing is what’s presented and doesn’t have a comic attached to them. Infinite Frontier #0 teases more than what’s already announced giving hope as to what we’ll see in July and beyond. There’s also teases through artwork of the various series DC teased at the recent ComicsPro. It’s interesting in that way that the stories feel less like the exciting first 15 minutes before the credits to get you pumped. Instead, the stories are a bit dry and more to lay out where things stand with the concepts thrown out being the hooks. The action isn’t the hook, the ideas are.

The art of the comic is solid. Each segment flows into the next and with a few exceptions, the styles work well together. There are some fantastic spreads with Wonder Woman as she talks to Spectre about what she’s witnessing. There’s a few panels and pages that’ll leave you lingering to stare at. The colors really pop on pages delivering a sense of energy that really fits the new status of the DC Universe.

Infinite Frontier #0 isn’t bad but it doesn’t quite excite. By the end of the issue I found myself more excited about concepts than the comics themselves. Very few of the segments left me wanting to immediately find out what happens next. Instead, it the comic feels like a short ashcan, teasing what’s to come with a few pages and back material to fill things out. It shows what’s to come but it never quite puts things over. Instead, it nails its role as a guide, a way to browse what DC has to offer.

Story: Brian Michael Bendis, James Tynion IV, Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad, Joëlle Jones, Tim Sheridan, Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Joshua Williamson, Geoff Johns, Geoffrey Thorne
Art: David Marquez, Jorge Jimeez, Alitha Martinez, Mark Morales, Joëlle Jones, Stephen Byrne, Rafa Sandoval, Jordi Tarragona, Jamal Igle, Alex Maleev, Todd Nauck, Dexter Soy, Howard Porter, John Romita, Jr., Klaus Janson
Color: Tamra Bonvillain, Tomeu Morey, Emilio Lopez, Jordie Bellaire, Stephen Byrne, Alejandro Sanchez, Hi-Fi, Alex Sinclair, Brad Anderson
Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Nuclear Family #1

It’s the tension of the Cold War and then the bombs begin to fall. Nuclear Family #1 kicks off an interesting alternate history.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Tony Shasteen
Color: JD Mettler
Letterer: Troy Peteri
Backmatter design: Charles Pritchett

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Red Atlantis #4

It’s election day and individuals have decided to attack each other for unknown reasons. Was it an attack by a foreign country? Was it something else? Red Atlantis #4 delivers the first real showdown between Miriam, Sasha, and who might be behind the attacks.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Robert Carey
Color: Rosh
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Future State: Harley Quinn #2

Future State: Harley Quinn #2

The debut of Future State: Harley Quinn is a comic that caught me off guard. It used Harley’s background in a take on Silence of the Lambs in this new Gotham. Future State: Harley Quinn #2 wraps up the story in a nice two-issue twist that leaves us wanting more.

In this future Gotham, the Magistrate has outlawed masks hunting down some of the biggest names. Black Mask is still out there and Harley is in prison and being used to try to capture him. Playing Clarice to Harley’s Lecter is Jonathan Crane, aka Scarecrow.

Written by Stephanie Phillips, Future State: Harley Quinn #2 is an interesting take on the character playing off of her smarts more than her wackiness. It’s a Harley I like a lot more making her more than a comedic foil. While the exact details about Crane and Black Mask don’t get too far into the weeds, what’s presented is really interesting. We get to see Harley as she works the system to get her out of the mess she’s in. Black Mask is really a “fill in the slot” role whose more of a means to tell the story Phillips wants to tell. That’s the back and forth between Harley and Crane of who’s smarter.

This is a world and series I want to see more of. The concept of Crane having gone legit and working for the Magistrate is intriguing and something I want to see more of. But, it’s the dance with Harley that’s really intriguing. It’s a more cerebral superhero comic with Harley giving just enough to meet her goals. But, also staying a few steps ahead of Crane.

The art continues its anime inspired and neon infused visuals. Simone DiMeo and Toni Infante team up with Tamra Bonvillain on color and Troy Peteri on lettering. The future Gotham plays well to Harley’s visuals highlighting her bright colors and look. The neon really makes the character pop and though the story is “dark” overall, taking place at night, the art and color still feel bright with a visual punch. There’s a solid visual punch to it all that really plays to all of the strengths of the story and character. Black Mask, Scarecrow, and Harley all look solid with a slight anime look to them all but not quite fully diving into that style.

Future State: Harley Quinn #2 is a great second issue that wraps up the story quite nicely. It’s a solid read that builds upon this new Gotham nicely. It’s nice to see a story more focused on Harley’s smarts and background in psychology than just her goofy sense. The comic still delivers some solid humor despite the setting and world bringing the laughs and leaving us wanting more.

Story: Stephanie Phillips Art: Simone DiMeo, Toni Infante
Color: Tamra Bonvillain Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Red Atlantis #3

It’s election day and individuals have decided to attack each other for unknown reasons. Was it an attack by a foreign country? Was it something else? Red Atlantis #3 gives us more information as to what’s going as well as teases the main villain.

Story: Stephanie Phillips
Art: Robert Carey
Color: Rosh
Letterer: Troy Peteri

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Future State: Harley Quinn #1

Future State: Harley Quinn #1

Future State: Harley Quinn #1 is the first comic I read as part of DC’s Future State and if it’s any indication, we’re in for a treat of two months. With the multiverse saved in Dark Nights: Death Metal and a world of possibility now open, DC has taken that opportunity to take two months to tell stories about possible futures. New creative teams with new concepts breathing some fresh air into a line that has been all over the place.

In this future Gotham, The Magistrate has come in getting rid of Batman and the outlawing of “masks”. A high-tech police state, the world feels like the futuristic takes we’ve seen in so many anime, neon yet dark.

Writer Stephanie Phillips delivers a very interesting start of things in Future State: Harley Quinn #1. Harley has been captured by a reformed Jonathan Crane, aka Scarecrow. Instead of being executed, she’s tasked with providing her expertise and knowledge in how to capture other villains still loose in the city. It’s a spin on a concept we’ve seen so many times before and near perfected in Silence of the Lambs. Harley plays Hannibal Lector’s role to Crane’s Clarice.

It’s a very interesting spin on the character and one we’ve only seen here and there. Phillips lays heavily into Quinn’s previous experience working with inmates in Arkham and that expertise is what’s on display. It’s a welcome change to the dynamic moving away from the wacky jokes and off the wall energy and instead giving us something familiar but new. This Harley still makes cracks and goes on tangents but is less of a Looney Tunes character. It’s one I personally enjoy reading a lot more and hopefully this is what we can expect when her regular series returns.

Phillips also really digs into the drive of some of Batman’s rogue gallery. It’s something that’s not explored enough and to see this solution of dealing with them makes you question what’s been done before. Harley points out what’s driving these villains and uses it against them to capture them.

The art by Simone Demeo, colorist Tamra Bonvillain, and letterer Troy Peteri pops. As I described above, the style reminds me much more of manga and anime with brighter colors highlighted by pinks, purples, blues, and reds. There’s a dayglow aspect about it all that catches the eye as it looks so different than what DC regularly publishes. The character designs too are fantastic with an animated/anime style about them. It’s visually fantastic to go along with a solid story.

Future State: Harley Quinn #1 is a hell of a start and I world I want to see more of. There’s so much teased and hinted at, I want more! Two issues are not enough! The look and story are fantastic and such a change from what we’ve seen so often with the character. While some aspects are familiar and been done, the overall package is fresh and new. It’s a fantastic comic with Harley Quinn and that’s coming from someone who’s not the biggest fan of the character. If I’m recommending it, it’s a solid buy.

Story: Stephanie Phillips Art: Simone Dimeo
Color: Tamra Bonvillain Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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