Tag Archives: steve ditko

More Variant Covers Revealed For Marvel Comics #1000!

In celebration of Marvel‘s 80th anniversary this year, scores of comic creators – some Marvel icons, some first-timers – are assembling for an epic comic book story in honor of the very first issue of Marvel Comics. This August, get ready for Marvel Comics #1000, a massive collaborative effort that will see 80 different creative teams weave together one, expansive story.

In honor of an 80-year legacy, we’re proud to present an incredible lineup of variants, all by an exceptional roster of artists, that exemplify the richness and scope of Marvel history. Collect these iconic covers soon!

MARVEL COMICS #1000:

MARVEL COMICS 1000 40’S VARIANT COVER BY MARK BROOKS (JUN190850)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 60’S VARIANT COVER BY MIKE ALLRED (JUN190851)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 70’S VARIANT COVER BY GREG SMALLWOOD (JUN190852)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 90’S VARIANT COVER BY RON LIM (JUN190854)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 00’S VARIANT COVER BY MARK BAGLEY (JUN190855)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 DECADE VARIANT COVER BY KAARE ANDREWS (JUN190856)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY JEN BARTEL (JUN190858)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY CLAYTON CRAIN (JUN190857)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY GABRIELE DELL’OTTO (JUN190845)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 VIRGIN VARIANT COVER BY GABRIELE DELL’OTTO (MAY198761)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 HIDDEN GEM VARIANT COVER BY STEVE DITKO (JUN190862)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 COLLAGE VARIANT COVER BY MR GARCIN (JUN190849)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY GREG HILDEBRANDT (JUN190860)

MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY INHYUK LEE (JUN190846)

  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 80’S VARIANT COVER BY JULIAN TOTINO TEDESCO (JUN190853)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY J. SCOTT CAMPBELL (JUN190847)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 VIRGIN VARIANT COVER BY J. SCOTT CAMPBELL (MAY198819)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY ED MCGUINNESS (JUN190848)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 HIDDEN GEM VARIANT COVER BY GEORGE PEREZ (JUN190861)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 WRAPAROUND VARIANT COVER BY JOE QUESADA (JUN190843)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 BLACK AND WHITE WRAPAROUND VARIANT COVER BY JOE QUESADA (JUN190844)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 VARIANT COVER BY SKOTTIE YOUNG (JUN190859)
  • MARVEL COMICS 1000 BLANK VARIANT COVER (JUN190863)

Amazing Spider-Man #25 Marks Year Two of Spencer, Ottley & Ramos’ Run

It may be hitting comic shops next month, but the buzz is already on for the giant-sized main story in Amazing Spider-Man #25, where the bandaged villain who has been on the periphery since #1 strikes at last! But this mysterious figure isn’t the only menace after the Wall-Crawler: Spider-Man and Mary Jane find themselves in an incredibly tough situation, thanks to Electro. Can Spider-Man save MJ? Can MJ save Spider-Man? Plus, what is Mysterio cooking?

For what will be an unforgettable issue, Marvel has rolled out a lineup of iconic variants, all by premiere Marvel talent. Get a sneak peek at this amazing slate!

Amazing Spider-Man #25 is written by Nick Spencer and features art by Dan Hipp, Ryan Ottley, and Kev Walker, with colors by Nathan Fairbairn and a main cover by Ottley.

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 BLANK VARIANT (MAY190824)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 STEVE DITKO HIDDEN GEM VARIANT (MAY190818)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 STEVE DITKO HIDDEN GEM VARIANT (MAY190818)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 DAN HIPP VARIANT (MAY190819)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 DAN HIPP VARIANT (MAY190819)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 TODD NAUCK CARNAGE-IZED VARIANT (MAY190822)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 TODD NAUCK CARNAGE-IZED VARIANT (MAY190822)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 POP CHART VARIANT (MAY190823)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 POP CHART VARIANT (MAY190823)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 WALTER SIMONSON VARIANT (MAY190816)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 WALTER SIMONSON VARIANT (MAY190816)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 GREG SMALLWOOD VARIANT (MAY190817)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 GREG SMALLWOOD VARIANT (MAY190817)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 PAT GLEASON VARIANT (MAY190820)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 PAT GLEASON VARIANT (MAY190820)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 STEGMAN VARIANT (MAY190821)

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 25 STEGMAN VARIANT (MAY190821)

Preview: Ditko’s Monsters

Ditko’s Monsters

Joe Gill (w) • Steve Ditko (a & c)

Two “famous monsters of filmland” battle for your hearts and minds in this terror-ific comic! Gorgo and Konga’s best individual stories! They don’t go head to claw, they’re busy fighting commies, but they battle for your mind as you decide who is the coolest of the cool! Plus, two covers using Flipism technology: one on the front, another on the back! And wait till you see the flipped-out centerfold!

FC • 96 pages • $9.99

Yoe Books Launches Marvel Hardcover Program

IDW Publishing and Yoe Books have announced a new line of Marvel Comics collections, a sensational series of large-format hardcovers curating the finest artwork from the Golden Age’s four-color foundations all the way up to the Marvel Age’s dizzying heights!

Coinciding with the year-long celebration of Marvel’s 80 years of publishing, Yoe Books will debut their retrospective look at the House of Ideas with Marvel Masterwork Pin-Ups, which will be followed by additional entries in 2019.

In Marvel Masterwork Pin-Ups, the pulsating pin-up artwork of legendary Silver Age creators – including Jack KirbySteve DitkoJim SterankoDon HeckJohn ByrneBarry Windsor-SmithJohn SeverinWally WoodDan DecarloJohn Romita, and many more – is collected for the first time ever into a single volume, accompanied throughout with witty wordage, pulse-pounding patter, and zany zingers by Stan “The Man” Lee!

Fans will treasure large, deftly drawn pin-ups by these marvelous artists of Spider-ManThorDoctor StrangeCaptain MarvelThe HulkThe X-Men, the Fantastic Four, and many more, plus nefarious villains led by Doctor Doom – and even Millie the Model by Dan DeCarlo!

Marvel Masterwork Pin-Ups

Preview: The Unknown Anti-War Comics!

The Unknown Anti-War Comics!

Craig Yoe (Editor) • Steve Ditko, Pete Morisi, & Various (a) Steve Ditko (c)

An action-oriented medium, comics have long used wars—real and fictional—as narrative fodder. Now, discover the secret, surprising history of anti-war comics with this marvelously curated collection.

A few comics of the time portrayed the horrors of war, but no blatantly anti-war stories were known to exist—until now! Buried in rare comics published during the Cold War were powerful war, fantasy, and sci-fi stories that strongly condemned war and the bomb, boldly calling for peace.

HC • FC • $29.99 • 224 pages • 7-9/16” x 10-7/16” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-178-6

The Unknown Anti-War Comics!

The Unknown Anti-War Comics, Out this January

The world is now marking the 100th anniversary of the Armistice of World War I, “The War to End All Wars” that brought the cry, “Never Again!” Nearly four decades later, Never Again was a rare two-issue anti-war comic book with a host – a WWI doughboy referred to as The Unknown Soldier – who told gripping war stories with a strong anti-war stance.

The comics from Never Again and other arcane historical comic book sources are carefully restored and showcased in an important new book, The Unknown Anti-War Comics. An action-oriented medium, comics have long used wars – real and fictional – as narrative fodder, often with a strong message attached. Buried in the comics published during the Cold War were powerful combat, fantasy, and sci-fi stories that strongly condemned war and nuclear weapons, boldly calling for peace.

The Unknown Anti-War Comics features the art of Steve Ditko and leads off with two noteworthy introductions. The first introduction is a comic story created especially for the collection by Nate Powell, artist of the National Book Award-Winning March books about Civil Rights leader John Lewis. The second introduction is by Noel Paul Stookey, activist and singer/songwriter of Peter, Paul, and Mary fame.

The 224-page book’s artful advocacy of peace is as important as ever in a world still embroiled in war.

The Unknown Anti-War Comics is edited by Craig Yoe, multiple Eisner Award winner, Mobius winner, and recipient of the Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators. Now available for pre-order via online booksellers and comic book specialty retailers, The Unknown Anti-War Comics is slated for release in January.

Steve Ditko Has Died at age 90

Legendary comic creator Steve Ditko was found dead in his apartment on June 29th, believe to have passed two days earlier. He was age 90.

Stephen J. Ditko was born in Johnstwon, Pennsylvania on November 2, 1927 developing his love of comics from his father. He served in the army after graduating high school. He was stationed in post-war Germany where he drew for the military paper. He moved to New York City in 1950 where he studied under Batman artist Jerry Robinson at the Cartoonists and Illustrators School. He began his comic career in 1953 working at the studio of Joe Simon and Jack Kirby and began working for Marvel in 1955.

Ditko is one of the great creators having created Spider-Man with Stan Lee in 1961. The look of the character, the costume, web shooters, colors, that was all Ditko. His run on the character lasted to issue 38 and he received a plot credit in addition to his artistic credit starting with issue 25.

Spider-Man wasn’t the only famous Ditko creation. He also created Doctor Strange in 1963.

He eventually left Marvel over a dispute and went on to work with Charlton, DC Comics but returned where we worked on Machine Man, Micronauts, and created Squirrel Girl in 1992.

The creator as reclusive, rarely speaking on the record and declining most of his interview requests.

Underrated: Creators Of Yesteryear I

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Creators Of Yesteryear I.



This week I wanted to take a step away from sales numbers, movies, and comics (for the most part), and instead look at some of the creators who had a huge hand in shaping the industry as we know it today. These are names that, hopefully, you already know, but to the average non-comics fan these names may be met with a bit of a shrug or a blank face. The word underrated isn’t a strong enough word for the recognition that these creators should receive from the wider world, but that’s the name of this column… so there we go.

Before I start, one disclaimer: this is in no way shape or form a complete list, hence the Roman numeral at the end of the title. There will be multiple parts to this list in the future in unscheduled installments. Do not expect extensive biographies here, this is just enough to (hopefully) encourage you to do a bit of extra reading yourself.

Shall we get to it?

simon and kirby.jpg

Joe Simon and Jack Kirby

Jack Kirby
I bet you weren’t expecting to see this name here, were you? Jack Kirby is one of the more famous names within the comic book industry, and his contributions to the medium we know and love are legendary. His influence can be felt in just about every issue, so why have I included him on this list? Because if you ask the general public who created the X-Men they’d only answer one name, and Jack Kirby deserves to be as revered, if not more so, than Stan Lee. 

Joe Simon
You’ve heard of Captain America, right? Who hasn’t, really. Well as I’m sure you know he’s the product of Simon and Kirby. The team also created the romance comics genre, and contributed killer runs on some of Marvel and DC’s biggest comics during the middle of the last century. Joe Simon’s comics resume may not be as extensive as his frequent collaborator, but Simon is also the founder of SickMad magazine competitor. He also worked

bill finger

One of the rare photos of Bill Finger

extensively in advertising, serving as the art director for Burstein, Phillips and Newman from 1964 to 1967. There’s an excellent coffee table book featuring the work of the Simon Kirby Studio that I can’t recommend highly enough to you.

 Bill Finger
I swear to the gods if you don’t know who this man is, and what he’s done, then I will happily sit down and tell you all about it – but not here. Suffice it to say Bill Finger gave the world almost everything we know about Batman… and only recently received credit for his work in co-creating Batman. There’s a fantastic documentary on Hulu if you’re interested in learning more about this man.

steve ditko.PNG Steve Ditko
So who created Spider-Man? Not just Stan Lee. Steve Ditko is the co-creator of Marvel’s most bankable star, but there’s a good chance your non comics people wouldn’t know that. The artist also created or co-created a good number of other characters for Marvel and DC including Doctor Strange, The Question, the Creeper, and a revamp of Blue Beetle. Ditko has famously refused almost all interview requests since the 60’s, allowing his work to speak for itself. His Wikipedia entry is full of interesting tidbits.

 Jerry Robinson
The co-creator of Robin and the Joker (Bill Finger was the other half of the writer/artist duo), Jerry Robinson, along with Neal Adams, was also instrumental in the fight for creators rights in the 70’s, but his proudest body of work wasn’t in a traditional comic, accoding to an interview with the Daily Telegraph: “I did 32 years of political cartoons, one every day for six days a week. That body of work is the one I’m proudest of. While my time on Batman was important and exciting and notable considering the characters that came out of it, it was really just the start of my life.”jerry robinson.jpg


 

Like I said above, there is no way that this is an inclusive list. This is merely a column that will hopefully get you, dear reader, talking about thee creators to non comics people.

In the meantime, I’ll see you next week.

 

All images were found via Google search and snipped from the image results.

A People’s History of the Marvel Universe, Week 10: The Mutant Metaphor (Part II)

Last time, I talked about the “protean” nature of the “mutant metaphor,” its roots in science-fiction of the time, and how at least initially there was relatively little mention of mutant identity and anti-mutant prejudice.

Speaking of which, one of the curious things about the original run of X-Men, especially from the “mutant metaphor” angle, is that their mission to “protect a world that hates and fears them” means that the X-Men spent a lot more time fighting “evil mutants” (more on this next week) than defending mutants against those who “hate and fear them.” However, the major exception to this rule in the Lee/Kirby era, the one place where the X-Men confronted anti-mutant prejudice head-on, was the Sentinels:

Even when it was discussed, the “mutant metaphor” tended to be mostly back-material in the original run of X-Men. Issue #14 was an exception, where the metaphor took center stage: the issue opens with a startling revelation, as the existence of mutants shifts from urban legend and occasional siting to public knowledge as Bolivar Trask outs all of homo superior:

There’s a lot to unpack here: first, I find it curious that an anthropologist (as opposed to a geneticist or a demographer or what have you) is making this announcement, and curiouser still that an anthropologist somehow developed the advanced expertise in mechanical engineering and robotics necessary to build the Sentinels. (A clear case of the Omnidisciplinary Scientist there…) Second, as I discussed last week, the allusions here to the Cold War are much stronger than to the Civil Rights Movement – Trask namechecks “cold wars, hot wars, atom bombs and the like” (more on this next week), rather than “states’ rights, outside agitators, forced integration, etc.” Even more so than last week, the emphasis is on the mutant as Fifth Columnist – there is a resonance here between Trask’s seemingly unsupported claims that “mutants walk among us” and Joe McCarthy’s dramatic but numerally vague claims about Communist infiltration of the U.S government. The headlines that blare “Mutant Menace” could equally read “Red Menace,” suggesting a critique of a mass media more interested in shock and sensation than careful investigative reporting. Third, Trask introduces a new theme when it comes to the “mutant metaphor” – the idea of an inevitable unavoidable conflict between mutants and humans – which will continue throughout the original appearances of the Sentinels and will be continued in the Claremont run. The now famous invocation of Neanderthal and Homo Sapiens, in all its archaeological anthropological inaccuracy, has yet to appear, but you can see some of the origins of the idea here.

No matter how you analyze it,Trask’s press conference accomplishes something pretty unusual in Marvel Comics history – it gets Professor Xavier to actually engage in mutant rights politics. As I’ll discuss more next week, one of the problems with the version of the “mutant metaphor” that sees Professor X. as a Martin Luther King Jr. is that Professor X doesn’t spend that much time doing social movement work – preferring instead to train teenage mutants to act as a paramilitary force that engages in an oddly liberal version of the anarchist practice of propaganda of the deed. But here, Bolivar Trask’s call to smash the “mutant menace” drives him to action:

To begin with, given the many well-founded critiques of Silver Age Xavier’s character, it is interesting that Trask’s press conference strikes an instant nerve – clearly Charles has been waiting for the day that mutants are out for some time, and for all that he may disagree with Magneto about the possibility of human-mutant coexistence, it’s interesting that he expects this revelation to lead to a “witch hunt for mutants” and the “wheels of persecution” beginning to grind, without his intervention. And speaking of the sci-fi roots of the “mutant metaphor,” the page to our left really makes this clear with the “artist’s interpretation” of Trask’s remarks. Big-headed widows-peaked aliens wielding the whip over human slaves, being carried through futuristic cities in palanquins, and re-enacting the gladiatorial combat of the Roman Coliseum – this dystopia owes far more to Buck Rogers, Flash Gordon, and John Carter of Mars than it does the racist paranoid imaginary of the 1950s and 1960s.

However, it is the theory of politics here that I am primarily interested in, because Xavier here is depicted as practicing politics in an extremely establishment fashion. Rather than engaging in public protest, direct action, or a media campaign, Xavier’s understanding of politics begins and ends with a “public televised debate” between two academics. And indeed, in both appearance and his debating style, Professor X resembles nothing so much as the arid intellectualism of Adlai Stephenson-era liberalism. Acting (somehow) as the “spokesman for America’s intellectual community,” Xavier’s argument is pitched less on terms of human rights or moral calls or the Constitution than a general statement about the dangers of “ignorance” and “unreasoning fear.” (There might be a link here to Gunnar Myrdal’s famous description of American racism as a mental pathology, but it’s a stretch.)

On the other hand, it’s hard to make a judgement about depiction vs. endorsement – Lee and Kirby show American families at home and the American public on the street outside the storefront window reacting unfavorably – questioning whether Xavier is a mutant, dismissing the “egg-headed old stuffed-shirt,” angrily resentful that one of their children might be a mutant or that they might be ignorant. (It is interesting, however, that they can’t make up their minds as to whether he’s a “communist” or a “right-winger”- possibly a sign that Lee and Kirby were trying to straddle political divides there.)

By contrast, Trask is all emotion and ad-hominem attack, especially in his McCarthyesque (if true) insinuation that “perhaps the professor has an ulterior motive for his defense of mutants.” On a far more important point, Trask has no intent of having the issue be decided by the political system – well before the debate, Trask has clearly decided that “whether I win or lose this debate does not matter,” because he’s going to use his robots to squish his opponent. Thus, the Sentinels:

In classic sci-fi fashion, Trask’s robotic creations turn on their creator the first time they are used, because you don’t mess with the Frankenstein formula. And so, the threat of mutant superiority is trumped by the rise of the machine: as with other stories of the robot uprising, the Sentinels’ rebellion is founded in the fact that their superior robotic intelligence makes them more suited to be the master than the slave; at the same time, in deference to their programming, the Sentinels justify their future overlordship over humanity by arguing that in order to protect humanity they must rule humanity. And in one last nod to the original, Trask remains useful to his creations only because they need his mastery of reproduction to propagate their species.

What elevates the Sentinels beyond mere sci-fi pastiche, however, is their visual aesthetic. Without a doubt the most recognizably Kirbyesque element of the X-Men Universe, there is something about the design that makes it instantly iconic in a genre not lacking for giant robots. The red-and-purple (later changed to pink-and-purple) onesie and boots and gloves aren’t particularly memorable on their own – the secret is in the stocky, short-limbed proportions that make them look like action figures come to (malevolent) life, their increasing scale (first generation Sentinels stand at 10 feet tall, making humans seem like children; later generations will start at 20 feet tall and only get bigger from there) and of course Kirby’s enduring obsession with the Olmec head that arguably reached its peak with Master Mold:

There is something genuinely uncanny about the frozen, disapproving visage of Master Mold, which towers above the Mark I Sentinels even as they tower above Bolivar Trask, assuming both the pose and position of some dark Olympian god, even as it demands the secrets of life while threatening death.

Another unusual element of the Sentinels is that they are a threat the X-Men themselves could not directly defeat – while the X-Men successfully penetrate the secret base of the Sentinels and manage to escape once captured, they never manage to come to blows with the Master Mold himself. And part of the reason why is that, following the conventions of science-fiction, Trask has to sacrifice himself to destroy Master Mold and prevent the Sentinels from propagating.

However, the Sentinels can never be destroyed forever – sooner or later, they will return to threaten mutantkind. In issue #57, less than 10 issues away from the series’ decline into reprints, the Sentinels return, and so do the themes and allusions of the original:

Here, the parallels to McCarthyism which had previously been more of a matter of tone than content all of the sudden become text, with Judge Chalmers’ Federal Council on Mutant Activities being an obvious play on the House Committee on Un-American Activities. Which I suppose makes Larry Trask, the younger, flashier, and more emotional assistant to Judge Chalmers, the Roy Cohn stand-in. The manila folders of evidence that Trask slams down on the table similarly resemble the leaked FBI reports that were key to the careers of both Senator McCarthy and HUAC.

On the other hand, Trask brings a starkly personal edge to his political argument that doesn’t particularly fit the metaphor – rather the allusion is more to the feud and the vendetta and their eternal cycles of retribution. Similarly, Larry Trask’s description of the mutant threat bears little resemblance to the idea of the mutant as the unknown Other – the mutant threat he sees is out in the open and more active than hypothethical, and so he gives it a new term:

The term “mutant war,” reminiscent of predictions of “race war” in the racist paranoid imagination, suggests a very different direction for the mutant metaphor, one that will be built on later to imagine mutant future dystopias that will almost always revolve around the presence of the Sentinels – more on this in a future People’s History of the Marvel Universe issue where I’ll discuss “Days of Future Past” and how Chris Claremont invented the Terminator franchise.

Also in this second outing, we see a renewed focus on the way that media shapes political debate – or if I’m being cynical, the way that the media allows comic books to present politics through a simplified image rather than trying to depict the complicated process of political organization. Hence the use of talking heads:

For those of you born after 1970 (which includes me), these two individuals are Chett Huntley and David Brinkley, who chaired the Huntley-Brinkley Report as NBC’s answer to Walter Cronkite between 1956 and 1970. This rare example of real-life figures making an appearance in X-Men comics is intended to give verisimilitude to the political news, which shows the meaning of the Sentinels shifting.

As already suggested by the Federal part of Chalmers’ Council on Mutant Activities, where the Mark I Sentinels were the rogue creations of an individual mad scientist, the Mark II Sentinels are hunting down mutants on behalf of the U.S government. This represents an entirely new paradigm for the X-universe, and foreshadows the X-Men’s outlaw status in Claremont’s run. Whereas in 1963 Professor Xavier could work comfortably with the FBI (more on this in a future issue), by 1969 the reading public was perhaps more willing to consider that the government might employ genocidal robots to hunt down American citizens for “the indescribable sin of being…a mutant,” in what Huntley and Brinkley describe as a “familiar” reaction to the “mutant problem.” Given the more overt comparison to the Holocaust, I’m not surprised to learn that then-Marvel-intern Chris Claremont offered story advice on these issues.

At the same time, we also see a rare departure for the X-Comics when Huntley and Brinkley explain that “Americans begin to question the wisdom – even the constitutionality – of this modern witch hunt.” We’ve seen anti-mutant prejudice described before, but we haven’t yet seen it be described as an explicitly political controversy, with the issue being raised of whether the U.S Constitution (presumably the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection and due process) protects mutant citizens against the state. Given that we almost never see mutants being discussed in political terms in the Lee/Kirby era, let alone in such similar terms to the Civil Rights Movement, this feels much more like the Claremont era’s discussion of the Mutant Registration Act (another topic for a future issue) than anything else from the original run.

Unfortunately for my purposes, as soon as we get this soupçon of politics, the whole thing veers back into sci-fi, albeit more reminiscent of high-concept shows like the Twilight Zone or Roddenberry’s Star Trek. Once again, the moment that the Sentinels are used, they rebel against their masters. It really makes you wonder why people keep building them. (Incidentally, this is one aspect of these characters that I wish had been used more in later years, especially in Morrison’s run, the aftermath of M-Day, and so forth). Here, the ironic twist is that mutant-hating Larry Trask is himself a mutant:

As morals go, it’s a bit on the nose – a little bit closer to The Scary Door than Twilight Zone. On the other hand, it’s not like the idea that a rabid ideologue secretly is what they most despise, their passion reflecting both intense denial and projection, is at odds with realism.

And it has one other advantage – with Larry Trask sidelined, there’s no Trask available to sacrifice their life to stop the Sentinels, which means we get the best moment in the whole of the original X-Men run, where Scott Summers executes a perfect Logic Bomb that convinces the Sentinels to make war on “the very heart of the raging sun itself!”

Conclusion:

As blunt as a metaphor for weighty themes like genocide, bigotry, and oppression they might be, the Sentinels were pretty much all the original X-Men had in the way of anti-mutant antagonists. And if you’re going to be fiddling with “mutant metaphors,” you’re going to need them around, otherwise people might start to ask uncomfortable questions about why the X-Men spend all of their time hunting down “evil mutants” on behalf of J. Edgar Hoover, rather than fighting their own oppression.

But that’s a topic for…next issue of A People’s History of the Marvel Universe!

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