Tag Archives: sombra

Review: Sombra #4

sombra_004_spanish_press_a_mainThe cover for Sombra #4 by artist Jilipollo (Javier Medellin) sets the tone for this final chapter. A group of kids wearing bulletproof vests, each one brandishing a handgun or machine gun, appear in mid stride amidst a field of flowers and flying butterflies. The rectangular rays of a muted white and green alternate above them, as if the distant, non-visible setting sun represents the innocence of these children being lost to time. It’s a great set up for the pages inside.

Writer Justin Jordan finishes Sombra with somber and effective words, interlaced with a slew of brutally violent images that are brought to life by Raul Trevino, making sure to focus on the harsh reality of this world without looking away. Trevino confronts the reader with images that must be seen, to witness the truth. As the reporter Esteban says as he records the battle between Rojas’s cartels and Conrad’s army of child soldiers: “They need to see, everyone must see.” Danielle bears witness to it all as well, unsure of her own actions at first but quickly realizes that she – and her being a representative of America – is in the wrong; this is not her nor her country’s fight.

sombra_004_english_press7Juan Useche focuses on the colours that stand out during this hectic, brutal scene with the squirts of red from connecting bullets and knife attacks and from the faces of the various children whom wear the colour as a painted skull. The children first emerge from the shadows as black shapes, their white skulls the only parts of them visible, heightening their tragic existences and how their own selves have been stripped through a continuing use of lack of colour, especially during a few of their own deaths. Jim Campbell effectively balances his lettering by placing balloons away from certain actions, allowing for the weight to lie heavier on the visuals instead of what is being said. Campbell also spreads out Jordan’s script to slow down at the right moments, intermittent of a flood of fast-paced actions.

Sombra overall does an effective job at showing the reality being faced by those experiencing the cartels first-hand and to show those, like Danielle, certain situations are best left to be figured out, to be solved, repaired, as Esteban says in his recorded video, by the people of Mexico. In turn, the attempted involvements made by outsiders like the U.S. in witnessing this distressing scenario can make for an inwardly attempt at reform. As Rojas enters the town lead by Conrad, before the bullets fly and knives are thrust, he stops in front of a display of pure depravity: skulls, body parts, smiles smeared with blood and candles are spread out, like a reverse shrine meant to divert the visitor instead of inviting for a moment of reflection. All Rojas can say is, “This is theatre.”

Story: Justin Jordan Art: Raul Trevino Color: Juan Useche Letters: Jim Campbell
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Boom! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Sombra #4 (of 4)

Sombra #4 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Justin Jordan
Artist: Raúl Treviño
Cover Artist: Jilipollo
Price: $3.99

Final issue! The battle between Rojas’s cartel and Conrad’s horrifying army ensues, with Danielle and Tolva stuck in the middle.

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Sombra #3 Reveals Its Heart of Darkness

sombra_003_english_press-3Sombra, from the very beginning, has been a tale of good and evil, light and dark, and those that believe what they are doing has a justifiable purpose in it, even if from the other side, the morals around what is being justified are highly questioned. Justin Jordan’s scripts have been doing a great job at this push and pull between right and wrong.

For instance, Danielle, the determined DEA agent, is sent on a mission she almost knows pits her as the bait. Danielle recognizes what is a justifiable right through her American upbringing and an upholder of the law. She is now face to face with her mission: Conrad Marlowe. Conrad is not only a defected DEA agent whom made it his own modus operandi to take down the cartels through very violent tactics; he is also Danielle’s father. Can Danielle overcome this familial fact in order to right a wrong she believes is ultimately doing more harm than it’s supposedly worth?

Raul Trevino’s illustrations are at their best so far in the series with this issue. The choices in panel movements are smart, placing the eye lines at the right spots to accelerate the tension during the last sequence (there is an especially haunting frame that is like a warped version of a Norman Rockwell painting), put an emphasized focus on the faces of Danielle and Conrad as he shows her around the ‘utopian’ place him and his people call home and draw attention to the innocent faces of the various children. Conrad is drawn very square, imposing and firm; one look at his full profile in a well-placed long frame, with his black shirt, green pants and military style boots acknowledges his importance and status. This very frame is unsettling due to not only Conrad’s presence but also of tiny miniature, perhaps carved, people hanging from a wrapping of green ivy, covered in bright pink flowers and next to his boots, the children that run freely, happily around, appear even smaller. Jim Campbell’s word balloon, with Jordan’s simple but effective line of “You think I’m a monster,” is the cherry on the top of this moment. Juan Useche’s colouring of the bright pink and blue sky in the background additionally act as a great, almost ironic parallel to the reality represented through Conrad’s stance.

sombra_003_english_press-6Speaking of Useche, his colouring is easily the standout attribute to this issue. The bright colours of the children’s clothing, the buildings, the spray-painted happy faces, and the open blue sky all connect with Conrad’s speech to Danielle of the new purpose he is trying to build for the people here. The brightness of the scene and use of a more vibrant colour scheme all act as masks to the supposed purity of a utopian world. Some places are utopian on the surface, only to truly survive through dystopian means (just read 1984 or Brave New World). Danielle just won’t buy any of what Conrad is trying to sell her, even after Conrad shows a warmer side to him as helps up a young girl who trips and falls. The whole sequence plays out like a PSA for some random cult. The back and forth between Conrad and Danielle ends with a great transition, just after Danielle says, “I’ve seen enough.” The brightness of day cuts to the next frame of Danielle sitting alone at night within an enclosed jail cell; the thick, black darkness tells no lies, only truths. In the world of Sombra, lies hide in the wide-open sprawl of the day, while at the night, the harsh but true reality comes to life.

Conrad’s mission, without getting too deep into spoiling the story, is contradictory. But, there is a point being made in what Jordan scripts through him. The speech Conrad makes about identifying as a monster reflects back to all Americans, as he says. The privileged and justifiable means to the laws America imposes on places like Mexico only make things worse and end up rewarding the “evil men.” Conrad believes what he has done and aims to do is justifiable, as a defected American. There is yet another parallel to what can be drawn out here through the character of Kurtz in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now. Whether this is intentional or not, it is interesting to note of the connections that can be drawn out here. Sombra #3 lashes out its political tongue, focusing on some relevant back and forth topics that should cause a conversation on what exactly does it mean to be in the right, committing to a so-called moral decision that has a justifiable backing to it, especially when an outsider imposes on a world they believe can be solved through questionable means.

Story: Justin Jordan Art: Raul Trevino Colours: Juan Useche Letters: Jim Campbell
Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Sombra #3 (of 4)

Sombra #3 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Justin Jordan
Artist: Raúl Treviño
Cover Artist: Jilipollo
Price: $3.99

Danielle finally comes face to face with her father Conrad Marlowe, and must confront her own sanity with the world he has built to fight the cartels.

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Sombra #2 Maintains Its Grim Tone With Some Personal Questions

Sombra_002_English_PRESS-5Sombra’s first issue ended with DEA agent Danielle Marlowe and local Mexico City journalist Esteban Tolva trapped under the floorboards of a church while a group of cartel members entered. Led by a man named Rojas, the cartel group knows that the two are in there and promise to lead Esteban to Danielle’s father, the former DEA agent Conrad Marlowe, whom has declared a violent war against the cartel. Trying to figure out an escape plan, Danielle and Esteban sit amongst an uncomfortable purple, blue haze of Juan Useche’s colours, starkly contrasted to the bright yellow, orange from above. Once the bullets start flying, the yellow, orange glow from above mixes with a slight tinge of pink as light streams downwards; its almost as if no matter where you are, an invading force is trying to find a way to mark its territory. This is a comic, like the colours used in this sequence, about parallels and contrasting beliefs.

This duality continues to muddle amongst the conversations Justin Jordan scripts. Assumptions can never be made in a place in which one can never really know what is exactly going on and who has control over the situation. Danielle questions the motives of a group of farmers that help her and Esteban escape, her doubt and untrustworthiness spill out, as her words don’t hold back her assumptive feelings. These farmers once had a stable farm, from the sounds of it, until the cartel, through false promises, took their claim of the land, as they have done with countless villages, and ended with their livelihood in ashes, thanks to the involvement of the DEA. Trust appears very hard to find when the supposed help being offered turns to potential turmoil, no matter who takes control of the land.

Sombra_002_English_PRESS-7Raul Trevino really shows the cartel as the all-encompassing evil, barely being able to see any texture to their faces with how much shadows are drawn overtop. It is as if he doesn’t want you to see any humanity behind their eyes. Before the grotesque moments at the village they are travelling to, a quieter moment captures one of the strongest moments of this series so far. During this travelling sequence, Trevino’s visuals speak further volumes on the words being spoken. Danielle questions the motives of Eduardo, one of the farmers, and why he is helping to protect someone whom works for an organization he doesn’t necessarily trust. But, Eduardo says he has responsibilities. It then cuts to close up frames of the three individual farmers in the truck, as Esteban tells of a story he did on their village. The frame underneath the smaller panels is a wider perspective of the road ahead of them, the trees and sky sharing the space. The land belongs to people like Eduardo and the other villagers Carlos and Arturo. They are constantly used and abused by the passing powers of the cartel. Jim Campbell places the word balloons slightly in front of their vehicle, guiding them and the story towards an unknown fate.

The creative team of Sombra has crafted an issue that improves on the introductory issue. The stakes still feel high and tense, especially with yet another cliffhanger ending, as Jordan likes to do (while he sits and laughs maniacally until the next issue drops, one would imagine). It’s great to see a title that uses the medium to ask relevant questions while maintaining its visual storytelling ability. There is one other scene worth mentioning further that contains some rather poignant words for the violent, irrational happenings around the world. As the group makes their way to a local village, a bloody display of mutilated corpses greets them. Esteban says to Danielle that this can be difficult to see for the first time. Danielle responds by saying, “This should be difficult to see every time.” Esteban says, “I wish that were so. But you can grow accustomed to anything, given time.” One can’t help but wonder whether these words are unfortunately true.

Story: Justin Jordan Art: Raul Trevino Colour: by Juan Useche
Lettering: Jim Campbell Cover: Jilipollo
Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

GENZERO_001_COVER-A_MOONEYWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: Faith #2 (Valiant) – I really can’t say enough about how much I’m enjoying this series. If you’re not reading it you’re missing out on one of the best comics from any publisher being released right now. Faith is a series that’s fun, that has a more positive outlook on things and takes some very light jabs at industry tropes. And it’s visually stunning.

Action Comics #962 (DC Comics) – It’s not often that I read a comic where Superman feels like he’s actually in a fight for his life, so watching the Man Of Steel in a rematch against Doomsday has been incredibly fun – even if the chances of him losing are nil.

Blue Beetle Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – I recently dug out the pre-New 52 run featuring Jaime Reyes, and wondered why I never read the series through the New 52 iteration. With how easy many of the Rebirth comics have been for new readers, I’m looking forward to this.

Generation Zero #1 (Valiant) – A new series from Valiant? Don’t mind if I do.

Northguard #1 (Chapterhouse Comics) – An incredibly underrated publisher, Chapterhouse have some fantastic series on the racks, one of which, Captain Canuck is a genuine pleasure to read. I’m excited for this spin off series that I know very little about (which is deliberate on my part), because based on Chapterhouse’s track record, this promises to be a blast.

 

Anthony

Top Pick: Pretty Deadly TP Vol. 2 (Image Comics) – The first volume of Pretty Deadly was a dark, poetic, bloody journey that featured one of the best creative teams in comics…period. The second arc here is collected for those that missed out on the single issues (or just loved it so much that the trade is worthy of purchasing) and features more striking images from Emma Rios and Jordie Bellaire’s colours with a hypnotic script by Kelly Sue DeConnick that will put you in the good kind of trance that makes Pretty Deadly a difficult title to put down.

Island #10 (Image Comics) – Anthologies tend to be hit and miss but not Island. Emma Rios and Brandon Graham have opened the creative floodgates by curating a slew of material from both artists more well known and those perhaps yet to be discovered by a wider audience. It’s also refreshing in that each and every issue of Island defines variety in covering a wide array of genres and material.

Faith #2 (Valiant) – It’s a very warming feeling to remember that Faith has her own ongoing series. Jody Houser provides such a great voice for Faith, blending her pop culture quips with dramatic moments. Maintaing the back and forth art style of Pere Perez during the present time and Marguerite Sauvage doing Faith’s fantasies from the mini series is an extra nice touch and has been played with wonderfully so far.

Generation Zero #1 (Valiant) – Straight from the pages of Harbinger comes a new team of super powered teens. Minus the Imperium title, there hasn’t been much explored in the Harbinger side of the Valiant universe recently besides a few appearances here and there in other titles so it will be very interesting to see what Fred Van Lente and Francis Portela have prepared. This has a very New Mutants type appearance featuring a younger group of misfits so the parallels between characters will be very intriguing to see in how it will be presented.

Sombra #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue of Sombra was a fairly solid introduction to this story of a DEA agent about to throw herself into the middle of a tense situation with the Mexican Cartel. With the introductory exposition out of the way, hopefully being thrown further into the fire is something on Justin Jordan’s mind. Raul Trevino’s photo realistic backgrounds with the shadowy but bright colours of Juan Useche really paint an uncomfortable tone, especially with how the violence felt so sudden in the first issue.

 

Shay

Top Pick: Alena (Dark Horse) – This is a great time to get on board with this horror comic treasure. This TP gives you the whole story so that you’e all caught up before it becomes a live action Swedish horror film. There’s mean girls, a best friend who had been dead for a year and lots of murder an blood.

Batgirl #2 (DC Comics) – This issue should be packed with enough kick ass girl power to wipe the taste of the Killing Joke out of your mouth and combined with last weeks Birds of Prey get you back on team Babs.

Buffy The Vampire Slayer , Season 10, #30 (Dark Horse) – All good things must come to an end and Season 10 off BTVS is no exception. Issue #330 ends this killer story arc and will remind us all why we keep reading and still enjoy watching the reruns.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Generation Zero #1 (Valiant) – I’ve been waiting for this series since it was announced and wondering when we’d next see Generation Zero since last we saw them (during Harbinger Wars?). I’m hoping for a new take on the New Mutants formula, and honestly that’s what I expect. It’s also an area Marvel has dropped the ball on, so glad to see Valiant picking it up and running with it.

Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od #1 (IDW Publishing) – It’s new Atomic Robo, really nuff said when it comes to why you should be checking this series out. I’ve yet to be disappointed by any volume of the series released. It’s always packed with action and humor, and constantly entertains.

The Hellblazer #1 (DC Comics) – I’m intrigued as to what version of John Constantine we’ll be getting. The Rebirth issue gave me some hope, but the real test is with this first issue.

Northguard #1 (Chapterhouse Comics) – Putting out fun, positive, superhero comics with lots of action and humor. I can’t wait to check out this new series which we got a tease of in their Summer Special.

The Revisionist #3 (Aftershock Comics) – Time traveling fun action. It’s entertainment for a genre that lends itself to all sorts of madness and interesting twists.

 

Preview: Sombra #2 (of 4)

Sombra #2 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Justin Jordan
Artist: Raúl Treviño
Cover Artist: Jilipollo
Price: $3.99

Danielle is well outside of the law now as she and Tolvo head to where Conrad is believed to be.

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Preview: Sombra #1 (of 4)

Sombra #1 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Justin Jordan
Artist: Raúl Treviño
Cover Artists:
Main: Jilipollo
FOC Variant: Chris Brunner
Spanish Edition: Raúl Treviño
Price: $3.99

Justin Jordan (John Flood, Spread) tackles a provocative topic—the violent drug cartels of Mexico—partnering with artist Raúl Treviño, who lives in Mexico and is drawing on his first-hand experiences to inform the story.

A DEA agent who disappeared in Mexico years ago has resurfaced and is now out-brutalizing some of the cartels he was sent to investigate. His daughter has been tasked with stopping him…by any means necessary.

Perfect for fans of Scalped, the novels Heart of Darkness andSavages, or the film Apocalypse Now.
Also available in a Spanish-language edition.

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Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

FAITH_ONGOING_001_COVER-A_WADAWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: Faith #1 (Valiant) – You’re going to hear a lot about this series in the coming weeks and months, and after the critically and commercially successful miniseries from the same creative team earlier in the year, the buzz will be massive. Whether the first issue will live up to expectations is tough to say; not because the comic will be sub-par, but because the hype will be massive. I’m rooting for you, Faith.

A&A: The Adventures Of Archer And Armstrong #5 (Valiant Entertainment)  – An underappreciated gem, this series is one of the most effortlessly entertaining comics on the racks today.Batman #3 (DC Comics) – I’m perhaps more cautious about this than I should be; the first two issues have been good, but there was a couple

Batman #3 (DC Comics) – I’m perhaps more cautious about this than I should be; the first two issues have been good, but there was a couple things in the second issue that turned me off a little bit. Although with only two issues down, there’s still a ton of potential here, so I’m not willing to give up on the series yet.Rai #15 (Valiant) – Another tie-in comic to what is, frankly, the best summer event this year: 4001 A.D., makes this a

Rai #15 (Valiant) – Another tie-in comic to what is, frankly, the best summer event this year: 4001 A.D., makes this a must-read for me.

Superman #3 (DC Comics) – I was never the biggest fan of Superman, but after having read the past two issues, I may be converted.

 

Anthony

Top Pick: Island #9 (Image Comics)Island has consistently been a treat from Image that boasts a very impressive line of creators. Anthologies like this are always great at featuring a wide array of individuals that are potentially fairly unheard of and open the floodgates of material that these eclectic creators have done or are in the midst of doing.

Black Hammer #1 (Dark Horse) – Jeff Lemire, Dean Ormston and Dave Stewart are looking to dive into the superhero genre but with a focus on a group of individuals trying to live an ordinary life. Jeff Lemire has continued to spark a lively, poetic script, no matter the genre he works in, so it is always interesting to see what he has up his sleeve. Visually, this series will be in good hands with the imaginative art of Dean Ormston and the always impressive colouring of Dave Stewart.

The Cloud (OGN) (Archaia/BOOM! Studios) – This looks like a very imaginative and beautifully illustrated release by Archaia. Featuring the graphic novel debut of writer K.I. Zachopoulos and illustrator Vincenzo Balzano, The Cloud has a very Neverending Story sort of vibe with quite the striking visuals.

Faith #1 (Valiant) – Faith is back with her own ongoing series! Having just recently written the mini-series of Faith and the excellent one shot of Shadowman for the 4001 event, Jody Houser looks to continue her winning streak for Valiant. Also having the one-two punch of Pere Perez and Marguerite Sauvage provide the reality and fantasies of Faith respectively on art is a wonderful thing.

Sombra #1 (BOOM! Studios)Sombra sounds like a very intriguing tale on the mysterious and terrifying reality of the Mexican cartel. What elevates this series is the fact that the story is being drawn from the actual experiences of the artist for the series, Raul Trevino. Writer Justin Jordan looks to continue his winning streak with BOOM! Studios after the excellent mini-series John Flood and will also feature, alongside Trevino’s art, the expressive colouring of Juan Useche and letterer Jim Campbell to round out the team.

 

Jason

She Wolf #2 (Image Comics) – Last month Rich Tommaso’s gorgeously illustrated and written take on the horror genre, She Wolf introduced us to gabby (her of the title) as her life was thrown into turmoil and intrigue when she is involved with the death of her boyfriend on the schools grounds. Reluctantly returning to classes under the cloud of the entire schools suspicion and fear she tries to hide a bigger problem and the truth behind that night, her lycanthropy.
That is if we believe the newly turned teenage shape shifter as issue one delivered a story that blurs the diction between waking and dreaming, truth and lies. Tommaso’s She Wolf has a completely compelling narrative and structure as he begins to tell Gabby’s story through a dreamlike feverish flow of flashbacks and horrifying imagery as soon neither reader nor Gabby can tell between the two. Demonstrated by the beautifully drawn chase scene that incorporates this slip between states effortlessly. Hopefully issue two will build upon the first foundations as we begin to peel away the layers and discover the truth at the heart of the She Wolf‘s Tale.

Rumble #12 (Image Comics) – Arcudia, Harren and Stewarts frenzied tale of the undead barbarian Rathraq rolls on into its third arc with its trademark nonstop action and it’s onslaught of punches both physical and emotional. Rumble is the sleeper hit of the year for sure with its frentic fight scenes and deep mythology, with Rathraq finding the modern world filled with shadows and grey moral areas as he fights on for his body and soul.

 

Mr. H

Batman #3 (DC Comics) – Batman teaming up with the heroes in training is something I’ve enjoyed thus far because we are getting a much softer Bruce here. He’s not putting them through the ringer like most his sidekicks. I have been enjoying the little moments that Tom King has been providing us here and David Finch is doing some of his best work on the art. I want to get a little more backstory on Gotham and Girl though. Plus the specter of Hugo Strange is looming in the background. Bad time to be Batman, good time to be a Batman fan!

Green Lanterns # 3 (DC Comics) – I am really digging the dysfunctional duo of Jessica Cruz and Simon Baz so far. Added in the fact that one of my favorite Lantern villains Attrocitus (who just looks damn cool) is bringing in an interesting story line here, I am stoked. This is certainly a very accessible title and I suggest people hop on and tighten their rings. Beware the RAGE!

Justice League #1 (DC Comics) – After the disappointment that was Justice League Rebirth #1 I wasn’t even sure this would make my cut. I am however willing to give it a shot. Tony Daniel on art (not writing thank God) and Hitch on writing could make this a must see. However, Johns and Co. left huge shoes to fill. I’m looking for something new here and by Rao, I hope we get it.

Darth Vader # 23 (Marvel) – This series is everything a Sith Lord should be. I have been catching up and rifling through back issues. The creative team here has truly found Vader’s voice. For a series that I thought should only be a mini-series, it sure proved me wrong.

 

Paul

Top Pick: A-Force #7 (Marvel) – This is one of my favorite team line-ups in the books I’m reading, and this title never disappoints. I love the writing, with the quips and sarcasm between the ladies, but also seeing them bonding so quickly as a team. Plus anything with Dazzler in it will automatically be a winner with me. Lots of fun and action; I think you should be reading this.

All-New Inhumans #9 (Marvel) – This has been an interesting book, with some highs and lows, but this latest story arc has been good. Flint’s search for his mother has brought us to a new tribe of Inhumans living in secret.  It’s interesting to see the different factions of Inhumans, from Lash’s Tribe, to Medusa and her kingdom in Attilan and now this new group; all Inhuman but living very different lives. Anyway, Flint has found his mother, but Gorgon is in some trouble…and Ana Kravenoff is aboard to cause some mayhem. As I said, a pretty good arc so far.

Batgirl and The Birds of Prey Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – A lot of DC titles popping up in my picks lately, but this one I am excited about.  I didn’t really follow the Birds of Prey pre-52, but I did know about them and the characters. I did start reading it when the 52 launched, with Black Canary and Starling forming the team, but something just didn’t really click with me on that book. Now we have the original trio back; Batgirl (once Oracle), Black Canary and Huntress.  Don’t know what to expect with this new Rebirth, but I’m sure there will be a lot of ass kicking.  Looking forward to it.

Uncanny X-Men #10 (Marvel) – The “Apocalypse Wars” are coming to an end, and Genocide has unleashed a horde of archangels to see his plans come to light. Magneto and Psylocke are going to have to work overtime to stop this one. Nothing groundbreaking here; good action and I like seeing Magneto and Psylocke working together, but this Apocalypse War story arc has been just ho-hum for me.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Garth Ennis’ Red Team: Double Tap #1 ( Dynamite Entertainment) – If you didn’t read the first volume of Red Team you missed out on an awesome crooked cop crime drama. I’m a sucker for that type of story and the fact we’re getting a second volume has me super excited.

Betty & Veronica #1 (Archie Comics) – Archie has been on a roll with their reboot of their Archie comics and Betty and Veronica are now in the spotlight with their own series. What has me more excited? It’s Adam Hughes writing and doing art. This is one I’ve been looking forward to for quite some time.

Elasticator #5 (Scout Comics) – Not checking out this superhero series? You’re missing out. This is a series and a company that’s on too few radars. Go and check it out from the beginning because you’re in for a treat!

Snotgirl #1 (Image Comics) – Bryan Lee O’Malley is doing an ongoing series. That should be enough to get people to check it out. If you don’t know who that is, he’s behind Scott Pilgrim as well as Seconds. This is a must get and expect a sell-out.

Sombra #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Writer Justin Jordan tackles Mexican Cartels in this new series. BOOM! is also releasing a version in Spanish. This is one to keep your eye on as the combination of the subject and that translation move is very interesting.

BOOM! Studios to Publish Spanish-Language Version of Sombra

To reach a wider audience for its upcoming limited series Sombra, BOOM! Studios announced it will publish a Spanish-language version day and date alongside the English-language version.

In our latest Demo-Graphic report, Spanish speaking comic fans in the United States accounted for a little over 20%.

In addition, BOOM! has partnered with publisher Editorial Kamite to publish Spanish-language editions of the Sombra limited series in Mexico day and date.

In Sombra, writer Justin Jordan tackles a provocative topic—the violent drug cartels of Mexico—partnering with artist Raúl Treviño, who lives in Mexico and is drawing on his first-hand experiences to inform the story. A DEA agent who disappeared in Mexico years ago and presumed dead has resurfaced and is now out-brutalizing some of the cartels he was sent to investigate. His daughter—also a DEA agent—has been tasked with stopping him…by any means necessary. Sombra is perfect for fans of Scalped, the novels Heart of Darkness and Savages, or the film Apocalypse Now.

Sombra #1 (of 4) arrives in comic shops on July 20th with a main cover by internationally renowned illustrator Jilipollo for the price of $3.99 under Diamond order code MAY161222. The Spanish-language version features a cover illustrated by series artist Raúl Treviño and bears Diamond code MAY168415. Also available is an Final Order Cutoff (FOC) incentive cover by Chris Brunner (Diamond code MAY168414) that can be ordered in any quantity.