Tag Archives: sean phillips

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ComiXology Features 11 New Releases from Marvel, Harlequin, AAM-MArkosia, Titan Comics, and Yen Press

There are 11 new digital comics available right now on comiXology. You can choose new digital comics from Marvel, Harlequin, AAM-Markosia, Titan Comics, and Yen Press. Get shopping now or check out the individual issues below.

Black Butler #174

Written by Yana Toboso
Art by Yana Toboso
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Baldo gets to see the blood drawing process firsthand, but it all seems…surprisingly normal. Read the next chapter of Black Butler at the same time as Japan!

Black Butler #174

Captain America Vol. 2: Extremists

Written by John Ney Rieber
Art by Trevor Hairsine, Jae Lee
Cover by John Cassaday
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Collects Captain America (2002) #7-11.

Captain America clashes with Redpath, an adversary that shares Cap’s ideal of a powerful and unified America, but who lacks a moral compass. Redpath and his team of cronies, The Extremists, plan to cleanse America by force — and only Captain America can stop them.

Captain America Vol. 2: Extremists

In Name Only

Written by Diana Hamilton
Art by Elly Okuyama
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Javier, the head of a prestigious Spanish clan, appears in front of Cathy, who adopted her sister’s child as her own. He says that he’s come to take custody of his younger brother’s child, who is the heir to his family line. Mistaking her to be the mother of the child, he coerces her into coming along with him to Spain. Cathy decides to pretend to be her younger sister until she is approved for adoption, but as she spends time with Javier, she becomes more and more attracted to him. But does she know that he’s only getting close to her to get to the child?

In Name Only

Katana Vol. 2 #1: The Pirates of Moon Lake

Written by Miroslav Petrov
Art by Veseli Chakarov
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A little girl is sentenced to death but survives deep inside the Magic Wood of the Valokaan Empire. A name of a sword becomes her name – Katana. Raised by mystical creatures, she dives into the world of humankind and reveals what it takes to seek her origin.

Katana Vol. 2 #1: The Pirates of Moon Lake

La prisonnière du Comte Valieri

Written by Sara Craven
Art by Kazuko Fujita
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Maddie, voyageant en Italie pour faire une interview, fut accueillie par le dénommé comte Valieri. Il lui prépara une chambre dans un hôtel luxueux, et l’invita aussi à un célèbre opéra. Mais dans la voiture du comte, la fatigue l’assaillit. Sans le savoir, elle fut conduite par un beau jeune homme et fut allongé dans un lit autre que le sien ! Confuse, le bel inconnu lui avoua des choses inattendue : « Tu seras mon otage jusqu’à ce que les négociations avec ton beau-père soient terminées ». Oui, voici le manoir du comte. Et Maddie est sa prisonnière !

La prisonnière du Comte Valieri

Missing Persons #1

Written by Liam Johnson
Art by Bernardo Vieira
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In 1971, enigmatic con artist DB Cooper parachuted from a hijacked plane with $200,000 in ransom. He was never seen again. Did he get away or did he die? The truth is neither. He was ripped from time, brought to the future, and enlisted to commit the greatest bank robbery the world will ever know. This is his story.

Missing Persons #1

The Royal Tutor #101

Written by Higasa Akai
Art by Higasa Akai
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It’s almost time for the princes to take the stage for their big speeches, but when big brother Eins takes the wind out of their sails, they’re going to need a pep talk from their royal tutor! Read the next chapter of The Royal Tutor the same day as Japan!

The Royal Tutor #101

Sea of Thieves #1: Champion of Souls

Written by Jeremy Whitely
Art by Rhoald Marcellius
Colored by Sakti Yuowono
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Before the Blackwyche became a relic in Shipwreck Bay, it was home to one of the noble and legendary pirates the Sea of Thieves had ever known. Follow the rise and fall of Sir Arthur Pendragon as he forges his name as the Champion of Souls, striking fear into the bones of every skeleton who dares to roam the waves.

Sea of Thieves #1: Champion of Souls

Spider-Man’s Tangled Web Vol. 2

Written by Kaare Andrews, Darwyn Cooke, Bruce Jones
Art by Kaare Andrews, Darwyn Cooke, Lee Weeks
Cover by Kaare Andrews
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Collects Spider-Man’s Tangled Web (2001) #7-11.

This critically-acclaimed collection features the Bruce Jones and Lee Weeks’s “Gentlemen’s Agreement”, Kaare Andrews’s “Ray of Light”, and Darwyn Cooke’s “Open All Night”: three stories of ordinary people whose lives are forever changed by Spider-Man!

Spider-Man’s Tangled Web Vol. 2

Spider-Man’s Tangled Web Vol. 3

Written by Brian Azzarello, Paul Pope, Daniel Way, Zeb Wells, Ron Zimmerman
Art by Giuseppe Camuncoli, Duncan Fegredo, Leo Fernandez, Sean Phillips, Paul Pope
Cover by Jason Pearson
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Collects Spider-Man’s Tangled Web (2001) #13-17.

An impressive list of indie creators take hard looks at living in the not-so-friendly neighborhood of the world-famous web-slinger! This is the perfect book for those who never thought they’d ever read — and enjoy — a Spider-Man story!

Spider-Man’s Tangled Web Vol. 3

Spider-Man’s Tangled Web Vol. 4

Written by Darwyn Cooke, Ted McKeever, Robbie Morrison, Zeb Wells
Art by Darwyn Cooke, Dean Haspiel, Jim Mahfood, Ted McKeever
Cover by Frank Cho
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Collects Spider-Man’s Tangled Web (2001) #18-22, Peter Parker: Spider-Man #42-43.

What’s it like to live in a world where Spider-Man swings overhead? Find out as some of the comic book industry’s most unique creators explore various city-dwellers, both super-powered and not, whose lives are changed when the wall-crawler leaps into their lives.

Spider-Man’s Tangled Web Vol. 4

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Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2020

2020 definitely felt like a year where I embraced comics in all their different formats and genres from the convenient, satisfying graphic novella to the series of loosely connected and curated one shots and even the door stopper of an omnibus/hardcover or that charming webcomic that comes out one or twice a week on Instagram. This was partially due to the Covid-19 pandemic that shut down comics’ traditional direct market for a bit so I started reviewing webcomics, trade paperbacks, graphic novels and nonfiction even after this supply chain re-opened. I also co-hosted and edited two seasons of a podcast about indie comics where we basically read either a trade every week for discussion, and that definitely meant spending more time with that format. However, floppy fans should still be happy because I do have a traditional ongoing series on my list as well as some minis.

Without further ado, here are my favorite comics of 2020.

Marvels Snapshots: X-Men #1 – But Why Tho? A Geek Community

10. Marvels Snapshots (Marvel)

Curated by original Marvels writer Kurt Busiek and with cover art by original Marvels artist Alex Ross, Marvels Snapshots collects seven perspectives on on the “major” events of the Marvel Universe from the perspectives of ordinary people from The Golden Age of the 1940s to 2006’s Civil War. It’s cool to get a more character-driven and human POV on the ol’ corporate IP toy box from Alan Brennert and Jerry Ordway exploring Namor the Submariner’s PTSD to Evan Dorkin, Sarah Dyer, and Benjamin Dewey showing the real reason behind Johnny Storm’s airhead celebrity act. There’s also Mark Russell and Ramon Perez’s take on the classic Captain America “Madbomb” storyline, Barbara Kesel’s and Staz Johnson’s sweet, Bronze Age-era romance between two first responders as the Avengers battle a threat against the city, and Saladin Ahmed and Ryan Kelly add nuance to the superhuman Civil War by showing how the Registration Act affects a Cape-Killer agent as well as a young elemental protector of Toledo, Ohio, who just wants to help his community and do things like purify water. However, the main reason Marvels Snapshots made my “favorite” list was Jay Edidin and Tom Reilly‘s character-defining work showing the pre-X-Men life of Cyclops as he struggles with orphan life, is inspired by heroes like Reed Richards, and lays the groundwork for the strategist, leader, and even revolutionary that appears in later comics.

9. Fangs (Tapas)

Fangs is cartoonist Sarah Andersen’s entry into the Gothic romance genre and was a light, funny, and occasionally sexy series that got me through a difficult year. Simply put, it follows the relationship of a vampire named Elsie and a werewolf named Jimmy, both how they met and their life together. Andersen plays with vampire and werewolf fiction tropes and sets up humorous situations like a date night featuring a bloody rare steak and a glass of blood instead of wine, Jimmy having an unspoken animosity against mail carriers, and just generally working around things like lycanthropy every 28 days and an aversion to sunlight. As well as being hilarious and cute, Fangs shows Sarah Andersen leveling up as an artist as she works with deep blacks, different eye shapes and textures, and more detailed backgrounds to match the tone of her story while not skimping on the relatable content that made Sarah’s Scribbles an online phenomenon.

8. Heavy #1-3 (Vault)

I really got into Vault Comics this year. (I retroactively make These Savage Shores my favorite comic of 2019.) As far as prose, I mainly read SF, and Vault nicely fills that niche in the comics landscape and features talented, idiosyncratic creative teams. Heavy is no exception as Max Bemis, Eryk Donovan, and Cris Peter tell the story of Bill, who was gunned down by some mobsters, and now is separated from his wife in a place called “The Wait” where he has to set right enough multiversal wrongs via violence to be reunited with her in Heaven. This series is a glorious grab bag of hyperviolence, psychological examinations of toxic masculinity, and moral philosophy. Heavy also has a filthy and non-heteronormative sense of humor. Donovan and Peter bring a high level of chaotic energy to the book’s visuals and are game for both tenderhearted flashbacks as well as brawls with literal cum monsters. In addition to all this, Bemis and Donovan aren’t afraid to play with and deconstruct their series’ premise, which is what makes Heavy my ongoing monthly comic.

Amazon.com: Maids eBook: Skelly, Katie, Skelly, Katie: Kindle Store

7. Maids (Fantagraphics)

Writer/artist Katie Skelly puts her own spin on the true crime genre in Maids, a highly stylized account of Christine and Lea Papin murdering their employers in France during the 1930s. Skelly’s linework and eye popping colors expertly convey the trauma and isolation that the Papins go through as they are at the beck and call of the family they work almost 24/7. Flashbacks add depth and context to Christine and Lea’s characters and provide fuel to the fire of the class warfare that they end up engaging in. Skelly’s simple, yet iconic approach character design really allowed me to connect with the Papins and empathize with them during the build-up from a new job to murder and mayhem. Maids is truly a showcase for a gifted cartoonist and not just a summary of historical events.

6. Grind Like A Girl (Gumroad/Instagram)

In her webcomic Grind Like A Girl, cartoonist Veronica Casson tells the story of growing up trans in 1990s New Jersey. The memoir recently came to a beautiful conclusion with Casson showing her first forays into New York, meeting other trans women, and finding a sense of community with them that was almost the polar opposite of her experiences in high school. I’ve really enjoyed seeing the evolution of Veronica Casson’s art style during different periods of her life from an almost Peanuts vibe for her childhood to using more flowing lines, bright colors, and ambitious panel layouts as an older teen and finally an adult. She also does a good job using the Instagram platform to give readers a true “guided view” experience and point out certain details before putting it all together in a single page so one can appreciate the comic at both a macro/micro levels. All in all, Grind Like A Girl is a personal and stylish coming of age memoir from Veronica Casson, and I look forward to seeing more of her work.

5. Papaya Salad (Dark Horse)

Thai/Italian cartoonist Elisa Macellari tells an unconventional World War II story in Papaya Salad, a recently translated history comic about her great uncle Sompong, who just wanted to see the world. However, he ended up serving with the Thai diplomatic corps in Italy, Germany, and Austria during World War II. Macellari uses a recipe for her great uncle’s favorite dish, papaya salad, to structure the comic, and her work has a warm, dreamlike quality to go with the reality of the places that Sampong visits and works at. Also, it’s very refreshing to get a non-American or British perspective on this time in history as Sampong grapples with the shifting status of Thailand during the war as well as the racism of American soldiers, who celebrate the atomic bomb and lump him and his colleagues with the Japanese officers, and are not shown in a very positive light. However, deep down, Papaya Salad is a love story filled with small human moments that make life worth living, like appetizing meals, jokes during dark times, and faith in something beyond ourselves. It’s a real showcase of the comics medium’s ability to tell stories from a unique point of view.

4. Pulp (Image)

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (with colorist Jacob Phillips) are two creators whose work has graced my “favorite comics” list many times. And this time they really outdid themselves with the graphic novella Pulp about the final days of Max Winters, a gunslinger-turned-Western dime novelist. It’s a character study peppered with flashbacks as Phillips and Phillips use changes in body posture and color palette to show Max getting older while his passion for resisting those who would exploit others is still intact. Basically, he can shoot and rob fascists just like he shot and robbed cattle barons back in the day. Brubaker and Phillips understand that genre fiction doesn’t exist in a vacuum and is informed by the historical context around it, which is what makes Pulp such a compelling read. If you like your explorations of the banality of evil and creeping specter of fascism with heists, gun battles, and plenty of introspection, then this is the comic for you.

3. My Riot (Oni Press)

Music is my next favorite interest after comics so My Riot was an easy pick for my favorite comics list. The book is a coming of age story filtered through 1990s riot girl music from writer Rick Spears and artist Emmett Helen. It follows the life of Valerie, who goes from doing ballet and living a fairly conservative suburban life to being the frontwoman and songwriter for a cult riot girl band. Much of this transformation happens through Helen’s art and colors as his palette comes to life just as Valerie does when she successfully calls out some audience members/her boyfriend for being sexist and patronizing. The comic itself also takes on a much more DIY quality with its layouts and storytelling design as well as how the characters look and act. My Riot is about the power of music to find one’s identify and true self and build a community like The Proper Ladies do throughout the book. Valerie’s arc is definitely empowering and relatable for any queer kid, who was forced to conform to way of life and thinking that wasn’t their own.

2. Getting It Together #1-3 (Image)

I’ll let you in on a little secret: slice of life is my all-time favorite comic book genre. So, I was overjoyed when writers Sina Grace and Omar Spahi, artist Jenny D. Fine, and colorist Mx. Struble announced that they were doing a monthly slice of life comic about a brother, sister, and their best friend/ex-boyfriend (respectively) set in San Francisco that also touched on the gay and indie music scene. And Getting It Together definitely has lifted up to my pre-release hype as Grace and Spahi have fleshed out a complex web of relationships and drama with gorgeous and occasionally hilarious art by Fine and Struble. There are gay and bisexual characters all over the book with different personalities and approaches to life, dating, and relationships, which is refreshing too. Grace, Spahi, and Fine also take some time away from the drama to let us know about the ensemble cast’s passions and struggles like indie musician Lauren’s lifelong love for songwriting even if her band has a joke name (Nipslip), or her ex-boyfriend Sam’s issues with mental health. I would definitely love to spend more than four issues with these folks.

1. The Impending Blindness of Billie Scott (Avery Hill)

My favorite comic of 2020 was The Impending Blindness of Billie Scott , a debut graphic novel by cartoonist Zoe Thorogood. The premise of the comic is that Billie is an artist who is going blind in two weeks, and she must come up with some paintings for her debut gallery show during that time period. The Impending Blindness of Billie Scott boasts an adorably idiosyncratic cast of characters that Thorogood lovingly brings to life with warm visuals and naturalistic dialogue as Billie goes from making art alone in her room to making connections with the people around her, especially Rachel, a passionate folk punk musician. The book also acts as a powerful advocate for the inspirational quality of art and the act of creation. Zoe Thorogood even creates “art within the art” and concludes the story with the different portraits that Billie painted throughout her travels. The Impending Blindness of Billie Scott was the hopeful comic that I needed in a dark year and one I will cherish for quite some time as I ooh and aah over Thorogood’s skill with everything from drawing different hair styles to crafting horrific dream sequences featuring eyeballs.

Underrated: Incognito

Time got away from me this week, so we’re rerunning an older column from yesteryear.

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Incognito


My local comic shop recently got the hardcover edition of Incognito in, and it last all of ten minutes on the table where it was in line for pricing as I picked it up and read what amounted to half the first issue before scooping it up before it ever actually made it to the shelf.

Written by Ed Brubaker, with art by Sean Phillips and colours by Val Staples, the hardcover collects both Incognito and the sequel Incognito: Bad Influences within its 360-odd pages as well an essay, a series cover gallery and some interesting process pieces. If you’ve read any of Brubaker and Phillips other work together, such as Criminal, Fatale or Kill Or Be Killed, then you probably have an idea what you’re in for. If you don’t… well, let’s just say you’re in for a very compelling story that you’ll probably want to read multiple times.

If you want to read the series’ synopsis, it’s below. If you don’t… well, skip the next paragraph, I guess. Either way, you’ll find the core premise of the comic below.

What if you were an ex-super villain hiding out in Witness Protection… but all you could think about were the days when the rules didn’t apply to you? Could you be a humdrum office clerk after being the best at years of leaving destruction in your wake? And what if you couldn’t stand it? What would you do then? 

This story is steeped in the pulp fiction of the 30’s and 40’s, stories that undeniably inspired the superhero fiction of today. Brubaker takes those early influences and fills out a world that has descended from them; there’s a very clear path in Incognito back to characters like the Shadow and the Spider (or rather Brubaker’s version thereof), and it gives the reader the sense that we’re barely scratching the surface with the characters and history revealed through the course of the hardcover’s 360-odd pages.

I was immediately taken in by the story as we learned more about Zack Overkill and how he went from a heavy hitting super villain to a lowly file clerk barely noticed by his coworkers. We see flashes of his mandated psychiatric appointments, the oh-so-real struggles he’s facing in a life that he’s not accustomed too. If you remove the super powered aspect from the opening part of the story, you can see a man struggling with his mental health amidst an unfulfilling life of boredom and depression. Is it any wonder that he eventually turns to drugs in order to find an escape?

Zach Overkill is an oddly likable guy despite never hiding (at least from us) what kind of man he used to be; whether this story is about his trying to find redemption, or a larger tale about whether a leopard can truly change its spots is one of the best parts about this book. Brubaker asks you not whether you can change for the better after making a horrible series of life choices, but whether others can accept your change. Whether they truly believe it, or if once they’ve labelled you a villain then that’s how they will always see you.

I should have expected good stuff from this book, but I wasn’t quite prepared with just how good it would be.

In a story that can be so much to so many, we’re left asking ourselves who we really are; are you really the person you think you are, or are you just a product of what this world has made you?


Join us next week where there will doubtless be another movie, series, comic or comic related thing discussed that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Review: Reckless

A former Sixties radical, Ethan Reckless is a fixer, part detective, part wrecking ball. When a friend from his Weather Underground days returns, he’ll have to face his own past.

Reckless is the first in a new line of graphic novels from Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Jacob Phillips.

It’s a brand new take on the classic pulp style stories.

Story: Ed Brubaker
Art: Sean Phillips
Color: Jacob Phillips

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Reckless

Reckless

(W) Ed Brubaker (A) Jacob Phillips (A/CA) Sean Phillips
In Shops: Dec 16, 2020
SRP: $24.99

Sex, drugs, and murder in 1980s Los Angeles… And the best new twist on paperback pulp heroes since The Punisher or Jack Reacher.

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, the modern masters of crime noir, bring us the last thing anyone expected from them – a good guy. In a bold new series of original graphic novels, with three books releasing over the next year, each a full-length story that stands on its own.

Meet Ethan Reckless: Your trouble is his business, for the right price. But when a fugitive from his student radical days reaches out for help, Ethan must face the only thing he fears… his own past.

Look for book 2 in the Reckless series in April 2021!

Reckless

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ Pulp is the anti-Fascist Western We Need Right Now

“Shoot to win can feel so bittersweet. But you can take what you can get ’cause there ain’t no glory in the west.”

-from “No Glory in the West” by Orville Peck
PULP is the next OGN from Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips - The Beat

Thanks to their work on titles like Criminal, The Fade Out, Kill or Be Killed, and many others, writer Ed Brubaker and artist Sean Philips’ collaborations have been some of my favorite comics to seek out on the stands. And their new Image Comics graphic novella, Pulp, is no exception. Set in New York in 1939 with occasional flashbacks to the turn of the 20th century, Pulp chronicles the last days of Max Winters, an Old West gun fighter and outlaw turned writer of pulp Westerns for the fictional magazine Six Gun Western. Brubaker and Phillips with amazing spot reds from colorist Jacob Phillips blur fact and fiction and show and steadily build up that Winters’ character, the Red River Kid, is a barely fictionalized version of his younger self.

While Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips riff on crime fiction tropes in their usual manner and add a dollop of the “one last job” story, I would consider Pulp to be a straight Western even though it’s predominantly set in New York. This mostly comes from the way Max behaves, especially in crime settings. (Car chases are definitely more stressful than horse ones.) However, Brubaker and Phillips aren’t merely content to do their take on this classic American staple of the Western, but instead recontextualize the genre to be about resistance against those who would exploit others (Basically, class warfare.), especially Nazis and fascists.

Image from Pulp

They lay the breadcrumbs for this early on as Max stands up for a young Jewish man at the subway station even though it leads to him getting his ass kicked, having a heart attack, and being robbed of his entire freelance paycheck that he was squirreling away to buy a house in Queens for him and his partner, Rosa. This scene sets up Max as a champion of the marginalized as Phillips and Phillips’ visuals convey the righteous fury in his soul as he stands up for what’s right even if no one helps him out when he takes a beating. The fury extends to the salty frankness of his dialogue as he tells the young anti-Semite, stating “Everyone here’s had enough of your crap”. Max is like if Clint Eastwood in Unforgiven had a social conscience, and this informs all of his actions in the narrative, especially in the second half of the book when he decides to fall in with an old foe. And not just any old enemy: a Pinkerton.

Even though they had semi-heroic beginnings as bodyguards for President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War, Pinkertons become synonymous with strike-breaking and cloak and dagger operations to uphold the status quo. Historically, they tracked down the Jesse James Gang and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid so they’re a good fit for baddies in a Western and are still doing private security to this day as part of the firm, Securitas AB. So, basically, Brubaker and Phillips set up the former Pinkerton, Goldman, who catches Max trying to do a robbery in broad daylight as an untrustworthy fellow with a bit of a bitter edge. Sean Phillips never draws Max and Goldman as buddy buddy arranging them in opposition to each other with Goldman as a savvy operator and Max as a cowboy stuck in city alleys instead of the open plains of Wyoming or another Western state.

This visual depiction extends to Ed Brubaker’s plot as what Max thinks is just good old-fashioned stage coach robbery (But with Nazis instead of cattle barons.) turns into something a little more complex as Goldman wants to hit at the names and accounts of Nazis, not just their cash. Of course, Max thinks this is all nonsense, and his captions the 1939 Old West gun fighter version of ACAB. (“Why would I trust a Pinkerton?”) However, Brubaker and Phillips drop in Goldman’s backstory that he had a good job doing accounting work for Henry and was laid off because he was Jewish, which makes him more of a sympathetic figure, and also sets up Max’s final showdown where he takes guns a-blazing vengeance against the fascists and on behalf of his Jewish partner, who was wrongfully murdered, even though he (and we) know that this will end in his demise. But he has that house in Queens for Rosa so he has nothing left to lose.

Image from Pulp

For better or worse, Max’s actions in both the Western past and New York present of Pulp are consistent. He always fights on behalf of folks that are exploited by those who have the power in society whether that’s settlers and robber barons or Jewish people and Nazis. He even advocates for ownership of his character Red River Kid (Pretty much self-ownership.) and going in a new creative direction with the character instead of retreading the same plots, but as anyone who has read about the history of comics that’s a futile battle. There’s a real Martin Goodman/Stan Lee vibe from Max’s editor Mort and his nephew Sidney, who’s a fan of Max’s Westerns and will do his job for a much cheaper rate. These scenes and Max’s sense of justice lead to more anger and chest pains and is what leads to him to picking up gun again and becoming an outlaw.

Image from Pulp

In Pulp, Brubaker and Phillips create a strong through-line between the exploitation of capitalists and fascists whose actions are insulated by people “just following orders”. Max is very aware of the banality of evil, and that’s why his final showdown is at German Bund beer hall and not against a veiled stand-in for Adolf Hitler atop a zeppelin. He has put his affairs in order, has set up his partner Rosa for life, just wants to avenge the death of his unlikely friend, Goldman, and put some goddamn Nazis six feet under. Sean Phillips and Jacob Phillips up the intensity of the visuals in these final pages with plenty of guns, red, and abstraction while Ed Brubaker’s narration sums up what Max thinks of himself before his death, namely, “We weren’t heroes. We were killers.” Even though Max has good values, it was his quick trigger finger that kept him alive in the Old West, and it’s deteriorating heart that gets him in the end in a bar in New York surrounded by swastikas. But, at least, he went down shooting.

Pulp is a fantastic transposition of the Western to the big, modern city as Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips apply outlaw-turned-pulp-writer code of fighting for the downtrodden to championing Jewish people against fascism even before the United States declared war on Nazi Germany. Max’s actions and ideals strike a chord in 2020 where the President of the United States himself called Nazis and white supremacists “very fine people”, and they run rampant both in the street and online. With his vulnerability, tenacity, soft spot for Rosa, and heart for justice, Max Winters is definitely the character find of 2020, and Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Jacob Phillips do a wonderful job making a Western story both exciting and socially relevant.

Comics Deserve Better: Episode 3: Daytripper by Fábio Moon, Gabriel Bá, Dave Stewart, and Sean Konot

In this week’s Comic Deserve Better, Brian, Darci, and Logan discuss Fábio Moon, Gabriel Bá‘, and Dave Stewart‘s life and death masterpiece, Daytripper, and get emotional and occasionally personal while breaking down the craft of this great title. They also chat about a plethora of recent indie releases ranging from Singaporean newspaper comics about Covid-19 and self-published comics about going to movie theaters (Remember those!) to Vault ComicsFinger Guns, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips Pulp, and the manga, Yona of the Dawn. There’s something for everyone in this episode! (Episode art by Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá.)

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips Get Reckless in December

This December, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are getting Reckless, a new original graphic novel being published by Image Comics. The second volume in the series will be out April 2021 but each graphic novel is a standalone story.

Meet Ethan Reckless: Your trouble is his business, for a price.

A former student radical, with the scars to prove it, Ethan is one part repo man, one part private eye, and one part wrecking ball. But when a fugitive from his Weather Underground days reaches out for help, Ethan will have to face the only thing he really fears… his own past.

It’s sex, drugs, and murder in early ‘80s Los Angeles, as Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips launch their first graphic novel series with an electrifying new take on the paperback pulp hero.

Brubaker and Phillips plan on releasing three graphic novels in the first year with outlines for at least five more after.

Reckless

Enjoy Marvel Adventures with the Hulk, take a Deep Dive with Aquaman, and… brains… with Marvel Zombies: Dead Days in Today’s Digital Comics

ComiXology has new digital comics from DC Comics and Marvel in today’s new releases. There are comics for every age and you can see what you can get below.

Aquaman: Deep Dives #3

Written by Steve Orlando
Pencils Ken V Marion
Inks Sandu Florea
Colored by Andrew Dalhouse
Purchase

Aquaman and Tempest race to stop an enraged monster that has escaped its magical tomb under the city of New York.

Aquaman: Deep Dives #3

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 1: Misunderstood Monster

Written by Paul Benjamin
Art by David Nakayama
Cover by Carlo Pagulayan
Purchase

Collects Marvel Adventures Hulk #1-4.

The Green Goliath smashes his way into his own Marvel Adventures title! See how brilliant scientist Bruce Banner was cursed to transform into the rampaging Hulk! Learn why Banner’s girlfriend Betty Ross left him, why her father, General “Thunderbolt” Ross, hunts him and why Rick Jones blames himself for creating the monster. Most of all, thrill to the Hulk smashing everything in sight!

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 1: Misunderstood Monster

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 2: Defenders

Written by Paul Benjamin
Art by David Nakayama, Steve Scott
Cover by Juan Santacruz
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Collects Marvel Adventures Hulk #5-8.

The Green Goliath continues to smash his way through his own Marvel Adventures title! See how brilliant scientist Bruce Banner was cursed to transform into the rampaging Hulk! Dr. Strange, the Silver Surfer and Namor all arrive on the scene, concluding in an all-new Defenders team-up adventure! Most important, thrill to the Hulk smashing everything in sight!

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 2: Defenders

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 3: Strongest One There Is

Written by Paul Benjamin
Art by Steve Scott
Cover by David Nakayama
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Collects Marvel Adventures Hulk #9-12.

The Green Goliath smashes his way into his own Marvel Adventures title! Caught in the explosion of a gamma bomb, brilliant scientist Bruce Banner was transformed into a hulking beast! With no control over his transformations, Banner lives on the run, helping those less fortunate than he, hoping to one day find a cure to rid himself of the rampaging Hulk. Featuring Doc Samson, the Juggernaut and the Thing – and the Hulk smashing everything in sight!

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 3: Strongest One There Is

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 4: Tales To Astonish

Written by Peter David
Art by Juan Santacruz
Cover by Sean Murphy
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Collects Marvel Adventures Hulk #13-16.

The Green Goliath continues to smash his way through his own Marvel Adventures title! Caught in the explosion of a gamma bomb, brilliant scientist Bruce Banner was transformed into a hulking beast! With no control over his transformations, Banner lives on the run, helping those less fortunate than he, hoping to one day find a cure to rid himself of the rampaging Hulk. Featuring Psycho Man, the Leader, the Abomination and the Marvel Mummies — and the Hulk smashing everything in sight!

Marvel Adventures Hulk Vol. 4: Tales To Astonish

Marvel Zombies: Dead Days

Written by Reginald Hudlin, Robert Kirkman, Mark Millar
Art by Mitch Breitweiser, Greg Land, Sean Phillips, Francis Portela
Cover by Arthur Suydam
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Collects Marvel Zombies: Dead Days; Ultimate Fantastic Four #21-23, #30-32; And Black Panther (2005) #28-30.

At last – experience the birth of the Marvel Zombies as told by the creative team of the best-selling limited series, and then witness their rise as they attempt to slake their hunger across two universes! First, Robert Kirkman and Sean Phillips pull out all the stops as they reveal the secret story of the day the Marvel Heroes became brain-eating monsters! Next, follow the Marvel Zombies into the pages of Mark Millar and Greg Land’s ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR! Reed Richards has used his scientific genius to contact an Earth in a surprisingly familiar parallel dimension – and he’s ready to visit! But nothing could have prepared him for the world he’s about to enter! Finally, get out the hot sauce, True Believer – it’s slobberin’ time! In Reginald Hudlin and Francis Portela’s Black Panther, the mainstream Marvel Universe’s New Fantastic Four just made a wrong turn on the dimensional super highway – and they’ve landed in the middle of Zombie-verse! And if that weren’t bad enough, they’ve parked their butts on that universe’s Skrull Planet!

Marvel Zombies: Dead Days

Rocket To The Moon! #1

Written by Don Brown
Art by Don Brown
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On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong took “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” when the Apollo 11 landed on the moon. But it wasn’t just one man who got us to the moon. Rocket to the Moon! explores the people and technology that made the moon landing possible. Instead of examining one person’s life, it focuses on the moon landing itself, showing the events leading up to it and how it changed the world. The book takes readers through the history of rocket building: from ancient Chinese rockets, to “bombs bursting in air” during the War of 1812, to Russia’s Sputnik program, to the moon landing. Beautifully illustrated and well-researched, this book is the perfect resource for curious readers and tomorrow’s scientists. It includes a timeline of space travel, a bibliography, and an index.

Rocket to the Moon #1

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Jacob Phillips and Chris Condon Spill That Texas Blood in May

Critically acclaimed Criminal colorist and first time solo artist Jacob Phillips and writer Chris Condon break onto the scene with a brand-new ongoing series—That Texas Blood—launching from Image Comics this May.

Like Paris, Texas gut-punched by No Country for Old Men, this mature neo-Western crime series kicks off when the search for a casserole dish leads to a dark and tense confrontation on Sheriff Joe Bob Coates’ 70th birthday. 

Sheriff Joe Bob Coates has always lived in Fort Lehane. He’s always been in Ambrose County. It’s always been in his blood. It’s a Texas thing. But the crimes don’t stop. And they don’t get easier.

For some reason… they keep getting worse. And worse. And… Well. It’s Texas. And Joe Bob is tough. Maybe he’s tough enough to fight it. To last. It’s in his blood, after all. That Texas Blood.

That Texas Blood #1 Cover A by Jacob Phillips (Diamond Code MAR200029) and That Texas Blood #1 Cover B by Sean Phillips (Diamond Code MAR200030) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, May 27.

That Texas Blood #1
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