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Exclusive: Max Dunbar and Tom Neely Card Art from Chaotic Neutral Revealed

They said fantasy roleplaying games were dangerous and they were wrong. But now? Maybe they were right to be afraid! Writer Mark Sable and artist Chris Anderson have created a Kickstarter campaign for Chaotic Neutral, an all-new 48-page comic book first issue inspired by the old school fantasy roleplaying games that worried parents and teachers alike. Chaotic Neutral delivers magic, adventure, and storytelling—with an edge.

And Chaotic Neutral is more than just a comic:

  • Mark Sable has written an official Chaotic Neutral Adventure Module that you can play using most old school fantasy games.
  • Acclaimed comics creator Ryan Browne (God Hates Astronauts; Curse Words) has created an all-new, Chick Tracts-styled comic with a very specific message: comic books and RPGs will ruin your life.
  • Superstar artists Max Dunbar (Dungeons & Dragons), Jeremy Haun (Haunthology), Maan House (Godkillers), Jeff Johnson (Boondocks), Tom Neely (The Humans), Dan Panosian (Slots), Jim Rugg (Mtsryr: Octobriana 1976), Tim Seeley (Money Shot) and Kyle Strahm (Spread) have created Chaotic Neutral: Monster Trading Cards. This uncut trading card sheet will feature one side with art, while the other will contain stats for a campaign.

We have an exclusive look at Tom Neely and Max Dunbar’s Chaotic Neutral: Monster Trading Card art. Check out Neely’s Night-Mare and Dunbar’s Skeleton below!

The Kickstarter has crossed its goal and ends on October 28, 2021 at 11:59 EDT.

Preview: Quantum & Woody: Earth’s Last Choice

QUANTUM & WOODY: EARTH’S LAST CHOICE TPB

Written by CHRISTOPHER HASTINGS
Art by RYAN BROWNE
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale NOVEMBER 4th | 112 pages, full color | $14.99 US | T+ | ISBN: 978-1-68215-362-8

Supervillains and mad scientists are on the loose and only the world’s worst superhero duo can save us!

Eric and Woody Henderson have been a lot of things – fractious foster brothers, washed up failures, and, ever since the freak accident that gave them their powers, reluctant crimefighting partners. But now against all odds they’ll be Earth’s LAST hope of stopping a coalition of mad scientists from destroying the planet!

Superstar scribe Christopher Hastings (The Unbelievable Gwenpool) and astonishing artist Ryan Browne (Curse Words) team up for a side-splitting superhero adventure!

Collecting QUANTUM & WOODY (2020) #1–4.

QUANTUM & WOODY: EARTH'S LAST CHOICE TPB

Review: Quantum and Woody #4

QUANTUM & WOODY #4

Home Alone, the boys are left to defend their lair against would-be bandits! What is Woody’s dark secret? The truth is finally revealed in Quantum and Woody #4!

The finale to the four-part miniseries finds writer Christopher Hastings, artist Ryan Browne, and color artist Ruth Redmond coming together one more time (though hopefully not for the final time) for a comic I have waited nearly three months to read. Was it worth the wait? Was I able to just pick it up and enjoy it without refreshing myself by reading the first three again?

Two kill two birds with one stone, the answer is yes.

While not everybody will want to just pick the book up and dive in after three months, the way the Hastings has been crafting the story over three almost standalone issues means that while there are some elements that cross the four issues, the specific events don’t need to have been memorized to enjoy Quantum and Woody #4 (though if you do want a refresher, there’s no reason not to go back and read the other three).

Hastings has once again packed a full story, start middle and end, into a single comic, though with the finale he also wraps up the threads he had left over the course of the previous three issues. It is in many ways a bitter sweet comic, because as far as we currently know, there aren’t any plans to bring Hastings back to Quantum and Woody, but he ends his story on a high note without leaving any real loose ends dangling – but you’ll be wanting more from him and the creative team by them time you turn the final page.

Browne’s art has been perfectly suited to the chaos that has been this series, and both he and Redmond shine in the final issue. There’s often a lot occurring on every page, but the comic never loses its ability to tell a coherent visual story. The art is bright, bold, absolutely insane, and I love it. There’s a lot going on in almost every page, but you’re never lost; this is a book that you’re going to want to take your time reading, or read it a second time so that you can really appreciate the talent on display here.

I’ve never really been the biggest Quantum and Woody fan, but Hastings, Brown, Redmond, and letterer Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou have delivered one of my favourite series this year. This is a nigh-on perfect comic book in its own right, but when you take it as the final part of a four-part miniseries, then it becomes an absolute must-read book.

If every comic that I read after Diamond started delivering again was half as good as this, I’d be happy.

Story: Christopher Hastings Art: Ryan Browne
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Story: 9.6 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Quantum & Woody #4 (of 4)

QUANTUM & WOODY #4 (of 4)

Written by CHRISTOPHER HASTINGS
Art by RYAN BROWNE
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Cover B by RAHZZAH
Preorder Cover by GURIHIRU
Extra Virgin Variant Cover by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale JULY 8th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US |T+

Home Alone, the boys are left to defend their lair against would-be bandits!
What is Woody’s dark secret? The truth is finally revealed in the miniseries finale!

QUANTUM & WOODY #4 (of 4)

Review: Quantum and Woody #4

QUANTUM & WOODY #4

Home Alone, the boys are left to defend their lair against would-be bandits! What is Woody’s dark secret? The truth is finally revealed in Quantum and Woody #4!

The finale to the four-part miniseries finds writer Christopher Hastings, artist Ryan Browne, and color artist Ruth Redmond coming together one more time (though hopefully not for the final time) for a comic I have waited nearly three months to read. Was it worth the wait? Was I able to just pick it up and enjoy it without refreshing myself by reading the first three again?

Two kill two birds with one stone, the answer is yes.

While not everybody will want to just pick the book up and dive in after three months, the way the Hastings has been crafting the story over three almost standalone issues means that while there are some elements that cross the four issues, the specific events don’t need to have been memorized to enjoy Quantum and Woody #4 (though if you do want a refresher, there’s no reason not to go back and read the other three).

Hastings has once again packed a full story, start middle and end, into a single comic, though with the finale he also wraps up the threads he had left over the course of the previous three issues. It is in many ways a bitter sweet comic, because as far as we currently know, there aren’t any plans to bring Hastings back to Quantum and Woody, but he ends his story on a high note without leaving any real loose ends dangling – but you’ll be wanting more from him and the creative team by them time you turn the final page.

Browne’s art has been perfectly suited to the chaos that has been this series, and both he and Redmond shine in the final issue. There’s often a lot occurring on every page, but the comic never loses its ability to tell a coherent visual story. The art is bright, bold, absolutely insane, and I love it. There’s a lot going on in almost every page, but you’re never lost; this is a book that you’re going to want to take your time reading, or read it a second time so that you can really appreciate the talent on display here.

I’ve never really been the biggest Quantum and Woody fan, but Hastings, Brown, Redmond, and letterer Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou have delivered one of my favourite series this year. This is a nigh-on perfect comic book in its own right, but when you take it as the final part of a four-part miniseries, then it becomes an absolute must-read book.

If every comic that I read after Diamond started delivering again was half as good as this, I’d be happy.

Story: Christopher Hastings Art: Ryan Browne
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Story: 9.6 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Exclusive: Christopher Hastings Talks Quantum and Woody Plus an Exclusive Look at issue 4!

Quantum & Woody is the world’s worst, to us one of the best, superhero teams. Fans will be able to get their hands on the finale to the current volume, Quantum & Woody #4, on July 8 with the final order cut off on June 15th from writer Christopher Hastings, artist Ryan Browne, colors by Ruth Redmond, and lettering by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou.

Home Alone, the boys are left to defend their lair against would-be bandits! What is Woody’s dark secret? The truth is finally revealed!

Quantum & Woody #4

Writer Christopher Hastings talked to us about the series and we have an exclusive first look at the final issue.

Graphic Policy: Before we get started, I’ve got to warn you that the first three issues have been some of my favorite comics from the last year. I’m really enjoying the approach you’re taking with the story and the characters; how did you end up writing the World’s Worst superheroes?

Christopher Hastings: Well, thank you very much! I’ve been a lifetime fan of these characters, and it’s a massive honor to contribute to their ongoing story. As for how I wound up writing them, that’s all on our editor, Heather Antos. Heather was my editor on Unbelievable Gwenpool, and thank goodness it seems like I did a good enough job that she thought I would be good for Valiant’s best action-comedy characters.

GP: As I read the first three issues, I’ve noticed that the creative team has been in a groove from the first page. Did you know any of the creative team prior to the first issue?

CH: As our scheduling went, I don’t think we actually had our full team set by the time I finished the script for the fourth issue, which is unusual. Heather and Valiant really did me a kindness as far as getting the story down well ahead of time, which allowed us all to really make sure that the story across all the issues is cohesive. That said, Ryan Browne and I came up in a similar time of webcomics, and I think we always had similar sensibilities, so when Heather suggested putting us together, it was a no-brainer. Ryan and I are two celestial objects that have been in a decaying orbit for years, and Quantum and Woody is the project where we finally collided.

GP: How does working with Valiant differ from working with other publishers?

CH: I think the biggest thing is how much I’ve been able to get to know the sales and marketing folks. These are the people who take my insane little fantasies and have to get them into comic shops. It’s been a really wonderful experience getting to talk to them on a regular basis, take road trips to signings with them, and just get to see what that side of the comics industry looks like. It’s easy for the writer of a comic to be removed from the whole picture, but with Valiant, I feel like I get to be along for the whole trip, from inception to every individual reader.

GP: Do you approach writing for an ongoing series differently than a miniseries?

CH: Certainly! If I know a miniseries is 4 issues, I’m not going to introduce something in issue 2 that I’ll “pick up later”. When I write, I’m really conscious of the beats of various plots, and I want to make sure there is room for all of them. I don’t want to do a beat 1 and 2 if I can’t do a 3.

Quantum & Woody #4

GP: Each issue so far has essentially been a self-contained story; did the series initially set out that way, or did it evolve as you were writing?

CH: This was probably my top priority/artistic goal when I got the chance to even just pitch for Quantum & Woody. I miss episodic comics, and I wanted to make a real effort at putting them out myself. A comedy is especially well suited for this style of serialized storytelling. Drop in for a particularly funny issue, even if you haven’t read the previous! You can watch any episode of Cheers without seeing another one. Why can’t we do that in comics? I’ve also read just about every comic Marvel put out in the 60s thanks to their Essential collections, and it was the same there. If it’s good enough for Stan Lee, it’s good enough for me.

GP: Can you talk a little about your inspiration behind Woody’s “disguise” in the first issue? I thought that the sewer sequence was a great reminder to not see what you wanted to see.

CH: Clark Kent can convince people he isn’t Superman with a dumpy suit, glasses, and his hair parted on the other side of his head. Why can’t Woody?

GP: You’ve been using the brother’s powers in unique ways throughout the series; do you ever feel you’re in danger of making them competent heroes?

CH: Haha, no I think they are far enough down on the ability ladder that it left some room for them to get a little better without totally destroying their entire deal. That said, one of my favorite things in comedy is when the all around idiot happens to show off the one tiny thing they are good at. A little bit of competence goes a long way as far as character likability goes.

Quantum & Woody #4

GP: Ryan Browne’s linework and layouts have been really exciting at times in this book, especially around the ice-skating scene. I’m always interested in how much direction writers give to artists in scenes such as those. Did it come out how you expected?

CH: Ryan is in my favorite class of artist where he can look at a fairly specific, panel-by-panel, shot-by-shot written out script, see what I’m *actually* trying to communicate, and make changes from the script to do it better, punching up the whole thing. Ryan gets down everything important in the story, and then he just PEPPERS the rest of it with a million fun extra things. It makes the book a very satisfying one to reread several times, honestly.

GP: Was there anything you wanted to include in this series, but had to end up saving it for the next?

CH: I have SO MANY ideas for what I would want to do with Quantum and Woody after this. I sure hope I get the chance. Fingers crossed x1M.

GP: If you could write any other Valiant character, who would it be?

CH: Top choice is easily Archer & Armstrong. Such a great premise, great world, infinite potential for hijinks. Close for second place is Ninjak, just because I am a long time fan. And third place, I’d love to do Bloodshot like an 80s action movie.

GP: Thanks so much for answering our questions!


Check out the exclusive preview below!

Review: Quantum and Woody #3

Quantum and Woody #3

Quantum and Woody are back in high school – this time to solve a murder!
But are their combined powers a match for the haunts that await them? Find out in Quantum and Woody #3!

When I read this comic the first time verses the second time, a lot had changed. And it changed my appreciation of the comic, too. It went from being a fun diversion to a life raft.

Y’see, because my wife has lung issues, we’re effectively in quarantine already, and so I was in desperate need of a distraction. Even having read this book once, the second time through still allowed me to escape for just long enough to reset myself. So judging this book critically will be tough but then sometimes you just have to judge a book in the moment. And in this moment Quantum & Woody #3 was perfect.

Written by Christopher Hastings, with art by Ryan Browne and colors by Ruth Redmond, this book was everything I didn’t know I needed. Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed it the first time I read it; this isn’t a comic that went from average to amazing simply because I read it after a tumultuous weekend.

Hastings has once again packed a full story, start middle and end, into a single comic. He has so far given us three complete stories in three issues that have all tied together with elements that are bound to come together in the finale next month whenever the fourth issue comes out. It isn’t often you get as much story in a comic as you have with Quantum & Woody #3 these days, which is a refreshing change of pace and it feels like you’re getting far more than you’re paying for in comparison to other books.

Browne’s art is absolutely perfect for this comic; there’s an energy to his line work that jumps from the page. Whether it’s Quantum punching somebody or Woody running out of a panel this comic has a lot to look at at, and Browne is able to make the art tell a complete story despite how much is happening between the covers. His art flows and makes sense. There’s no need to make a logic jump from panel to panel (you know how when you’re reading a comic and all of a sudden it feels like you missed a panel or two? That’s not here), which is a testament to Browne’s ability to tell a story visually.

Ruth Redmond has the unenviable job of coloring the insanity taking place in this comic, and does so in a way that nothing is lost on the page. Quantum & Woody #3 is a bright book because of Redmond’s vibrant colors as much as the story itself.

I also want to highlight Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou‘s lettering in this book. Hastings has a lot of words in this comic, and Otsmane-Elhaou’s work is so spot on to be almost unnoticeable. I say almost, because once I noticed his lettering because of the sound effects. I realized just how impressive the work is in this comic. Read the book, then read it again paying attention to the lettering and you’ll see what I mean; the font choices, the sizing and the sound effects are perfect for this book.

I don’t know when we’ll get to read the fourth issue at this point, and just typing that sucks. We’re all living in a time that few of us ever expected. Things have changed on us overnight. If you need a moment of brightness, a distraction from the news, then the third issue of this series is ideal for that.

It’s absolutely a perfect way to distract yourself. It’s a pretty stand alone book you can enjoy this without reading the first two issues. I’m going to be reading those three comics a lot over the coming months. Join me, won’t you?

Story: Christopher Hastings Art: Ryan Browne
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Story: 9.2 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Quantum and Woody #3

QUANTUM AND WOODY #3

Written by CHRISTOPHER HASTINGS
Art by RYAN BROWNE
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Cover B by CASPAR WIJNGAARD
Cover C by WILL ROBSON
Pre-Order Edition Cover by STEVE LIEBER
Cover E 1/20 “Extra Virgin” Variant by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale MARCH 25 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Quantum & Woody are back in high school – this time to solve a murder!
But are their combined powers a match for the haunts that await them?

QUANTUM AND WOODY #3

Review: Quantum and Woody #2

Quantum and Woody #2

The world’s worst superheroes unleash brand-new superpowers in Quantum and Woody #2! Can Woody’s new visions of the future be trusted when it leads the duo to face their arch-rival DOCTOR TOILET?!

(No, they most certainly cannot.)

Sometimes you read a comic that you’re expecting to be average because you’ve decided that you need to read everything that a certain publisher or series puts out. Over the years I’ve read almost every Valiant comic I could get my hands on. Some are far better than others. There are always the odd one or two that take me entirely by surprise. I hoped that I’d enjoy Christopher Hastings Quantum & Woody. I had no idea that with a single issue it’d take me by the ankles and rip the rug out from under me.

The first issue struck such a chord that I’ve been waiting for this issue for what feels like months and not weeks. Hastings, artist Ryan Browne, and colorist Ruth Redmond have been able to capture something that I’ve often missed in American comics. Quantum and Woody delivers a quintessentially British feeling. I’m aware that none of the creators are British. They’ve been able to capture the spirit of comics like weekly anthology comic 2000A.D. For me that’s a huge plus. I was always amazed at how much was crammed into the short space in the anthology’s stories, and the same is very true here.

Hastings has packed a full story, start middle and end, that could have easily been spread across multiple issues. Probably at least four to six if it was a bi-weekly comic from a certain dedicated company. Even so, the issue doesn’t feel like the story is being stretched thin. Which isn’t to say this comic is too packed; between Hasting’s writing and the art of Browne and Redmond this comic strikes the perfect balance.

Where the first issue reintroduced us to the brothers and their relationship this issue focuses on their attempt to become legitimate superheroes by attacking an ice dancer. It’s as glorious as it sounds. But this also gives us one of the best sequences in the series so far with Woody sliding through the panels which only adds to the chaos of the brothers and the ice dancer on the page. Visually, this is a great example of why comics are such a unique medium; Browne is able to turn what is essentially a sight gag into the border of the panels while highlighting the frantic pace of the page.

It’s a simple trick, but it’s impact cannot be denied. You simply can’t do this in any other medium.

I’ll make no apologies for the love-letter to Quantum & Woody #2 that this review has become. I frankly don’t care. This comic is utterly fantastic in every way. Genuinely gutted that we’re only getting four issues of this creative team at this point, but these four issues are on pace to be some of the best comics featuring the World’s Worst superheroes I’ve ever read.

Story: Christopher Hastings Art: Ryan Browne
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Story: 9.2 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Quantum and Woody #1

QUANTUM AND WOODY #2

Written by CHRISTOPHER HASTINGS
Art by RYAN BROWNE
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Cover B by JOE QUINONES
Cover C by REILLY BROWN
Pre-Order Edition Cover by TODD NAUCK
Cover E 1/20 “Extra Virgin” Variant by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale FEBRUARY 26 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

The world’s worst superheroes unleash brand-new superpowers!
But can Woody’s new visions of the future be trusted when it leads the duo to face their arch-rival DOCTOR TOILET?!
(No, they most certainly cannot.)

QUANTUM AND WOODY #2
Almost American
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