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Review: Man-Bat #3

Man-Bat #3

Man-Bat has been an interesting issue through its three issues. The series has been an exploration of Kirk Langstrom and the good and bad as far as his time as Man-Bat. Kirk has lofty goals with good in mind. But, his drive has lead to nothing but disaster and heartbreak. Man-Bat #3 emphasizes that in multiple ways and leaves you feeling some sympathy for the character.

Dave Wielgosz gives us the story of a man whose heart is in the right place. Driven by his sister’s hearing impairment Kirk has focused on hearing in his career in hopes of bringing her hearing back. But, that delivers some problematic issues as it implies she’s “broken to be fixed”. His heart is there but he doesn’t consider his action’s impact on others. This issue opens with Harley Quinn talking to Kirk and Man-Bat about all of that and that he has some issues with women as a whole. It’s an interesting diagnosis and observation that weighs on the reader as the issue progresses. We see Kirk’s ex-wife and meet his sister. Each segment feels like it ties back to what Harley had to say. You feel sorry for Kirk in some ways because he’s trying to do the right thing and is talented, he just has some clear issues in the way of really helping society. There’s a tragedy to it all.

Wielgosz also uses Man-Bat #3 to start to bring together the bigger issue. The debut had the theft of a sonic weapon as its focus. We now get a better idea as to the why of it all and things get interesting due to that. And where it goes works as it also continues the focus on Kirk and his issues as well. The broader story plays into the comics’ exploration of Man-Bat and Kirk.

The art by Sumit Kumar is really good. There’s some comedy within the horror. The comic really does a great mix of things in visual tone and it all works together. Romulo Fajardo, Jr.‘s color and lettering by Tom Napolitano helps bring it all together. There’s some action, there’s some horror, there’s some comedy as well. Then there’s the heartache through it all as well. The characters really deliver when it comes to that so you can feel their sadness.

Man-Bat #3 is a great issue that really brings together the focus of the comic on Man-Bat’s tragedy and the conflict. It all works really well as well. It doesn’t feel force and it comes together in a generally natural way. It should be interesting where it all goes as we’re lead to believe that time is ticking for Man-Bat. With just a few issues left in the series, there could be a lot more tragedy to come.

Story: Dave Wielgosz Art: Sumit Kumar
Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 7.95 Art: 7.95 Overall: 7.95 Recommendation: Read

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Review: Justice League #59

Justice League #59

Although the Rebirth numbering is intact, both the Justice League and Justice League Dark titles get a bit of relaunch in Justice League #59. Brian Michael Bendis, David Marquez, and Tamra Bonvillain bring large scale action and a sequel to Bendis, David Walker, and Jamal Campbell’s Naomi in the lead story. While in the backup “Justice League Dark” story, Ram V, Xermanico, and Romulo Fajardo Jr. tap something a little more mystical as Merlin makes his return, and John Constantine and Zatanna investigate cults and prophecies in rural New Mexico. One of these strives to be modern mythology with all of the biggest toys in the DC Universe toy box while the other one might actually succeed with its riffs on Arthurian legends, the conflict between Heaven and Hell, and the senselessness of human existence underneath it all.

Justice League #59 is a 20 page story, but it feels a lot shorter thanks to an abundance of double page spreads from artist David Marquez. He and Brian Michael Bendis throw readers right into the middle of the fray as a mysterious interdimensional invader named Brutus lands in Kahndaq and confronts its king and protector, Black Adam. This later escalates into a kind of, sort of team-up between Adam and some of the members of the Justice League, which doesn’t thrill a monarch that is more into isolation than cooperation. However, this tension only really shows up towards the end of the battle when Black Adam immediately ejects the Justice League from his land and finally towards the end of the story. Having Black Adam has a wild card is Bendis’ smartest plotting decision, and he definitely fits Green Arrow’s idea of a “dissenting voice” when Oliver talks to the other members about doing “more” as a team.

But, for the most part, this initial Justice League story is lots of punching against a villain that is generically enough called “Brutus”, and the only interesting thing about him is that he’s most likely from Naomi’s home world giving her a reason to appear in the comic beyond being a Bendis co-creation. If you’re familiar with Bendis’ run on the Superman books, there’s a Rogol Zaar vibe to him in that he’s not an interesting character except in his connections to pre-existing characters or lore. You can definitely tell that he’s going to be forgettable character when he decides to peace out in the middle of the battle through an interdimensional portal before

Justice League #59 doesn’t really much to draw readers in beyond being a kind of sequel to the excellent Naomi comic, but it does have its bright spots. David Marquez and Tamra Bonvillain really embrace the wide screen nature of the book and make a middling script gorgeous with Bonvillain contributing deep blues to the bubble-shaped panels when Aquaman and his army of sharks battle Brutus. She also uses really intense red and blues to match Marquez’s speed lines as Superman and Black Adam race to grab Brutus before he disappears. This page is pretty busy, but it drives home the point that Black Adam thinks he’s beyond the Justice League and doesn’t respect Superman unlike the other heroes. (Even the edgy, cocky Green Arrow just wants Superman to agree with him.)

Justice League #59

To go along with the blockbuster visuals, Brian Michael Bendis’ writing is at its best when characters are ribbing or arguing with each other a la New Avengers. He seems to have a lot of fun with Green Arrow and Black Canary, who debate both sides of the Justice League’s current status quo and adds a little extra reverence when Superman opens his mouth. Superman also takes lead during the fight scenes, and you can tell he’s the team leader without any kind of exposition about it. We’ll see what Bendis does with them in future issues, but for now, Flash and Hawkgirl are exposition spouters while Batman just reacts to things. As the one non-powered hero during the fight scene, he may have been trying to make Batman a POV character, but few readers can react to an (ex) billionaire and genius strategist/martial artist. Thankfully, Naomi is coming soon to fill this role, and hopefully, she brings a hook too.

Ram V and Xermanico’s “Justice League Dark” doesn’t have a problem with hooks and opens with the return of Merlin to the mortal plane. If you’ve read V’s work on Future State: Justice League, then you know that his take on the mythical wizard is more nefarious than kindly, and Merlin definitely sets himself up as the Big Bad in the pages of this issue. His actions on the final pages definitely set up a need for a Justice League type of team to take him down as Xermanico’s lovely cathedral window layouts and Fajardo’s warm color palette turns bloody and scarlet. Also, V logically connects the John Constantine/Zatanna plot to Merlin’s rise through the appearance of a fan favorite character and basically shows that their mission was just a symptom of a larger disease. It’s tension and escalation all in ten pages.

However, as well as setting up a big-time enemy for this disassembled team to face, Ram V and Xermanico still find time to explore the relationship between John Constantine and Zatanna. There’s a real softness to their interactions even as Constantine does his usual con man hijinks to get them out of a bind as the narration goes slightly nihilistic and focuses on humanity’s stupidity and willingness to place their lives in religions and cults while there’s literally bigger fish to fry. I love how Constantine cares about Zatanna’s feelings after the loss of her father and the disbandment of Justice League Dark, and Xermanico shows this through a beat panel where their hands nearly touch. Constantine and Zatanna will never be a stable couple, but V and Xermanico know they have great chemistry and use it to carry this initial installment of “Justice League Dark” because while Merlin is quite metal, we need someone to root for.

Thanks to a one-dimensional baddie and the usual Brian Michael Bendis decompression issues, Justice League #59 only gets a slight recommendation for me. However, David Marquez and Tamra Bonvillain’s take on DC’s A-list is truly awe-inspiring, and their Black Adam exudes power and contempt as well. Hopefully, there’s more Naomi, Green Arrow, and Black Canary in future issues and less alien punching bag. But the real reason this comic crosses the line from trade wait to a purchase is Ram V, Xermanico, and Romulo Fajardo’s “Justice League Dark” backup, which features both Arthurian legends and supernatural hijinks and has a formidable villain plus witty, yet emotionally honest writing for its leads, John Constantine and Zatanna.

Story: Brian Michael Bendis, Ram V Art: David Marquez, Xermanico
Colors: Tamra Bonvillain, Romulo Fajardo Jr. Letters: Josh Reed, Rob Leigh
Story: 7.1 Art: 8.5 Overall: 7.8 Recommendation: Buy

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Review: The Joker #1

The Joker #1

When I first heard DC was releasing a comic focused on the Joker, I rolled my eyes. The concept of a comic with the Joker at the center didn’t appeal to me, as certain iterations of him have attracted a negative edge-lord element. Then I read The Joker #1, and quickly changed my mind. What’s presented is an updated “chase” story with some zeitgeist thrown in.

The “Joker War” is over and the Joker is on the run having left Gotham. Months later, an attack has taken place on Arkham Asylum pinned to him, though not proven it was him. Unknown elements have decided they want the Joker off the playing board and decide to turn to Jim Gordon to do exactly that.

While Joker’s name might be the title of the comic, writer James Tynion IV focuses the comic on a former cop whose nightmare still walks the Earth and haunts his dreams. This is a story about a man’s unfulfilled mission and one last opportunity to change that. While we get an update on the Joker, this is Gordon’s story so far.

And Tynion gives us an interesting flair to it. The comic feels more like Nazi hunters than a detective story. This isn’t so much INTERPOL as it is Wiesenthal. The fact Gordon is focused on taking out such an evil contributes to that, it’s rare that a character is so definitively evil. Gordon feels like the grizzled, tortured individual, who needs to put an end note to what has haunted him, and remove an evil force from society.

The art by Guillem March is solid. Guillem is joined by Arif Prianto on color and Tom Napolitano on lettering. There’s a worn vibe about the comic. Gordon feels like a tortured and weathered individual beat down to a low point and not sure what to do next. There’s a great use of visuals to dive in what haunts Gordon and where Gotham stands in the wake of the latest chaos. An opening sequence involving another officer really hammers home the drive that Gordon is experiencing toeing the line of crossing into shock value.

The Joker #1 also features a secondary story “Punchline” following up on Joker’s latest sidekick’s trial. Tynion is joined by Sam Johns on the story while Mirka Andolfo handles the art, Romulo Fajardo, Jr. is on color, and Ariana Maher handles the lettering. Much like the one-shot featuring Punchline, this chapter has a feel like it’s an examination of our current world. Punchline is the center of the alt-cult she and Joker have spawned. This is a group that rejects reality and social norms, instead bracing chaos as a finger towards others. It’s hard to not think of the MAGA-cult and alt-right when reading this and the comparing the protests to free Punchline as similar pronunciations of innocence for real-world leaders who are clearly guilty though the evidence may be flimsy. How much this story will continue to make that sort of connection will be interesting as it could be a hell of an allegory.

The Joker #1 surprised me. It’s a comic I thought could be good but wasn’t sure what we were getting. With a focus on those hunting the villain, we get a story of one last attempt at justice as opposed to something that might deify or wash a reprehensible individual. It’s a debut that shows a hell of a lot of potential for what’s to come. Hopefully it keeps its focus on the nightmares that haunt us throughout life.

Story: James Tynion IV, Sam Johns Art: Guillem March, Mirka Andolfo
Color: Arif Prianto, Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letterer: Tom Napolitano, Ariana Maher
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

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Review: Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4

Games Workshop’s world of Warhammer 40,000 comes to Marvel comics with Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar!

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 takes us to the past to show what it takes to become a Space Marine and in the present Marneus battles Chaos forces!

Story: Kieron Gillen
Art: Jacen Burrows
Ink: Guillermo Ortego
Color: Java Tartaglia
Letterer: Clayton Cowles

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

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Review: Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4

What does it take to be a Space Marine in the Warhammer 40,000 universe? Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 answers that question in a comic that focuses more on the warrior’s growth than the battle currently waging. The series has been an interesting one doing a solid job of mixing two eras for its main character Marneus Calgar. Through his battles in the present, he reflects on what it took for him to become the leader he is today. And through the past, we get to see more of the world and his difficult journey.

In the past Tacitan, now Marneus, has helped defeat a Chaos cult and is going through the trails to join the ranks of the Ultramarines Space Marine chapter. writer Kieron Gillen does an excellent job showing how difficult a task it is as the bodies pile up and Marneus goes through a torturous transformation. It’s been years since I read up on all of the specifics of the augments that go into being a Space Marine, but Gillen takes us step-by-step. It feels like an update to the rather dry spec-readouts I remember reading as a fan of the Warhammer 40K miniature game. Organs are added and training is done and through it all we get to see Marneus grow, literally.

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 does an impressive job of taking what has been told so many times before and making it interesting. There’s been a lot written as to the various upgrades in Space Marines but Gillen breaks it down as to what those upgrades are, when they’re given, why they’re given, and what the gains are. He does that through Marneus’ training in the field. For new readers, some of it might be surprising as things like acid spit and the ability to gain memories through the consumption of others are presented. And it all just flows without a hint of silliness.

In the present, Marneus battles the Chaos forces. The blood flows with somewhat comedic effect. The art by Jacen Burrows works well this issue delivering an over the top experience. The training scenes, especially towards the beginning are full of chaos at times as the numbers dwindle due to death. The present battle we see heads up and bodies crushed under tanks. Whether it’s meant as a comedic spin, I don’t know. But, it’s over the top and hard to not enjoy it in that way. Java Tartaglia‘s colors deliver some of the fun in rather bright colors and Clayton Cowles‘ lettering the right touch for the calls of Chaos warriors.

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 is a fun comic that feels like a nice updated take on a “field guide”. We get to see what it takes to be a Space Marine step by step. And we get a lot action in both the past and present. It works really well to educate people about this new new world and property and entertain at the same time.

Story: Kieron Gillen Art: Jacen Burrows
Ink: Guillermo Ortego Color: Java Tartaglia Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

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Review: Man-Bat #1

Man-Bat #1

Man-Bat isn’t a character I know a lot about beyond the basics. I understand the concept of a scientist whose formula goes astray and turns him into a giant bat. There are some altruistic motivations as to why the formula was created, but it goes wrong. Instead, the scientist becomes addicted to their formula. It’s a concept played out over and over. I wasn’t sure what could be told that’d stand out, but Man-Bat #1 delivers an intriguing debut to the series that delivers a lot of potential.

Written by Dave Wielgosz, Man-Bat #1 delivers a comic that acts as a solid introduction to the character as well as the next chapter for long-time fans. Kirk Langstrom is still obsessed in his quest to perfect his formula with hopes of helping those who are hard of hearing. But, that formula still has its issues, as it has turned Langstrom into Man-Bat in the past. His obsession and focus has destroyed his relationship with Francine who is tired of watching Kirk love the formula more than her.

In the opening of Man-Bat #1 we’re hit hard with witnessing a man whose obsession has destroyed his life. This is addiction front and center creating a comic that’s an interesting allegory for those experiences. After a solid action sequence we get to the meat of the story, that after years of abuse, Langstrom is dying due to the formula. Man-Bat, his inner demon, is killing him. There’s little he can do beyond a miracle which opens up the question if he should accept his fate, fight to prevent it, or go out high… literally.

Man-Bat #1 is a not so thin look at drug addiction with the main character struggling to get literally high. We even get an enabler to the addiction in Batman who comes to a decision to no longer help Kirk in his spiral. No more excuses, Batman needs to act. It’s an interesting twist to Batman. While we often think of his role in putting individuals behind bars, here he treats Langstrom as a drug addict who should seek treatment instead of time behind bars. But, his actions have crossed a line reflecting a real-world debate between rehabilitation and incarceration.

Sumit Kumar‘s art is fantastic. Joined by Romulo Fajardo, Jr. on color and Tom Napolitano on lettering, the comic balances action and emotional moments. The opening is a solid drama, focused on the emotional fallout between characters. Something we experience later with Batman delivering the news to Langstrom and Kirk realizing his fate. Mixed in between is action as Man-Bat attempts to prove he can do good like Batman himself. There’s some great mimicry in images between the two characters as well enhancing the reflection of them.

Each character has an obsession, an addiction, as they pursue their goals. Batman and Man-Bat are similar in many ways. As the comic highlights, one is going down a monster driven dark path. The other journeys down a dark path full of monsters. Man-Bat #1 is a solid debut with an interesting underlying aspect to it about drug addiction. There’s a lot there and hopefully we get more of the thinly veiled story, it creates an interesting twist to the character.

Story: Dave Wielgosz Art: Sumit Kumar
Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

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Exclusive Preview: Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 (of 5)

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 (of 5)

Writer: Kieron Gillen
Penciler: Jacen Burrows
Inker: Guillermo Ortego
Colorist: Java Tartaglia
Letterer: VC’s Clayton Cowles
Designer: VC’s Joe Sabino
Cover: James Stokoe
Variant: Luke Ross, Arif Prianto; Mico Suayan, Romulo Fajardo, Jr.
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Feb 03, 2021
SRP: $4.99

THE MAKING OF A SPACE MARINE!
• Young MARNEUS CALGAR has passed his Space Marine Aspirant testing…but that means the real trial is only just beginning!
• As Marneus undergoes the rigorous training, excruciating organ implantation and strenuous physical augmentation, he will have to prove that, against all odds, he has what it takes!
• And in the 41st Millennium, the assault on CALGAR ESTATES reaches a deadly climax!

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #4 (of 5)

Review: Future State: Justice League #1

Future State: Justice League #1

Future State: Justice League #1 is an interesting comic. There’s a lot to like about it. But, there’s also a lot to be frustrated by as well. There’s two stories and each has their strengths and weaknesses.

Joshua Williamson handles the writing duties for the first story focused on the Justice League of the future. With a new Superman, Green Lantern, Batman, The Flash, Aquawoman, and Wonder Woman, the comic gives us familiar characters but new takes. It also delivers an interesting new status quo in some ways.

In Future State: Justice League #1, the Legion of Doom has been murdered leaving the Justice League to figure out who did it. Roles aren’t quite as straightforward as one might expect changing up some of the expectations for the team. There’s also a new dynamic in that this is a team that doesn’t know each other’s identities. We’re told of some major events in the past that has lead to that but it doesn’t hamper the story. There are some hints as to what has happened but it doesn’t linger in the details. We’re absolutely left wanting more but it’s not the focus brought up over and over.

Instead, Williamson focuses on the lasting reverberations of the past and how they impact this new team. There’s a discussion if these heroes should be hampered by the ghosts of the past. That’s really interesting and I wish there was more of it. Sadly, it’s all cut short as the real villains are revealed. A group I have no connection to so I was left shrugging my shoulders.

The art by Robson Rocha is fantastic. Daniel Henriques is on ink, Romulo Fajardo, Jr. is on color, and Tom Napolitano on lettering. There’s solid page layouts and the design and look of the characters are great. The comic had me looking at the art and pages to check out the details and dissect the look of the comic. It just looks really good and has a good pacing despite much of the comic is standing around and chatting.

The comic also features a Justice League Dark story, “Prophéties“. It’s written by Ram V., with art by Marcio Takara, color by Marcelo Maiolo, and lettering by Rob Leigh. Here we’re given a different future where magic users are under attack. It’s a wasteland post-apocalyptic world where instead of a lot of what we’ve seen elsewhere, this one is more sword and sorcery. Zatanna and Bobo are attempting to figure out what has happened as they also do what they can to survive. Merlin has returned taking the magic and hunting down users and murdering them.

It’s an interesting story that has a nice blending of settings. Where it goes and what’s revealed has me wanting to find out more and see what’s next. But, it also feels like a story arc that’s a bit of a filler between bigger arcs. It’s not bad, it doesn’t quite hit the mark with its big moments.

Future State: Justice League #1 is an ok comic. It’s not bad. It’s also not exciting enough. Both stories have their moments and interesting aspects. But, the Justice League characters are a bit more interesting in their own “Future State” series. The Justice League Dark story packs a lot in but misses that punch to really make it exciting. This is one for those who really want to see more of these characters or worlds.

Story: Joshua Williamson, Ram V. Art: Robson Rocha, Marcio Takara
Ink: Daniel Henriques Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr., Marcelo Maiolo Letterer: Tom Napolitano, Rob Leigh
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

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Man-Bat’s Murderous Meltdown Begins in Man-Bat #1 this February

In the battle between man and monster…the monster’s winning! Man-Bat, a five-issue series starring the long-running Batman antagonist, debuts in February from the creative team of writer Dave Wielgosz and artist Sumit Kumar!

For years Kirk Langstrom has struggled with his monstrous alter ego Man-Bat and the serum that transformed him. But he’s finally hit rock bottom following a devastating setback, and he’s going to take out his anger on every single citizen of Gotham City. Will the combined might of Batman and the GCPD be enough to stop Langstrom once and for all? Or will this just be the start of Man-Bat’s devastation?

Take a look at the first seven pages of interior artwork from Man-Bat #1, where Man-Bat’s murderous meltdown begins!

And in the following issues, Man-Bat is on the run from the law following a horrific night of blood and mayhem on the streets of Gotham City. But the police aren’t what Kirk Langstrom’s monstrous alter ego should worry about… it’s Task Force X, better known as the Suicide Squad! To undo the damage he has caused, Man-Bat must seek a cure for the innocents he has injured, all while staying out of the deadly sights of the world’s most dangerous mercenaries!

Man-Bat #1written by Dave Wielgosz with art by Sumit Kumar, Romulo Fajardo Jr., and Tom Napolitano, arrives in stores on February 2 with a main cover by Kyle Hotz and Alejandro Sánchez and a variant cover by Kevin Nowlan.

Review: Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Dark Nights Metal #1

Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Dark Nights Metal #1

And with that, it seems like Tales From the Dark Multiverse has come to an end. For a while now, DC Comics has been delivering entertaining one-shots. Tales from the Dark Multiverse has given us “dark” takes on classic events of the DC Universe. The comics generally entertained with some stronger than others. The concept as a whole was a fun idea that delivered a bit of “what if?” with an Elseworlds feel. Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Dark Nights Metal #1 seems to wrap up the concept with a Dark Multiverse version of Dark Nights: Metal.

The original Dark Nights: Metal was written by Scott Snyder. Snyder has a story credit along with writers Collin Kelly and Jackson Lanzing. Tales From the Dark Multiverse has been presented and framed by Tempus Fungnaut. Fugnaut’s a being whose role is search “the dark for a single spark of light”. Through the stories presented there has been lots of death and destruction and little hope. This issue attempts to deliver that as a group of heroes make a stand against Barbatos and his twisted “dragons”.

What’s interesting is Kelly and Lanzing deliver a take on Snyder’s concepts that’s a little bit easier to understand. Though the story is rather compressed, it does a good explanation of the villain Barbatos’ creation and the general events of the real Dark Nights: Metal.

Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Dark Nights Metal #1 is the final stand against Barbatos with the final Justice League battling it out. Who remains is interesting and while there are hints at how they’ve remained the comic could have been helped by being expanded. Like so many of the Tales From the Dark Multiverse, the issue is worthy of being a miniseries or even more expanded issue or graphic novel. The comic is a bit too compressed in that way. Some great concepts that I’d love to see more of.

The comic also does a lot more on the “metal” concept. Snyder and the team of creators he’s worked with have often talked about the musical aspects of their two events. The events take on a “metal” attitude but neither has really played heavily on that concept. Here, it’s leaned into heavily with one weapon being a guitar reminiscent of guitar blasters of the past. Within one character we get more of the “metal” attitude than the whole of both of the real events this riffs off of.

The art by Karl Mostert is interesting. Mostert is joined by Trevor Scott and Norm Rapmund on ink, Romulo Fajardo, Jr. on color, and Andworld Design on lettering. Some of the design reminded me of the video game Brutal Legend but overall, there’s some solid concepts in characters and the world. There’s a death and destruction of it all without it being overly dark and depressed. The opening of the comic features a great use of panels and a character running from one to another. It helps speed along the story and really nails home what’s going on. The design of the comic overall has a very “rock and roll” feel about it while still delivering bright colors evoking a little bit of 70s van art in a good way.

Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Dark Nights Metal #1’s ending would lead me to believe this series of one-shots is done which is a shame. It provided an interesting outlet for creators to deliver something different, infusing a darker/horror/twisted take on classic DC stories. Who knows what lies on the other side of Dark Nights: Death Metal but here’s hoping it leaves space to explore more of the idea and let us see the adventures of The Final Knight.

Story: Scott Snyder, Jackson Lanzing, Collin Kelly Writers: Jackson Lanzing, Collin Kelly
Art: Karl Mostert Ink: Trevor Scott, Norm Rapmund
Color: Romulo Fajardo Jr. Letterer: Andworld Design
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

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