Tag Archives: rise of the teenage mutant ninja turtles

Preview: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Rise of the TMNT #1 (of 2)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Rise of the TMNT #1 (of 2)

 Matthew K. Manning (w) • Chad Thomas (a) • Andy Suriano (c)

A new age of Turtle-mania begins! This new comic spins out of the highly anticipated Rise of the TMNT animated series! The Turtles are hitting the sewers with brand new weapons, brand new enemies, and a brand-new vision!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Preview: Rise of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #0

Rise of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #0

Matthew K. Manning (w) • Chad Thomas (a & c)

A new age of mutant madness begins with the Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! This special zero issue is your very first look at the new adventures the guys in green will be getting into this fall! Will the TMNT be able to master their new weapons, or will the weapons master them?!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Why Does Rise of The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Dip Into Racist Asian Stereotypes?

Nickelodeon‘s new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series Rise of The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles has come under criticism for numerous reasons; changes to the dynamic of the Turtles, the stylized look of the series, and drastic difference in the Turtles’ depictions. I have no opinion, no really care about all of that. Beyond all of that, the thing that stood out to me about the brand new trailer is the use of the Fu Manchu/Yellow Peril stereotype in the character of Splinter.

In the first official teaser released Friday, we get a look at what we can expect from the series and a better idea of the characters. We also get a look at Splinter who with his “slanted/slit” eyes, buck teeth, and delivery of lines, is hard to not see a racist Asian stereotype. There’s even a top knot!

This ethnic stereotype (which has no place in a kids show let alone modern society) has its roots in “Yellow Peril,” Western imperialism, racism, and led to exclusionary laws enacted against immigrants here in the United States. In entertainment it’s common and popularized in characters such as Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan both of which tread in stereotypical looks that persist to today. One scratches their head why the creators of this show thought it’s appropriate in 2018.

While there’s movements and individuals fighting for better representation of Asians in entertainment, to see a kids’ animated show perpetuate this hurtful imagery for a new generation is not only misguided it’s downright regressive and has no place on television let alone Nickelodeon which has had a history of excellent children’s programming.

You can watch the video below and see the problematic speech patterns at the 44 second mark and 53 second mark.