Tag Archives: rachael cohen

Nuclear Family banner ad

Overwatch’s Tracer’s Comic Series is Collected in Hardcover

Overwatch: Tracer—London Calling is being collected in its entirety in a 112-page hardcover from Dark Horse Comics with a brand-new cover by series cover artist, Bengal. From acclaimed Eisner and Harvey award-winning writer Mariko Tamaki and kinetic artist Babs Tarr, joined by exquisite colorist Rachael Cohen and letterer extraordinaire Deron Bennett, Blizzard Entertainment and Dark Horse Comics present Overwatch fans with an exciting new addition to Overwatch’s unique universe!

Overwatch may be disbanded, but Tracer’s time in “retirement” is up . . . After a punk-rock omnic named Iggy shows Tracer the dire living conditions forced upon London’s omnics, Tracer vows to help. But things might not be so easy, especially with larger forces sowing conflict between humans and omnics in London.

Overwatch: Tracer—London Calling hardcover will be in comic shops on September 15, 2021 and in book stores on September 28, 2021. It will retail for $24.99.

Overwatch: Tracer—London Calling

ComiXology Features 5 New Comics Including Batman and Overwatch!

ComiXology kicks things off with five new digital comic releases on their platform from DC, Magnetic Press, Dark Horse, and Harlequin. Check out all of the issues here or the individual issues below!

The Ballad of Yaya #9: Sonata

Written by Charlotte Girard, Patrick Marty, Jean-Marie Omont
Art by Golo Zhao
Purchase

Yaya is finally back home but finds the big house where she expected to find her family to be deserted. Only the loyal driver Chang is there to greet her. Fortunately, Tuduo and his little brother arrive to cheer her up and give her hope, because her parents may not be that far away…

The Ballad of Yaya #9: Sonata

Batman: Gotham Nights #22

Written by Mark Russell
Pencils Scott Koblish
Inks Scott Koblish
Colored by Nick Filardi
Purchase

The Toyman is creating the MUST-HAVE toy this Christmas, and everyone’s gotta have a piece of it…but when the toys become violent with the innocent press of a button, Batman must find a way to be in every home in Gotham, before it’s too late!

Batman: Gotham Nights #22

Overwatch: Tracer–London Calling #3

Written by Mariko Tamaki
Pencils Babs Tarr
Inks Babs Tarr
Colored by Rachael Cohen
Cover by Bengal
Purchase

Tracer struggles with guilt after the assassination of Mondatta. Meanwhile, Kace—the major omnic advocate for anti-human-omnic cohabitation—provokes a rebellion against humans in response to the death of their omnic leader.

Acclaimed Eisner and Harvey award-winning writer Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer, X-23) and kinetic artist Babs Tarr (Batgirl, Motor Crush) are joined by exquisite colorist Rachel Cohen (Snotgirl) and letterer extraordinaire Deron Bennett (Tale of Sand). Working in close collaboration, Blizzard Entertainment and Dark Horse Comics present fans and players with an exciting new addition to Overwatch’s expanding story!

Overwatch: Tracer--London Calling #3

Pregnant At Acosta’s Demand

Written by Maya Blake
Art by Eri Kawamura
Purchase

Suki has always been in love with her best friend’s brother, gorgeous and kindhearted Ramon. After they spend the night of her twenty-fifth birthday together, her heart is shattered when he immediately gets back together with his stunning girlfriend. For the next year, she keeps her distance from Ramon, until a tragic accident brings them back together. Suki has never told him about the baby they almost had, but Ramon has shocking news of his own… He wants Suki to have his child!

Pregnant At Acosta's Demand

The Tycoon’s Proposal

Written by Leigh Michaels
Art by Amie Hayasaka
Purchase

Lissa is working the cloakroom at a party when she bumps into Kurt Callahan, someone she never thought she’d see again. He’s still as charming as ever, and now he’s become a very successful businessman. He asks Lissa for her phone number, seemingly forgetting they’ve met before. Lissa, however, hasn’t forgotten about Kurt sleeping with her just to win a bet. This time, it’s his turn to get a taste of humiliation!

The Tycoon's Proposal

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: The Goon #1

The Goon #1

The next era in the legacy of The Goon starts here! This all new series marks The Goon’s return to Albatross Funnybooks and is just in time to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the book. Eric Powell takes the series to its humor-based roots as Goon & Franky return from strange adventures abroad to find a horde of unsavory characters have filled the void left in his absence from Lonely Street.

I won’t pretend to be an expert on the Goon, because I have never read a comic with the character in it before. So with that being said, the question for today’s review is whether this first issue is an easy place for new readers to start with the character (and whether it’s actually any good).

I won’t make you wait for an answer to that, because the comic didn’t leave me feeling utterly lost, which in turn meant I quite enjoyed the supernatural aspect of the story (which came as a bit of a surprise to me, I’ve gotta say).

Written and drawn by Eric Powell, who also contributed to the colouring of the book along with Rachael Cohen, The Goon #1 tells a very atmospheric story in a world that feels as though there’s a rich history – but that never relies on new readers knowing that history. Previous events are referred to in passing which helps in fleshing out the characters relationships, but also serves as a way to recap or give readers an idea to what the Goon has been up to – and for how long he’s been away.

The story is almost a standalone comic, with an almost complete tale being told in the first issue that has a strangely satisfying conclusion as the Goon reestablishes himself in the Town With No Name. It’s darkly funny at times, eliciting genuine chuckles from your humble reviewer at the visual and verbal comedy. But it’s the deeply atmospheric art where the comic shines; or rather doesn’t shine, but excels. Powell and Cohen have produced a comic that feels at once like a visual representation of the depression era (although I don’t know when the tale is set, based on the costumes and colouring I felt it was very likely a depression-era story), with the odd splash of colour temporarily brightening the page, or used to highlight certain things.

I don’t know what I expected when coming into The Goon #1 but it certainly wasn’t this – I loved the supernatural tinged depression era story that never once left me feeling as though I was jumping into a story 20 years in the making with no idea of who the Goon is (although I totally am). The Goon #1 is the kind of comic you can read without any preconceived notions, nor any need to worry about understanding the rules of the universe – it’s fun, entertaining, and offers the reader a great example of good comics.

Writer: Eric Powell Art: Eric Powell
Colours: Rachael Cohen and Eric Powell
Story: 8.1 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Albatross Funnybooks provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Snotgirl #7

After a six-month break, Snot Girl & Co are back in action. Snot Girl #7 is the second book in arc two, which ended with Charlene (Sunny’s new girlfriend), “falling” off the top of a building on New Year’s Eve. Issue #6 gave us some clues as to the general shape of this arc: lots of back story, and an ever-expanding cast of characters.

In issue #7, Caroline “Coolgirl” joins the crew in what Lottie calls “friendtegration”. At the same time, Charlene wakes up from her coma and the “fashion police” continue their off-the-books investigation. All three storylines give us more Virgil, whose status is more slippery than yards of fake silk. By the end of the issue, the girls are well on their way to San Diego for a mid-con blogger party. Charlene may or may not have revisited the scene of her fall as well as Caroline’s strange origins (see issues 1-4). Either way, her plastic surgery does NOT go as planned, and yes, that was most definitely Virgil performing “physical therapy”.

While creators Leslie Hung (artist) and Bryan Lee O’Malley (writer) call this a new arc, it’s certainly worth reading the first five issues before diving in. Arc One built a solid foundation of character connections. It may not be heavy on plot, but the inner-workings of Hung and O’Malley’s cast is almost impossible to explain in summary.

Snot Girl is a fascinating exercise. It took me a while to jump on the train, but now I don’t know what life would be like with Haters Brunch. I think that has a lot to do with Hung and O’Malley’s character-heavy story. I come away from every issue feeling like I’ve gotten a behind the scenes peek at the internet elite, which is, frankly, all I’ve ever wanted in life. Reading Snot Girl is like reading trashy paparazzi magazines, without the guilt of invading a real person’s privacy.

Hung’s artwork, too, is masterful. I would flip through lookbooks by her for hours, if they existed. (hint. Do the thing.) There is something delightful about the “classic” manga style applied to an undeniably American setting. The application may or may not lend itself to a comment on our fetishization of all things Japanese, especially considering the consumerist themes of the book itself. Thanks to Hung, our fashion-conscious cast never wears the same thing twice. It’s easy to believe that these girls have overstuffed closets in their tiny apartments, and that each item they put on has been carefully curated before they even consider walking out the door.

If I knew these people in real life, I would hate them, and you probably would, too. However, kept at the safe distance of “being fictional”, and dressed in what can only be described as the weirdest (and yet coolest?) couture I’ve ever seen, I can’t wait to find out what kind of trouble they get themselves into next.

Story: Brian Lee O’Malley Art: Leslie Hung Color: Rachael Cohen
Lettering: Maré Odomo Cover Color: Jason Fischer
Story: 8.5 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy!

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Fish Kill side ad