Tag Archives: pat brosseau

We Live

The Skybound Presents Afterschool #3 creative revealed!

Skybound has announced the all-star creative team and story behind Skybound Presents Afterschool #3the latest issue of the new teen horror anthology miniseries that goes the extra mile to teach the cautionary tales your parents were too scared to talk about. Afterschool #3 will arrive in comic book shops August 17, 2022.

In this issue, writer Jill Blotevogel teams up with artist Marley Zarcone to present a standalone horror story about a different kind of sibling bonding. Afterschool #3 will be colored by Giovanna Niro and lettered by Pat Brosseau, and features a stunning cover by Veronica Fish. 

An annoying younger sister doesn’t begin to explain Leda’s situation. Living with Izzy means perpetual chaos—meltdowns, pranks, and zero privacy. But when a killer breaks into their home, Izzy might just be their best defense. 

Skybound Presents Afterschool #3 will be available at comic book shops and digital platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, comiXology, and Google Play on Wednesday, August 17, 2022. 

Skybound Presents Afterschool #3

Get a Look at Kyle Starks and Artyom Topilin’s I Hate this Place from Image and Skybound

Image Comics and Skybound unveiled a first look at I Hate This Place #1, the hotly anticipated new supernatural horror series from the superstar team of Kyle Starks, artist Artyom Topilin, colorist Lee Loughridge, and letterer Pat Brosseau.

After inheriting a farmhouse, Trudy and Gabby are ready to start the next chapter of their lives together…except it’s already home to a mysterious force that’s attracted ghosts, aliens, and all kinds of supernatural beings for decades. Now, Gabby and Trudy must play by the “house rules” in order to survive the most frightening place on Earth.

In order to provide retailers and fans with options, each issue of I Hate This Place will have open-to-order covers by Topilin with clean and explicit cover options, featuring the new series title and the explicit version of the series’ original title, F*ck This Place.

The available covers for the debut issue include:

  • I Hate This Place #1 CVR A (Diamond Code MAR220046)
  • Fuck This Place #1 CVR B Explicit Variant (Diamond Code JAN228364) 

Image and Skybound’s I Hate This Place Gets a Trailer

Image Comics and Skybound have released a brand-new trailer for I Hate This Place, the buzzed-about new supernatural horror series from the superstar team of Kyle Starks, artist Artyom Topilin, colorist Lee Loughridge (Deadly Class, The Good Asian), and letterer Pat Brosseau.

After inheriting a farmhouse, Trudy and Gabby are ready to start the next chapter of their lives together…except it’s already home to a mysterious force that’s attracted ghosts, aliens, and all kinds of supernatural beings for decades. Now, Gabby and Trudy must play by the “house rules” in order to survive the most frightening place on Earth.

The new trailer shows a sneak preview of the series protagonists Trudy and Gabby as they inherit the family farmhouse that unfortunately, is already home to some other mysterious forces. They expected a fresh start—not to move into the most frightening place on Earth. Join Trudy and Gabby in the electric new series that will have you saying, “I hate these demons. I hate these aliens. I hate these monsters. I hate these warnings… I HATE THIS PLACE.” 

In order to provide retailers and fans with options, each issue of I Hate This Place will have open-to-order covers by Topilin with clean and explicit cover options, featuring the new series title and the explicit version of the series’ original title, F*ck This Place.

The available covers for the debut issue include: 

  • I Hate This Place #1 CVR A (Diamond Code MAR220046) 
  • Fuck This Place #1 CVR B Explicit Variant (Diamond Code JAN228364) 

Both versions of I Hate This Place #1 will be available at  comic book shops  on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, with the standard edition available on digital platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, comiXology, and Google Play.

Review: Batman: The Knight #3

Batman: The Knight #3

A young Bruce Wayne embraces the darkness and tracks down a wealthy serial killer with the help of cat burglar Lucie and the mysterious Henri Ducard, who has also been hired by Alfred Pennyworth to find Bruce. Chip Zdarsky, Carmine Di Giandomenico, and atmospheric colorist Ivan Plascencia continue to lay the foundation for Wayne’s transformation in Batman along with the growth in his detective and criminal profiling skills as he kind of, sort of tracks down his first criminal. Glonet, the serial killer, is yet another twisted mirror of Bruce Wayne and takes out the loss of parents on the people of Paris in a violent, yet methodical way, but Zdarsky’s strongest writing comes in the characterization of Lucie and Ducard, who are two very different mentors for Bruce.

From its first page, Batman: The Knight #3 features layers of storytelling voices from Chip Zdarsky’s narrative boxes for Glonet and Bruce to his more straightforward police procedural dialogue and finally the visuals of Di Giandomenico and Plascencia. Like many of Batman’s future rogues, Glonet looks sick and twisted, and later, Ivan Plascencia goes operatic with swatches of black when he gets desperate after the police and media catch onto his serial killer pattern. A guy who removes people’s finger nails after slashing them to death has serious issues, and this is Bruce’s first taste of the kind of utterly depraved villain he’ll have to face when he becomes Batman. The 12 issue length of Batman: The Knight gives Zdarsky and Carmine Di Giandomenico room to breathe, develop Bruce’s arc, and not pull a Jeph Loeb and introduce the big, twist-y bad guy towards the beginning of the series. (His anti-Asian racism aside, Long Halloween and Hush are pretty great especially on the art side.)

No story of Bruce Wayne’s training to become a creature of the night is complete without checking in with Henri Ducard. Wisely, Chip Zdarsky doesn’t put all his cards on the table in regards to the character, but shows his cunning and that he always gets his many as he easily finds Bruce for Alfred. However, he and Di Giandomenico aren’t afraid to show Ducard’s vulnerable side with a big image of him getting shot in the gut by Lucie’s fence for the jewelry box in Glonet’s safe. Carmine Di Giandomenico takes a moment to show the pure terror on Bruce’s face when he thinks that he is responsible for yet another person’s death. The sequence also shows Bruce’s awkwardness and lack of savvy around criminals and shady folks with his gaze lingering on the man that Lucie is about to sell the jewelry box to. He’s all rage and raw ideology with some acrobatics and fighting skills and is light years away from Matches Malone.

I was initially skeptical of yet another comic set in Batman’s past, but Batman: The Knight #3 continues to plead its case through its focus on character development and Bruce’s relationship with his mentors. Alfred Pennyworth doesn’t appear in the book that much, but every panel he appears in is charged with emotion with Zdarsky going silent and letting Carmine Di Giandomenico just having him react to the fact that Bruce is alive and that maybe his dangerous trip is a passing phase. We know it’s not, but it’s nice to see a character that has been missing from the present day Batman comics for a couple years and showing someone who 100% has Bruce’s back unlike Lucie and Ducard, who deep down just care about money although Lucie has more of nurturing relationship with Bruce as evidenced by her cheek kiss and calling him “little knight”.

Batman: The Knight #3 comes across as a rough draft version of one of Batman’s great mysteries and villain fights, but Chip Zdarsky, Di Giandomenico, and Ivan Plascencia masterfully show Bruce’s flaws while hinting at the darkness and obsession that would make him a legendary crime fighter.

Story: Chip Zdarsky Art: Carmine Di Giandomenico
Colors: Ivan Plascencia Letters: Pat Brosseau

Story: 8.3 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Batman: The Knight #1

Batman: The Knight #1

For quite some time, comic readers only knew Chip Zdarsky for his comedic series. With Marvel’s Daredevil, Zdarsky planted a new flag showing off he could do “serious” and more brooding comics. The result is a run that has been praised by critic and fans alike. Now, he’s taken his talents to DC Comics and sees if he can repeat the quality with Batman: The Knight #1, the start of a new series taking a look at Bruce Wayne’s early years.

The early years of Bruce Wayne training to become Batman have been danced around in various ways over the years. Generally though, we get a story about a young man angry and reeling from tragedy lashing out on a journey of training and discovery. The details and specifics change but the general idea remains the same. Batman: The Knight #1 is a new take on the story. It bridges that gap between the angry and the journey around the world to train.

Batman: The Knight #1 is an interesting start to the story. It’s slow and a bit of a headscratcher. We get the foundations of what Bruce Wayne will become but very rough and at times unlikeable. He stands up for justice. He also is very brash and headstrong. At times he comes off as a bully. It’s not until the very end of the comic that we get a better sense of the Bruce Wayne we know.

Zdarsky gives us a slow start in Batman: The Knight #1 and honestly a character that at times is not enjoyable at all. You want to pull him aside and slap him around making Alfred’s handling of things even more saintly than that character already is. But, maybe that’s part of the point and the plan? Zdarsky is delivering a story that we get to see Bruce’s journey to become the world’s greatest detective and it has to start somewhere. The growth is the point of the journey.

The art by Carmine Di Giandomenico is solid. With color by Ivan Plascencia and lettering by Pat Brosseau the characters look great but there’s a timeless aspect to it all that’s interesting. This story could be the present. It could be the past. It’s all kind of up in the air allowing the reader to focus on the interactions between the characters which is key. This is very much focused on Bruce attempting to figure things out and those he entrusts near him. The action is limited and instead we get a solid sense of mood and feelings through the art and its subtle body language.

Batman: The Knight #1 isn’t a bad start but it also doesn’t excite. It’s an interesting comic that doesn’t quite yet make the case as to why it exists and also doesn’t quite make a whole lot of sense character wise leaving out what has lead up to the current state. Zdarsky has show he can play the long game and pays off after a while, we just might need to wait a little bit more until we get to that moment.s

Story: Chip Zdarsky Art: Carmine Di Giandomenico
Color: Ivan Plascencia Letterer: Pat Brosseau
Story: 7.75 Art: 8.15 Overall: 7.8 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Tim Drake returns in Batman: Urban Legends #10. Get a First Look

After an issue #6 appearance that left comic book fans slack-jawed, Robin returns to Gotham City just in time for the Holidays when Batman: Urban Legends #10 arrives in comic book stores and on participating digital platforms on Tuesday, December 14.

Written by Meghan Fitzmartin, the feature-length story “A Carol of Bats” features art by Alberto Albuquerque Jimenez (pencils/inks), Nick Filardi (colors), and Pat Brosseau (Letters). This continues Tim’s journey of self-discovery from Urban Legends #6, and sees Tim balancing his drive to fight crime with his desire to be a great partner. Amidst the ashes of a devastated Gotham City and Fear State, Tim Drake comes back to Gotham City to help Batman and Nightwing try and put the city back together again after its devastation at the hands of The Scarecrow and The Magistrate. Along the way, Tim tries to get Batman out of a Scrooge-level funk, where the Dark Knight has serious doubts about if he’s failed Gotham City, and if its citizens will stop being scared and angry enough to have hope for the future. 

Featuring a main cover by Belen Ortega, who’d previously drawn the Tim Drake story “The Sum of Our Parts.” and a powerful Azrael variant by Riccardo Federici, Batman: Urban Legends #10 also includes another feature-length (22 pages) Nightwing tale, by writer Tini Howard, marking her first DC story since 2016. Howard will take over as writer of Catwoman beginning with issue #39 in January. Featuring art by Christian Duce and colors by Sarah Stern, this follow-up to the events of Fear State follows Nightwing around the holiday season, avoiding attending the Bat-Family holiday party before he’s doused with Fear Toxin and forced to relive memories of his past, present, and future shown to him by three ghostly versions of Batgirl – Barbara Gordon, Stephanie Brown, and Cassandra Cain. 

Writer Dan Watters and artist Nikola Cizmesija conclude the three-part Azrael tale, “Dark Knight of the Soul,” with colors by Ivan Plascencia. In his return to Gotham City, Jean-Paul Valley faces off for a final time with the new villain Poor Fellow, who has a lot more to tell Jean-Paul about the legacy of Azrael than he ever knew. Batman: Urban Legends #10 also features a stunning Azrael variant cover by artist Riccardo Federici

Rounding out this issue is the heartbreaking close of the two-part story featuring the terrorizing twins Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, written by Punchline co-writer Sam Johns and Injustice: Unkillables artist Karl Mostert

Batman: Urban Legends #10 arrives in comic book shops and participating digital platforms on Tuesday, December 14, 2021.

Review: Skybound X #2

Celebrating 10 years of Skybound, this anthology celebrates the past, present, and future. And… will definitely become collectibles due to the debuts.

Story: Robert Kirkman, Joshua Williamson, Tri Vuong, Irma Kniivila, Chip Zdarsky
Art: Ryan Ottley, Andrei Bressan, Tri Vuong, Ramón K. Perez
Ink: Cliff Rathburn
Color: Dave McCaig, Adriano Lucas, Irma Kniivila, Mike Spicer
Letterer: Rus Wooton, Pat Brosseau, Aditya Bidikar

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Amazon
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Skybound X #1

Celebrating 10 years of Skybound, Skybound X celebrates the past, present, and future. And… will definitely become collectibles due to the debuts.

Story: Robert Kirkman, James Harren, Chris Dingess, Tillie Walden
Art: Ryan Ottley, James Harren, Matthew Roberts, Tillie Walden
Ink/Tones: Cliff Rathburn
Color: Dave McCaig, Dave Stewart
Letterer: Rus Wooton, Pat Brosseau, Tillie Walden

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Amazon
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

TV Review: Sweet Tooth S1E2 Sorry About All the Dead People

Sweet Tooth Sorry About All the Dead People

The second episode of Sweet Tooth, “Sorry About All the Dead People“, focuses on Aimee, played by Dania Ramirez. It’s an interesting opening as it not only introduces a new character but gives us the world from another perspective. Much like the first episode, there’s a sadness and something magical about it all.

Aimee’s story, begins here.

Gus and Tommy’s adventure begins hitting some bumps and forcing them to find help introducing three new individuals who have been hiding out from the pandemic.

Yes, pandemic.

There’s something unerving and weird watching Sweet Tooth as we continue to experience one ourselves. Characters wear masks much like so many of us have done over the year. It’s a weird experience and in some ways Sweet Tooth feels like the first major film and show to feel like a response to our current life. Sweet Tooth was actually written in 2009.

The episode’s an interesting one as we see Gus interact with a kid his own age. It’s an interaction that feels like something so many of us will be experiencing over the next year as we reintegrate into society. The entire segment is one of fun and joy, a glimpse of hope in a world devestated.

The episode also adds a lot to the world and series. We get hints as to the villains that’ll be faced. And we get some depth to the characters as well. It’s just a fantastic follow-up full of action and emotion. “Sorry About All the Dead People” is a damn near-perfect second episode. It continues the emotional journey and adventure while expanding the world and danger.

Overall Rating: 10

TV Review: Sweet Tooth S1E1 Out of the Deep Woods

Sweet Tooth Out of the Deep Woods

Adapting the beloved and praised comic series from Jeff Lemire (along with letterer Pat Brosseau and colorist Jose Villarrubia), Sweet Tooth‘s debut, “Out of the Deep Woods“, takes us to a magical world and the beginning of a magical journey.

The world has been devestated by an unknown illness. In the destruction, a new race is being born, one that’s half human and half animal. These hybrids face hatred and racism from the survivors who blame them for what has happened.

Sweet Tooth tells the story of Gus, a half human and half deer. Gus is hidden away by his father, played by Will Forte, in an attempt to protect him from the chaos. After his father dies, Gus is forced to step into an unknown and dangerous world.

Played by Christian Convery in a star-making role, Gus has the bright-eyed wonder that makes interacting with kids so enjoyable. Convery delivers a performance that’ll have viewers going through a series of emotions in the debut. There’s a sweet innocence that feels natural and honest. It’s a believable delivery that’ll have you wanting to protect Gus from the dangers he faces.

The series knows at its core is heart. The interaction between Will Forte (as Gus’ father) and Convery is sweet. Forte’s delivery of a paranoid father attempting to protect his son shows a depth not often seen in his comedic offerings. It’s a father and son interaction that is both protective and somewhat scary as Gus’ father spirals in his fear.

Convery stands out but maybe more so is Nonso Anozie as Tommy Jepperd, his unexpected protector. Anozie delivers a tough but vulnerable character. He’s torn about his own survival and is the tough guy with the heart of gold. He could easily hurt Gus, aka Sweet Tooth, and help himself, but he has limits as he states. It’s a performance that will have viewers feeling for Jepperd’s clear sadness and wanting him as their protector and guide.

Sweet Tooth‘s debut is one that’ll have you returning to your childhood roots. “Out of the Deep Woods” feels like the heir to Jim Henson’s films and shows of the 1980s. There’s an adult nature to a story that so far is accessable for younger viewers. It’s a story of exploration and finding more about oneself. It’s a hell of a start and maybe one of the best comic adaptations ever.

Gus’ story, begins here.

Overall Rating: 10

Zeismic
« Older Entries