Tag Archives: Mike Stock

The Pride Joins ComiXology Originals With The All-New Series The Pride Season Two

The Pride Season Two #1

comiXology and Queer Comix announced that The Pride Season Two – an all-new, six issue comic book series spinning out of writer Joe Glass’ acclaimed LGBTQ+ super hero series The Pride. The new volume will debut as part of comiXology Originals on June 5th, just in time for Pride month. Additionally, the acclaimed indie hits, The Pride Season One and The Pride Adventures Season One, also join comiXology Originals. The Pride is the first Submit series comiXology has invested in to continue through comiXology Originals, making these amazing stories available to a new worldwide audience.

The Pride Season Two #1, written by Joe Glass and illustrated by Cem Iroz with colors by Mark Dale and letters by Mike Stock, as well as The Pride Season One and The Pride Adventures Season One will be digitally available to read for members of Prime Reading, Kindle Unlimited, and comiXology Unlimited, and available for purchase on Kindle and comiXology upon release, June 5th. All of The Pride will be available in print via Amazon.com at the same time as The Pride Season Two collected edition release.

The Pride Season One

In The Pride Season Two you’ll join an amazing cast of heroes who united to form a team comprised entirely of LGBTQ+ crime fighters in bright and fun action-packed adventures that any super hero fan can enjoy. The team returns with exciting newadventures where they must stop a nuclear meltdown, welcome new heroes, and investigate a spate of mysterious attacks on the world’s biggest pop star.

In a world populated by people with superpowers, FabMan (Tomorrow’s Fabulous Man, Today) feels a deep schism in the representation of his community and his own heroic exploits, which are often presented as fluff pieces in the news. Wanting to fight for change, he forms The Pride, the world’s premier LGBTQ+ supergroup – featuring a diverse range of characters representative of the broad LGBTQ+ spectrum, from gay, lesbian, bi and trans superheroes to non-binary, drag queen, HIV+, children of gay parents, and more. Together they fight to protect the world from prejudice, misrepresentation, and injustice, not to mention a pesky supervillain or two!

Review: A Knight in Kansas City #2

A Knight in Kansas City #2

When we think of a cult, we’re used to situations mostly revolving around ones that sprouted up around an ideal, a person, or a religion. Many of them are harmless and a good number of them have become a circus, both good and bad, in some ways.

After watching Surviving R.Kelly over the past few nights, it has given me a different view of what a cult is. The show itself, started off as an examination of the many rumors about Kelly’s sexual proclivities and his “harem”. What became apparent throughout the series is that it was more than rumors,and what happened in his inner circle,was both disgusting and should be considered “sex slavery”. The rules, conditions, and power dynamics that were imposed on these women shined a light on the devaluation of black women that were not seen in the public eye as it should have been.  The reality is who knows what disgusting details could have been left.

In the second issue of A Knight In Kansas City, Kay’s investigation into a cult gets deeper and fatal for some.

As Kay searches for answers, she stumbles upon a boy whose mother was deep into the cult and may lead her to the answers she is looking for. What she finds in her search is a mysterious videotape, which exposes the dirty secrets the Knights have been hiding and what it could mean to the city. Kay gets motivated by the venom of the propaganda to confront Brother Willem and the rest of hierarchy at the Knights headquarters.

Overall, it’s an engaging second issue that gives the story a bit of a jolt that keeps reader interested. The story by
Daniel Gargallo and Sam Kramer is full of pulp, action packed and scintillating. The art by Luana Vecchio and Mike Stock is intense and elegant. Altogether, it’s a fine sophomore episode of this story, one that adds even more mystery to this pot boiler.

Story: Daniel Gargallo and Sam Kramer
Art: Luana Vecchio and Mike Stock
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: The Pride Vol. 1

Growing up as a cinephile, I loved watching 70s movies especially those starring a young femme fatale named Pam Grier. The way she commanded he screen had just about every man in my family grinning from ear to ear. As years went by I saw an older yet still very much attractive actor in movies when she played a supporting character but that smile still got every man that was in her presence. So, it was pretty much kismet, when I found out she was going to be in a TV show on Showtime, The L Word.

I went into the show because of Grier but came out of the show, a massive fan, of the characters, the stories, and the culture, as it opened my eyes to a world I never knew existed. As the show explored the many intricacies surrounding sexual identity and the discrimination that women and any person who identifies as LGBTQ face daily. This opened my eyes to just how marginalized they were, or rarely they see themselves reflected in the arts without the utilization of stereotypes, especially comics. It was only within the past few years, comics have started to delve into telling these narratives with standouts being the superior Sunstone and the gone too soon Midnighter. Another standout that I came across was Joe Glass’ The Pride, which revolve around a team of superheroes who just so happens to be LGBTQ.

In the opening pages we meet a well-meaning superhero, Fab-Man, who is openly gay and who is not taken as seriously as his cisgender counterparts. This leads him to create his own, his “Justice League” full of LGBTQ superheroes who fight injustice as well as they face villains who are homophobic and evil and struggle to find a synergy to work with each other. One of the standout stories is “You Think You’re a Man,” one of our heroes finds out he has a son and a one of the villains has kidnapped him, leading our heroes to a trap which looks to silences one member forever. In “It Gets Better,” Fab Man talks a young boy who wants to commit suicide after being harassed because he was gay. In the last standout story, we get the origin of “Muscle Mary,” a warrior who can do battle with anyone but who originally came to the world of men, to avenge a death, but eventually came to defend mortals.

Overall, The Pride is a comic which shows that heroes are never black and white and usually contain multitudes of layers. Some times those layers is what makes you extraordinary. The stories by the different writers is well developed, smart, and exciting. Th art by the different artists complement the stories well. Altogether, a strong book.

Story: Joe Glass, PJ Montgomery, Mike Garley
Art: Kris Anka, Kris Carter, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barros, Nathan Ashworth, Ben Wilsonham, Mike Stock, Ricardo Bessa, Gavin Mitchell, Maxime Garbarini, Dan Harris, Ryan Cody, Christian Wildgoose and Cory Smith
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy