Tag Archives: mark millar

Night Club #1 rises again with a new printing

Inventory of the new hit Night Club #1 by writer Mark Millar and artist Juanan Ramírez has been drained dry at the distributor level and will be rushed back to print in order to keep up with rapid reorders.

Night Club is part of Millar’s growing bloodline of popular comics owned by Netflix and each issue of the series boasts an incredibly low price point of only $1.99.

In Night Club, a group of unsuspecting 17-year-olds is bitten by a vampire and suddenly imbued with super-heroic powers. The story unfolds as it asks: Now what? Do you live in the shadows and drink human blood? Or do you use your newfound abilities to become the costumed vigilante you’ve always dreamed of instead? You’re bulletproof, you can crawl up walls, and you can turn to mist, bats, or even a wolf. Why not have a little fun?

Night Club #1 second printing (Diamond Code NOV228348) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, February 8. Night Club #2 Cover A (Diamond Code NOV220257) and Night Club #2 Cover B (Diamond Code NOV220258) will be available on Wednesday, January 18.

Night Club #1 second printing

Nemesis Reloaded #1 delivers a bloody fantastic reboot

Nemesis Reloaded #1

Nemesis Reloaded #1 opens not with a splash but a letter, an introduction from writer Mark Millar. Millar goes into his ideas and somewhat of where this series is going. The original Nemesis series was created by Millar and Steve McNiven debuting 13 years ago. I myself only remember the basics, an evil version of Batman, but do remember it being entertaining. Flash forward to today and much has changed. With Millar looking at the big picture of all his properties, it was time to bring back this villain all leading up to July’s event “Big Game” where every Millar character will cross over in a big summer event.

As Millar notes, much has changed since that original series debuted. The world has shifted in so many ways. It’s politics, it’s economics, the environment and health of its people. Millar has recognized that and uses all of the current unease to launch Nemesis Reloaded #1. Much like the original, the story focuses on a Batman like character who’s a villain. Who he is? What does he want? We don’t really know and it doesn’t really matter.

Millar provides a self-aware comic that both takes itself seriously and skewers itself too. A discussion at the beginning about Tarantino feels like it’s talking as much about the comic to come as it does the director and writer. Like Tarantino, Nemesis Reloaded #1 bathes in its absurdity and orgy of violence and blood. It’s over the top in all the right ways updated for today’s political and social climate.

Much of that is due to the art of Jorge Jiménez. With color by Giovanna Niro and lettering by Clem Robins, the visuals for the comic are so over the top it’s just fun. Limbs are cut off, bullets fly, death reigns. It’s all done in a way it’s hard to take seriously, instead you’re forced to site back and enjoy the dance of destruction. Everything clicks visually creating an action comic with visual comedic chops. Those moments are brought home by the visuals which nail the punchlines over and over.

Nemesis Reloaded #1 is the insane violence Mark Millar has delivered in the past. Everything is ramped up to 11 delivering a comic that feels like it is both taking itself seriously but also spoofing so much of what has come before. No matter, it’s a hell of a lot of fun and a welcome return after being missing for so long.

Story: Mark Millar Art: Jorge Jiménez
Color: Giovanna Niro Letterer: Clem Robins
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.75 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: Zeus ComicscomiXology/Kindle

The “Big Game” summer event launches in March with The Ambassadors

Bestselling dream team Mark Millar and Frank Quitely launch the first issue of The Ambassadors in March with a checklist of white-hot artists handling each of the six interconnected issues. The lineup includes: Olivier Coipel, Travis Charest, Matteo Buffagni, Karl Kerschl, and Matteo Scalera—a wish-list for any comic book fan.

This six issue Netflix miniseries will hit shelves in March from Image Comics as part of the highly anticipated “Big Game” summer event being prepped by Nemesis: Reloaded (with superstar Jorge Jiminez), Night Club with Juanan Ramirez, and the brand new volume of The Magic Order—currently being made as a huge live action show for the streamer. The Ambassadors will lead directly into the big 2023 Summer event “Big Game”, where all the Millarworld characters from Kick-Ass, Kingsman, Starlight, Jupiter’s Legacy, and more, come together in a huge adventure drawn by Marvel superstar Pepe Larraz.

The Ambassadors #1 will also feature variant covers by Larraz and Gigi Cavenago and give us a superhero comic unlike anything we’ve ever seen before.

This new series promises an enormous story about ordinary people from around the world and explores what makes a select few worthy of power.

The Ambassadors #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, March 29.

Mark Millar and Jorge Jiménez team for Nemesis: Reloaded

Mark Millar will team with Jorge Jiménez for the upcoming sequel series, Nemesis: Reloaded. This five issue miniseries will launch in January 2023 from Image Comics

Nemesis: Reloaded is a star-studded sequel series which will usher in an all-new, blood-drenched chapter for one of Millar’s most controversial—and popular—supervillain creations. 

The world’s most evil comic book is back! Who is Nemesis, and why does this eccentric billionaire who dresses up in a mask and cape want to terrorize people instead of helping them? Isn’t that how this is supposed to go? 

Nemesis: Reloaded #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, January 11:

  • Cover A by Jorge Jiménez – Diamond Code NOV220089
  • Cover B by Jorge Jiménez B&W variant – Diamond Code NOV220090
  • Cover C by Steve McNiven – Diamond Code NOV220091
  • Cover D by Frank Quitely – Diamond Code NOV220092
  • Cover E by Fiona Staples – Diamond Code NOV220093
  • Cover F blank – Diamond Code NOV220094

Mark Millar and Juanan Ramírez sink their teeth into Night Club

Mark Millar and artist Juanan Ramírez offer up a new series for readers to sink their teeth into with the launch of Night Club. This upcoming series will take flight in December from Image Comics and will join Millar’s growing line of popular comics owned by Netflix.

Each issue of the series will boast an incredibly low price point of only $1.99.

In Night Club, a group of unsuspecting 17-year-olds is bitten by a vampire and suddenly imbued with superheroic powers. The story unfolds as it asks: Now what? Do you live in the shadows and drink human blood? Or do you use your newfound abilities to become the costumed vigilante you’ve always dreamed of instead? You’re bulletproof, you can crawl up walls, and you can turn to mist, bats, or even a wolf. Why not have a little fun?

Night Club #1 will be released on Wednesday, December 14 at comic book shops as well as across many digital platforms, including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, and Google Play:

  • Cover A by Ramírez – Diamond Code OCT220052
  • Cover B by Ramírez B&W – Diamond Code OCT220053
  • Cover C by Greg Capullo – Diamond Code OCT220054

The Magic Order’s Third Story Arc Kicks off in July

Superstar writer Mark Millar launches the third volume of his smash-hit horror series with artist Gigi CavenagoThe Magic Order 3 #1. This six-issue story arc will kick off from Image Comics in July.

So far readers have met the American and British members of the Magic Order. Now it’s time to meet the Asian chapter, including a brilliant new major player in the upcoming live-action Netflix show—Sammy Liu. This issue will be a huge collector’s item.

Magic Order 3 #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, July 27:

  • Cover A by Cavenago – Diamond Code MAY220044
  • Cover B by Cavenago B&W – Diamond Code MAY220045
  • Cover C by Greg Tocchini – Diamond Code MAY220046
  • Cover D by blank sketch cover – Diamond Code MAY220047
Magic Order 3 #1

Underrated: Ultimate X-Men

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week:  Ultimate X-Men


Ultimate_X-Men_Vol_1_1.jpgUltimate X-Men was a series launched under Marvel’s Ultimate Marvel imprint that aimed to do away with 40 years of so called convoluted continuity into a more modern and updated setting. The second title to launch after Ultimate Spider-Man, Ultimate X-Men was written by Mark Millar and drawn by Adam and Andy Kubert. Millar was largely ignorant of the storied history of the X-Men, and reinvented the characters with the 2000 X-Men  film as his primary reference. Millar has admitted in an interview with Sequential Tart that he knew bugger all about the characters before Joe Queseda and Bill Jemas asked him to pitch for X-Men, expecting them to use the script as toilet paper. Instead, because Millar knew next to nothing about the franchise, they decided that he should be the one to reboot the X-Men for Marvel’s Ultimate line of comics.

Free from the shackles of the past Millar set about crafting a new, and more modern universe for the X-Men to inhabit aimed to bring a return to the mainstream appeal the franchise enjoyed years before.

Launching in 2001, Ultimate X-Men was also part of Marvel’s “dot-comics” format, which was an early translation of print to digital using a slightly animated Flash format. Comic pages would appear on the screen showing a handful of panels at a time, and speech and thought bubbles hovering over the characters. The format would eventually pave the way toward Marvel Unlimited. Although not the first comic on the dot-comics format, it was one of the first that I read that way. Because the dot-comics were free to whomever had an internet connection and the patience to read the comics in their episodic form (if memory serves, five or so pages were uploaded every few days), they were a great way for people like myself to get introduced to a series that I otherwise would not have before.

Ultimate_X-Men_Vol_1 interior.jpg

Although I had previously dabbled in the X-Universe before, I was never a constant reader. Ultimate X-Men drew me into reading an ongoing series featuring Marvel’s merry mutants for the first time. The characters were familiar and yet felt fresh, the situations they were in reflected more of the world around them than the main Marvel universe characters did. Or at least that’s how it felt at the  time. It was here, with a newly discovered love of the characters that I truly became an X-Men fan and not just a Wolverine fan. At the time the irony that the series was being written by a man who knew bugger all about the characters was something I was unaware of, but the benefit of hindsight brings into sharp focus that provided one is a competent writer and has some understanding of the subject, then the essence of characters one is writing about shine through. And Millar, for the most part, had that understanding.

Running from 2001 until 2009 where it was cancelled at the conclusion of the critical and commercial failure of the Ultimatum crossover, Ultimate X-Men enjoyed nearly a decade as the fan favourite X-title. Although it was eventually relaunched as Ultimate Comics X-Men in 2011, the series never enjoyed the success of its pre-Ultimatum days.

Would Ultimate X-Men have worked had it been released today? Although we’ll probably never know, you can look at DC’s New 52 and to a lesser extent the successor to the Ultimate line (Ultimate Comics) to get an idea – although there are obvious faults with either comparison. The New 52 replaced DC’s continuity in its entirety, to much chatter from fans, and the Ultimate Comcs line tried to pick up after the failure of Ultimatum which had driven many fans away already. However you look at it, for nearly ten years Ultimate X-Men, and some of its companions under Marvel’s Ultimate line, were among the pinnacle of superhero comics. The reimagining of the characters, stripping them down to their core and putting them in a different world was a brave choice, but one that I, and thousands like me, fell in love with.

I grew up reading Ultimate X-Men, both as a comics fan and a human, and it hurts me a little to see people ignore it as an unimportant part of Marvel’s past because it’s not chronologically relevant in the X-Men’s story. It’s not, not really, but that doesn’t mean the stories told under the Ultimate X-Men banner remain among some of my most cherished to this day. If, for whatever reason, you haven’t read them then you can find the collected editions easily enough at your favourite online retailer (or, maybe your LCS can get them in for you).

That’s all we have for this week, folks. Come back next time  when there’s something else Underrated to talk about.

 

Underrated: Starlight

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Starlight.


Conceived by Hollywood darling Mark Millar (with art by Goran Parlov), Starlight was a six issue miniseries that was released beginning in March of 2014 and ending in October 2014. Telling the story of the superbly named Duke McQueen, an Air Force pilot who went to space and saved the alien planet of Tantalus from tyranny forty years ago, before returning home and raising a family instead of staying to rule the planet. His exploits, sadly, were written off as the ravings of a attention seeker, and Duke became a joke to all but his sweetheart.

Now, with his wife dead, his family not giving him the time of day, and people still treating him as a joke, a spaceship arrives to take the old man on one last grand adventure to save the planet Tantalus once again.

One of the less Mark Millar-y comics that have come from his keyboard in the last half decade, this mini series had none of the hyper violence seen in things such as Kick-Ass, Wanted and Kingsman. Surprisingly Starlight is a sentimental yarn about a former hero redeeming himself in his own eyes and saving the planet from a tyrannical despot once again.

Starlight is a pleasure to read. Although criticism can be levelled at the sudden change as Duke McQueen goes from couch-bound crank to crack aimed space hero over the course of only a couple of issues, for me that misses the spirit of the book. Think not of Starlight in terms of the modern, more realism based stories we’ve become accustomed to, and instead fall back into the nostalgia of the classic stories of yesteryear as Millar embraces the straight forward nature of the story – almost against type, as McQueen battles against an antagonist who doesn’t measure up to the rich and deep characterization of the hero; Kingfisher is a perfectly adequate villain, but make no mistake, Starlight is a redemptive story for Duke McQueen.

Perhaps in seeing McQueen struggle against overwhelming odds, himself, and the reputation he had been given, we can find hope and inspiration in our own lives. Not quite the lesson I expected to take from a Mark Millar book.

I had forgotten how much I loved Starlight until I saw a tweet mentioning the series a few days ago that inspired me to dig the comics out and reread them.  It’s a love that I genuinely believe you’ll share when you give the series a chance – it’s an underrated gem that you wouldn’t typically expect to come from Mark Millar.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Mark Millar and Matteo Scalera’s King of Spies #1 Launches in December

Mark Millar has created a new series at Netflix in his Millarworld department, but he’s also adapting this into a comic book series too. Re-teaming with fan favorite artist Matteo Scalera, the first appearance of this new character will now appear in King of Spies #1, a spectacular four issue miniseries launching from Image Comics in December. 

In King of Spies, the world’s greatest secret agent has six months to live. Does he die quietly in a hospital bed, or does he make up for a lifetime of bad decisions and murder all the REAL bad guys before he goes? He’s been propping up an unfair system for over forty years. Now he knows where all the bodies are buried and has nothing to lose when he turns his guns on everyone who ever made a buck creating the mess we’re all in right now.

King of Spies #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, December 1:

  • Cover A by Scalera – Diamond Code OCT210034
  • Cover B B&W by Scalera – Diamond Code OCT210035
  • Cover C by Mark Chiarello – Diamond Code OCT210036
  • Cover D by Ozgur Yildirim – Diamond Code OCT210037
  • Cover E blank cover – Diamond Code OCT210038

Get a Look at the Super Crooks Anime

Based on the comic book from Mark Millar, Netflix has revealed a first look at the anime take on Super Crooks.

In this anime adaptation, small-time crook Johnny Bolt recruits the ultimate crew for one last heist — for real! This super-powered heist story about eight super-villains is jam-packed with action and told in 13x 30-minute episodes lushly produced by Bones.

Super Crooks premieres on November 25th, only on Netflix.

« Older Entries