Tag Archives: marissa louise

Mad Cave Studios announces Monomyth by David Hazan, Cecilia Lo Valvo, Marissa Louise, and Lucas Gattoni

Mad Cave Studios has announced Monomyth, the upcoming fantasy/horror series by writer David Hazan, with art by Cecilia Lo Valvo, colors by Marissa Louise, and letters by Lucas GattoniMonomyth is a story about the darkest side of stories…how they use people, twist people and affect people and the dangers of getting stuck telling the same tired tales.

Magic is all but extinct. When the last ailing wizard casts a final desperate spell to summon the descendants of ancient bloodlines to a school for magic now in disrepair…those chosen ones find a horror of the likes they’ve never experienced. They will have to confront the deepest parts of themselves, their tragic pasts, and defeat each other in order to survive the ordeal.

Monomyth #1 hits shelves this May. Cover A by artist Marvel and DC Artist Juan Doe, cover B by Shane Connery Volk!

Review: Albatross Exploding Funnybooks #1

Albatross Funnybooks launches this fun anthology featuring its amazing cast of characters and storytelling. Perfect for longtime fans and those new to Eric Powell‘s brilliance!

Story: Eric Powell, Lucky Yates
Art: Eric Powell
Color: Marissa Louise

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology/Kindle
TFAW


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Get a Sneak Peek at DC Pride 2022

DC Pride 2022’s storytellers have ambitious goals: to deliver new stories, highlight DC’s fan-favorite LGBTQIA+ characters, and show fans more pride than ever before. DC has released more details about DC Pride 2022, including an excerpt from Nicole Maines’ introduction, the addition of Kevin Conroy (the iconic voice of Batman in Batman: The Animated Series), J. Bone and Aditya Bidikar to an already packed roster of talent, a first look at some of the artwork coming in from the creative teams, and more. Local comic shops are taking preorders through May 1 and the 104-page Prestige format comic will publish in print and on digital platforms on May 31.

So, what’s inside DC Pride 2022? Will there be a Harley and Ivy story? Will there be a Tim Drake story? What other characters are getting a spotlight? The answers are “yes, yes, and wait and see!” but before DC reveals of the full list of talent contributing to DC Pride 2022, please take a moment to read a passage from Nicole Maines’ introduction. The author, actress and real-life superhero is on the front lines of activism and has an important message for readers:

“Representation is something that so many take for granted. But as queer people, we have always understood not only its necessity, but its power. Seeing yourself in the media you consume is validating in a way that says, “You are not alone.”

Seeing yourself in comic books, though, in your favorite superheroes, is especially powerful. It tells us that not only are there other people like us out there (something that this young trans girl growing up in rural Maine desperately needed), but that they stand alongside the very best of us.

They are the best of us.

Superheroes set the bar and they set it high. Because if you can be a superhero, you can be anything. And superheroes are categorized as such not due to their superhuman abilities, extraterrestrial origins, or truly fabulous fashion choices. They are superheroes because they stand up for what is right against any odds.

It is their courage that sets them apart.” —Nicole Maines, DC Pride 2022

DC Pride 2022

Check out all the incredible stories that DC Pride 2022 will include and the talent behind them, then scroll down for a few sneak-peek previews and more!

The DC Pride 2022 creative teams will include:

  • “Super Pride” by Devin Grayson, Nick Robles, Triona Farrell and Aditya Bidikar
  • “Confessions” by Stephanie Williams, Meghan Hetrick, Marissa Louise and Ariana Maher
  • “Special Delivery” by Travis Moore, Enrica Eren Angiolini and Ariana Maher
  • “Are You Ready for This?” by Danny Lore & Ivan Cohen, Brittney Williams, Enrica Eren Angiolini and Ariana Maher
  • “A World Kept Just For Me” by Alyssa Wong, W. Scott Forbes and Ariana Maher
  • “The Gumshoe in Green” by Tini Howard, Evan Cagle and Lucas Gattoni
  • “Think of Me” by Ted Brandt & Ro Stein and Frank Cvetkovic
  • “Public Display of the Electromagnetic Spectrum” by Greg Lockard, Giulio Macaione and Aditya Bidikar
  • “The Hunt” by Dani Fernandez, Zoe Thorogood, Jeremy Lawson and Aditya Bidikar
  • “Bat’s in the Cradle” by Stephanie Philips, Samantha Dodge, Marissa Louise and Lucas Gattoni
  • “Up at Bat” by Jadzia Axelrod, Lynne Yoshii, Tamra Bonvillain and Ariana Maher
  • and “Finding Batman,” a personal story by Kevin Conroy with art by J. Bone and Aditya Bidikar

With over 100 pages of original stories and content, DC Pride 2022 celebrates the strength and courage it takes to be a DC Super Hero. Here’s a sneak peek into what a few of the teams will be delivering:

“Confessions” by Stephanie Williams, Meghan Hetrick, Marissa Louise and Ariana Maher
“Public Display of the Electromagnetic Spectrum” by Greg Lockard, Giulio Macaione and Aditya Bidikar
“Special Delivery” by Travis Moore, Enrica Eren Angiolini and Ariana Maher
“Up at Bat” by Jadzia Axelrod, Lynne Yoshii, Tamra Bonvillain and Ariana Maher
“Are You Ready for This?” by Danny Lore & Ivan Cohen, Brittney Williams, Enrica Eren Angiolini and Ariana Maher
“Think of Me” by Ted Brandt & Ro Stein and Frank Cvetkovic

There’s 8 New Releases on comiXology from Scholastic Graphix, DC, and more!

There’s eight new releases available now on comiXology from Scholastic Graphix, DC, and Tidalwave Productions. You can start shopping now or check out the individual releases below.

Baby-Sitters Club Vol. 11: Good-bye Stacey, Good-bye

Written by Ann M. Martin
Art by Gabriela Epstein
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A brand-new Baby-sitters Club graphic novel adapted by Gabriela Epstein!

Baby-Sitters Club Vol. 11: Good-bye Stacey, Good-bye

Baby-Sitters Little Sister Vol. 5: Karen’s School Picture

Written by Ann M. Martin
Art by Katy Farina
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Another graphic novel in this fun series spin-off of The Baby-sitters Club, featuring Kristy’s little stepsister!

Baby-Sitters Little Sister Vol. 5: Karen's School Picture

Harley Quinn: The Animated Series: The Eat. Bang! Kill. Tour (2021-) #6

Written by Tee Franklin
Pencils Max Sarin
Inks Max Sarin
Colored by Marissa Louise
Cover by Max Sarin
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While Ivy starts reflecting on what’s been happening these last few months after leaving Kite Man at the altar and joining Harley Quinn for a de facto, impromptu honeymoon across the DCU, new villain Mephitic makes himself known to Harley and Ivy at the Black Cat Lounge.

Harley Quinn: The Animated Series: The Eat. Bang! Kill. Tour (2021-) #6

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Vol. 1: Legends From Castle Grayskull

Written by Amanda Deibert
Art by Mike Anderson
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He-Man and the Masters of the Universe are back in this original graphic novel based on the hit Netflix show!

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Vol. 1: Legends From Castle Grayskull

Insane Jane: Doctors Without Patience

Written by Zach Hunchar
Art by Marcelo Henrique Santana
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What is Insane Jane: Doctors Without Patience? The first and only collected edition non-addictive treatment shown to prevent a relapse in reading boring comic books. Ask your doctor if this collected edition is right for you. * *Side-effects may include: Uncontrolled Giggling, Insomnia, Hiccups, Erectile Dysfunction, Undiagnosed Schizophrenia, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Addiction To Insane Jane.

Insane Jane: Doctors Without Patience

Magical Boy Vol. 1

Written by The Kao
Art by The Kao
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A breathtakingly imaginative fantasy series starring Max — a trans high school student who has to save the world as a “Magical Girl” . . . as a boy!

Magical Boy Vol. 1

Mr. Wolf’s Class Vol. 5: Snow Day

Written by Aron Nels Steinke
Art by Aron Nels Steinke
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A blizzard is coming to Hazelwood Elementary!

Mr. Wolf's Class Vol. 5: Snow Day

Squidding Around Vol. 3: Prank You Very Much

Written by Kevin Sherry
Art by Kevin Sherry
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This wonderfully silly young graphic novel from Graphix Chapters about fin-tastic friends is perfect for fans of The Bad Guys and Narwhal and Jelly!

Squidding Around Vol. 3: Prank You Very Much

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Review: The Joker #9

The Joker #9

James Gordon has been in pursuit of the Joker, funded by mysterious individuals who want the Clown Prince of Crime brought in and killed. Gordon has also had to deal with numerous other interested parties with the same interests and with a far higher likelihood to resort to violence to do that. The Joker #9 has Gordon teaming up with Vengeance, the clone daughter of Bane, to go after the Joker in the next location they think he might be.

James Tynion IV delivers an interesting issue with The Joker #9, one that opens up a massive world of possibilities. We learn there’s a bigger conspiracy going on, one involving cloning and doppelganger bodies. It’s a concept that seems somewhat farfetched, and that’s impressive for the world of Batman. While there’s a lot to like about where this issue could take not just this story but the DC Universe as a whole, there’s also something that feels a little rushed and out of leftfield. What was once a simple manhunt has turned into something greater. While that might explain some of the conspiracies and strange happenings in the DC world, it shifts the focus of the story quite a bit. It’s not longer one about a falsely accused Joker. And due to that, the issue and the series falters a bit. There’s an interesting aspect about a crime the Joker hadn’t committed yet everyone thinks he did. Some grand conspiracy involving DC’s criminals is something entirely different.

The issue does give a lot of history on Vengeance. So, if you want to get the details on the cloned daughter of Bane, this issue is for you.

Things aren’t helped by Stefano Raffaele‘s art which feels a little inconsistent in the comic. There’s moments the panels and pages look great and others where it feels a bit rushed. Characters don’t always hold up against themselves and the general look and feel of the comic can vary from one panel to the next. The look and style feels like a bunch of different creators all mashed into one. The color by Romulo Fajardo Jr. is solid giving a sickly green hue to the panels and pages at times, really nailing the tone of it all. Tom Napolitano‘s lettering also is good, especially that of the Joker whose style varies just enough to give it a unique feel that enhances the character.

Sam Johns, James Tynion IV, Rosi Kämpe, Marissa Louise, and Ariana Maher continues Punchline’s story. Leslie, Harper, and the newly protected Kelly dive deeper into Punchline’s history as we learn the fate of many of her past acquaintances. The story is interesting in that it shows Punchline’s dive into madness happened far earlier than has been depicted before but overall, it’s a piece of the very larger puzzle that’s being crafted as far as those characters. Not a lot of excitement with it but a lot of history that could become key.

The Joker #9 isn’t a bad issue but it just feels like it shifts the story far too much from the initial launch. Having various groups all trying to capture the same person could drive the series for quite a while and feels like it was just being touched as far as potential. This one issue shifts all of that in a major way. This is an issue to read because of its possible impact on the DC Universe, not necessarily because it does its story any justice.

Story: James Tynion, Sam Johns IV Art: Stefano Raffaele, Rosi Kämpe
Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr., Marissa Louise Letterer: Tom Napolitano, Ariana Maher
Story: 6.75 Art: 6.75 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: DC Pride #1

DC Pride #1

In honor of Pride Month, DC Comics dropped DC Pride #1, an 80 page anthology featuring short stories with LGBTQ+ characters by mainly LGBTQ+ creators. In addition to the stories, there’s an introduction by prominent gay comics writer Marc Andreyko (Manhunter, Love is Love) and pinups by some of the best LGBTQ+ artists (and artists period) like Sophie Campbell, Nick Robles, and Kevin Wada. The overall tone of the anthology is celebratory, but one story definitely made me tear up. I really enjoyed how DC Pride touched all corners of the LGBTQ umbrella and its exploration of how our differences make us stronger and really hope that one day all the characters featured in the book can have their own comic.

After the aforementioned introduction by Andreyko and a vibrant pinup of queer Teen Titans Aqualad, Bunker, Traci-13, and Crush from Travis Moore, DC Pride #1 leads off with a Batwoman story from James Tynion and Trung Le Nguyen. It starts with a look back at Kate Kane’s childhood, and how she didn’t conform to traditional gender roles and desires beginning with the games she would play with her sister Beth (Now the supervillain Alice) where they would pretend to be dolls complete with makeup, frilly dresses, and the accoutrements of traditional femininity. There’s almost a fairy tale cadence to both Tynion’s writing and Nguyen’s art as Kate grows up, finds love in the arms of a variety of women, and forges an identity as the superhero, Batwoman. Trung Le Nguyen’s flat reds and blacks punctuate these changes while James Tynion’s script takes a macro-level to the theme of pride as they show a montage of various queer heroes in the DC Universe fighting their battles and being themselves. This opening story is a fine encapsulation of Batwoman’s character journey and also is an ode to embracing queerness and gender conformity in a heteronormative world. Plus Nguyen’s story book style applied to superhero comics is a real visual treat.

estrano and midnighter

The next story was one of my favorites as Steve Orlando returns to Midnighter (kind of) and Extraño as the magician regales John Constantine with a tale of a night out with the violent vigilante. Orlando and artist Stephen Byrne’s story is pure fanservice and adventure in the best way with iconic visual and verbal moments like Midnighter punching a Nazi vampire’s head off and John Constantine flirting with Extraño at a bar and totally being open to a threesome with Extraño and his werewolf husband. This story is mostly made up of fun things like one-liners, magic, and mayhem. However, Steve Orlando digs a little deeper with his script and commentates on how queer history is rewritten by bigoted historians with lovers becoming relatives (Like in the original Sailor Moon English dub) or “pals” as Midnighter and Extraño fight the aforementioned vampire to stop him from casting a spell that makes people think the mythological heroes Achilles and Patroclus were cousins, not lovers. This is a very real issue, and it’s vindicating to watch Midnighter and Extraño kick the asses of those who would straight-wash history in a thrilling, beautiful way thanks to Orlando’s witty script and Byrne’s power-packed visuals.

The third story in DC Pride is a noir-tinged saga of dark alleys, fisticuffs, and political activism starring Renee Montoya aka The Question from Vita Ayala, Skylar Partridge, and Jose Villarrubia. The plot is fairly straightforward with the Question tracking down missing defense attorney and city council candidate Valeria Johnson. Partridge and Villarrubia bring the dark shadows, atmosphere, and flat background colors when Montoya puts the fear of her into some loutishly heterosexual goons. I love how Skylar Partridge uses inset panels to show Montoya’s speed and skill and match Ayala’s snappy narrative captions. The whole story looks gorgeous, and there’s also a hint of budding romance between Renee Montoya and Valeria Johnson as the latter isn’t just a do-gooder damsel in distress. It definitely feels like a backdoor pilot for a Renee Montoya Question series, and I would love to see more of this creative team fleshing her and her relationship with Valeria out.

The Question story is followed by a hilarious and touching Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy story from Mariko Tamaki, Amy Reeder, and Marissa Louise. Basically, this anti-heroic duo stop a plant monster from going on a rampage (After giving it several cute pet names.) and talk about their relationship. Underneath Louise’s candy-meets-body horror palette and Reeder’s memorable facial expressions and high-wire layouts, they chat about going from the “will they, won’t they” stage to the moving in and starting a life stage. Tamaki’s script is peppered with jokes (Including a classic lesbian U-Haul one.), but she also once and for all shows that Harley and Ivy are a well-matched, occasionally wacky queer couple, and that they’ve brought a lot of support and laughs into each other’s lives. Also, Harley’s hammer should always have a Kirby face on it.

Alan Scott and Obsidian

Full disclosure: Sam Johns, Klaus Janson, and Dave McCaig’s Alan Scott and Obsidian story was the one that made me cry. At brunch with Obsidian and his partner, the Golden Age Green Lantern opens up to his estranged son and tells him that Obsidian’s confidence to live as an out gay man encouraged him to finally come out and be his full, true self to the world. Janson uses nine panel grids, Ben-Day dots, and a command of 1940s fashion to show Alan’s secret romance with a train conductor named Jimmy and also walk down memory lane when being gay was a crime and gay bars were shuttered and didn’t have liquor licenses. As well as expanding on Alan Scott coming out in the main DC continuity in Infinite Frontier, this story is an homage to queer elders and their struggles in a world where they could be jailed or even killed holding someone of the same gender’s hand in public. It’s a beautiful intergenerational story and really made me fall in love with Alan Scott as a character even more. He’s the queer grandpa I never had.

The sixth story in DC Pride #1is a fast-moving, romantic story from Danny Lore, Lisa Sterle, and Enrica Erin Angiolini about Jess Chambers (Future State Flash) getting ready for their date with Andy Curry aka Aquawoman. This pair had fantastic chemistry in Future State: Justice League, and it’s nice to see a story centered around their relationship that also riffs on the classic Flash tropes of lateness, Rogues, and legacy. As Jess faces off against Reflek, who was trained by Mirror Master, Sterle and Angiolini get play with different panel shapes simulating the speedster trying to break free from a hall of mirrors while trying to get their outfit, makeup, and gift together. Also, it’s refreshing to see a story featuring a nonbinary character not be all about their gender identity, but focus on action and relationships like any other Flash story. Andy and Jess have a nice thing going, and like many of the other characters who appear in this anthology, I hope to see more of them, their impeccable fashion senses, and cool superpowers in future DC titles.

DC Pride #1 returns to the intergenerational queerness well in a Pied Piper story from Sina Grace, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt. They introduce a new character, Drummer Boy, who is inspired by Pied Piper to create mind-controlling beats so that he can take money from rich fat cats and save Central City’s gayborhood from gentrification, which is a very real problem in real life today. Drummer Boy calling out Pied Piper’s photo ops and not taking direct action since he’s been rich and famous is something that could be directed at many LGBTQ+ celebrities like Ru Paul, who literally uses his wealth to destroy the Earth. This issue creates a real fantasy in which LGBTQ+ celebrities help their community instead of palling around with war criminals at NFL games while Grace gets in some licks about being smart with one’s direct action and abilities when Pied Piper points out that if Drummer Boy steals money off rich people’s credit cards that they’ll just contest the charges. Drummer Boy has a real activist streak as a hero, and I love the energy that Stein and Brandt visually bring to his powers as well as not making him look like the average Ken-doll superhero body type.

The penultimate story in DC Pride #1introduces the transgender superhero Dreamer, who first appeared in the Supergirl television show, to the comics in a story written by Nicole Maines (Who played Dreamer in the show) and with art by Rachael Stott and Enrica Erin Angolini. Dreamer’s debut is a slice of story as she rushes to clean up a League of Shadows cell before rushing off to date night with Brainiac 5. Maines’ script has a cheery, humorous tone with a hilarious final panel, and Dreamer makes a lot of quips to go with Stott’s acrobatic fight choreography that is still good at showing motion even though her art style is more photorealistic. There’s a big feeling of wanting to get the fights over with so that Dreamer can spend time with the man she loves, and this story could honestly be one big metaphor for work/life balance. Dreamer makes her mark with charm and wholesomeness in the story, and her oneiromantic abilities have real visual flair.

Jackson Hyde

DC Pride #1 wraps up with a superhero spin on a big damn Pride parade with Andrew Wheeler, Luciano Vecchio, and Rex Lokus chronicling Aqualad’s first Pride since coming out with his new friend (and Extraño’s apprentice) Syl. Lokus’ colors match the tone of the story from bright and triumphant to dark and dreary as Eclipso has everyone at Pride airing out their worst thoughts and finally triumphant again with a group of DC’s LGBTQ+ superheroes led by Extraño saving the day and being the true, queer selves in the process. This story is a true victory lap, but Wheeler spends a little time in Aqualad’s head as he takes in the sights and sounds of Pride and also grapples with not wanting to be like his father, the villainous Black Manta. Even though everyone feels isolated and alone when targeted by Eclipso, there is actually a large, vibrant LGBTQ+ community of heroes in the DC Universe and hopefully they show up in stories beyond this anthology, which has honestly been a recurring theme as I read through the stories in DC Pride #1.

DC Pride #1 is a fantastic showcase not just for DC Comics’ LGBTQ+ characters, but the company’s LGBTQ+ creators too as they capture a range of relationships, feelings, sexualities, and gender identities. There’s a lot of focus on established romantic relationships, but some of the stories explore activism, community, and the Midnighter/Extrano/John Constantine is a straight up adventure yarn. I enjoyed seeing myself and my queer siblings uplifted in this comic and hope DC can do something more ongoing with these characters, situations, and especially creators.

Story: James Tynion IV, Steve Orlando, Vita Ayala, Mariko Tamaki
Sam Johns, Danny Lore, Sina Grace, Nicole Maines, Andrew Wheeler
Art: Trung Le Nguyen, Stephen Byrne, Skylar Partridge, Amy Reeder, Klaus Janson
Lisa Sterle, Ro Stein and Ted Brandt, Rachael Stott, Luciano Vecchio
Colors: Jose Villarrubia, Marissa Louise, Dave McCaig, Enrica Erin Angiolini, Rex Lokus
Letters: Aditya Bidikar, Josh Reed, Ariana Maher, Tom Napolitano, Becca Carey, Steve Wands
Story: 9.8 Art: 10 Overall: 9.9 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Discover Truth & Justice in Today’s Digital Releases

ComiXology and DC have you covered with new releases today. Truth & Justice #6 is available now.

Truth & Justice (2021-) #6

Written by Brandon M. Easton
Pencils Jahnoy Lindsay
Inks Jahnoy Lindsay
Colored by Marissa Louise
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As Clark tries to bring his article on the prison system to press, Superman comes face-to-face with the man behind the series of prison breaks from Stryker’s Island. Can Superman bring him to justice or will he make his own break for it?


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Review: Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1

Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1

Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1 kicks off a new DC digital series, this one a current exclusive to the new DC Universe Infinite digital app. The series is pretty straightforward and something many have wanted for a long time. It’s a digital series that will release comics that have been on the shelf for a long time.

Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1 kicks off with a story from writer Jim Zub and artist Tradd Moore featuring the Suicide Squad. The story, “Twenty-Minute Marathon” was Zub’s first script for the big two and done in 2011.

Zub and Moore deliver a simple Suicide Squad as they go on a mission to take out a target on behalf of Amanda Waller. There’s nothing complicated at all in the story. It’s a bit of the ole over the top violence with a nice dose of humor.

I love one and done comics and Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1 is exactly that. Zub and Moore deliver a story that could be continued if he chose to or you can just enjoy it on its own as well. What’s really solid is Zub’s use of the unknown in the comic. By the end, you’ll debate what you’d do yourself if you were in Deadshot’s position. Was it the right choice? Was Waller playing and lying to him? I don’t know the right answer to the situation. Walking away from the comic like that actually feels kind of cool and refreshing.

Moore’s art is top-notch. Felipe Sobreiro provides the colors with lettering by Nate Piekos. The art is full of comedic moments and the team captures the energetic glee and craziness of it all. Even the over the top violence brings laughs as to how Moore handles the brains splattering and blood flying.

Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1 is bookended with segments featuring Ambush Bug who introduces the concept of the comic. It’s a fun “Crypt Keeper”-like role for the character and it’d be fun to see him being used more to explain more of the history of the comic. We don’t get that here but writer Elliott Kalan, artist Mike Norton, colorist Marissa Louise, and letterer Saida Temofonte deliver some solid moments and more laughs in the issue.

As an unexpected and “free” comic on the DC Universe Infinite app, Let Them Live! Unpublished Tales From the DC Vault #1 is a solid read and start. Even when it eventually makes its way to other digital platforms and possibly print, it’s still well worth getting. We’re seeing DC realizing that digital platforms are taking the shackles off of them and opening up their ability to do releases like this. The fact they’re diving into standalone one-and-done comics is even better. It’s exactly what this platform is great at, quickly digestible content you can pick up and enjoy and escape for a little bit.

Story: Jim Zub, Elliott Kalan Art: Tradd Moore, Mike Norton
Color: Felipe Sobreiro, Marissa Louise Letterer: Nate Piekos, Saida Temofonte
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation Buy

It’s Truth and Justice and Romance in Today’s Digital Comic Releases

ComiXology has two new digital releases today on its platform. The latest issue of Truth & Justice from DC and a new romance manga from Harlequin is what’s available. Get shopping or check them out below.

Truth & Justice (2021-) #4

Written by Brandon M. Easton
Pencils Jahnoy Lindsay
Inks Jahnoy Lindsay
Colored by Marissa Louise
Cover by Emilio Lopez, Khary Randolph
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Prisoners around Metropolis are waking up in their old homes, unaware of how they got there and being accused of escaping from Stryker’s Island. Superman will need to use all of his powers, and his journalistic skills, if he’s going to save the prisoners and get them properly exonerated!

Truth & Justice (2021-) #4

Les Élans Du Cœur

Written by Nalini Singh
Art by Tomoko Takakura
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Taylor n’a plus le choix. Après avoir élevé son demi-frère maternel chéri pendant des d’années, son beau-père abusif demande soudainement sa garde afin d’avoir un héritier. Taylor raconte son histoire à son ancien chef, Jackson, qui lui fait une proposition surprenante : que Taylor et lui se marient le plus vite possible pour demander la garde de son frère. C’est vrai qu’avec un producteur de films talentueux et reconnu dans le monde entier pour mari, son beau-père aurait bien du mal à obtenir ce qu’il veut. Mais pourquoi cette proposition ? Leur relation n’a jamais été que professionnelle. Elle comprend très vite lorsque Jackson lui déclare : « je veux avoir un bébé dans l’année. »

Les Élans Du Cœur

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Preview: Sensational Wonder Woman #1

Sensational Wonder Woman #1

Written by Stephanie Phillips
Pencils Meghan Hetrick
Inks Meghan Hetrick
Colored by Marissa Louise
Cover by Yasmine Putri
Purchase: comiXologyAmazon

During a battle with Doctor Psycho, Wonder Woman sacrifices herself to stop the villain, only to be hit with a psychic blast that traps her in an alternate reality. With the help of Hawkgirl, Wonder Woman has to remember who she is before it’s too late.

Sensational Wonder Woman #1
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