Tag Archives: leila leiz

Review: Horde

Horde takes the very real problem of hoarding and adds a supernatural spin as well as using it as an examination of relationships.

Story: Marguerite Bennett
Art: Leila Leiz
Color: Guy Major
Letterer: Marshall Dillon

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

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AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Exclusive Preview: Horde OGN

HORDE OGN

Writer: Marguerite Bennett
Artist: Leila Leiz
Colorist: Guy Major
Letterer: Marshall Dillon
Cover: Leila Leiz
$19.99 / 72 pages / Full Color / ON SALE 10.23.2019

After the death of her father, Ruby Ando tries to reconnect with her estranged and isolated mother, whose hoarder house is a nightmare labyrinth of secrets and dangers. All the love Ruby was never shown she sees her mother lavish on her treasures and trinkets, the possessions that possess her. But when Ruby desperately tries to free her mother, the house wages war, ensnaring both women within its maze. Brought to hideous and twisted life by a mother’s love, the “Horde” is determined to purge Ruby from the collection—or see her join it forever.

Brought to life by Marguerite Bennett (ANIMOSITY, DC’s Bombshells, Batwoman) and Leila Leiz (ALTERS, Nvrlnd), HORDE is a haunting, housebound horror story about the things we let control us.

HORDE OGN

From Puerto Rico Strong to Strange Encounters, a New Kickstarter

Strange Encounters

Strange Encounters is a 64-page comic book Anthology about magic, mystery and the Strange Encounters that happen when you meet beings of the supernatural kind.

The graphic novel is from the team that brought you the Eisner Award-Winning and Diamond Gem Award-nominated, Puerto Rico Strong Anthology, Marco Lopez, Derek Ruiz, and Neil Schwartz

The anthology is made up of original tales, and stories adapted from some of the most popular novels and novellas from some of the most talented female authors in the supernatural prose genre today.

The team is aiming to bring you the next must-have anthology and it’s coming from the brand-new boutique label, King Skull Comics.

Just look at some of the talent involved.

Brett Booth variant cover
Brett Booth variant cover

Brett Booth is illustrating a KICKSTARTER EXCLUSIVE variant cover.

Mentioned earlier were prose authors. We’re talking Rue Volley (Hellhound, 13 Ways to Midnight), Kim Alexander (Pure, The Demon Door Series), JD Brown (Athena’s Oracle, The Ema Marx Series), and Rachel Rawlings (The Maurin Kincaide Series, Rotten Luck). Excited yet?

Let’s talk about some of the other artist’s and creators involved. We got Jose Marono, Ally Cat (Spread, Spook House), Jess Taylor (Catalyst Prime Summit, Adventure Time), Puis Calzada (Hatchet: Vengeance, Zorro: Rise of the Old Gods), Jamie Jones (The Baboon, Kicking Ice), DC Hopkins (IDW, Lion Forge, DC, BOOM! Studios, Dynamite) and Bryan Arfel Magnaye (Titan Comics, Chido Comics).

And if that’s not enough here are some character sketches from two of the stories in the anthology.

Hellhound Character Designs by Jose Marono
The Institutes Character Designs by Puis Calzada

The Kickstarter campaign offers a softcover trade in print and a digital PDF. Prints of both covers to hang on your wall and the option to be drawn in the short story, I Hate the South (From the Case Files of Izzy Desoto) as a monster of your choice. And for the amazing retailers out there because they love retailers, they’re also offering a Strange Encounters Retailer Pack at a fantastic discount.

But wait there’s more!

There are STRETCH GOALS! If the goals are met everyone that pledges will get a bookmark, a Strange Encounters Pin, a King Skull Comics Pin, mini prints by the incredible Leila Leiz (Alters, Horde) and Ariela Kristantina (Mata Hari, Adora and the Distance), a BOOKPLATE by Sweeney Boo (Marvel Action Captain Marvel, Eat and Love Yourself) signed by the prose authors and last but not least a PREMIUM sketch card by Brett Booth of his variant Kickstarter Exclusive cover. It’ll feel like the 90s all over again when holding that card in your hand.

Horde from Marguerite Bennett and Leila Leiz is Out this October

Announced at New York Comic Con in 2018, Horde from writer Marguerite Bennett, artist Leila Leiz, colorist Guy Major, and letterer Marshall Dillon is out October 16, 2019.

After the death of her father, Ruby Ando tries to reconnect with her estranged and isolated mother, whose hoarder house is a nightmare labyrinth of secrets and dangers. All the love Ruby was never shown she sees her mother lavish on her treasures and trinkets, the possessions that possess her. But when Ruby desperately tries to free her mother, the house wages war, ensnaring both women within its maze. Brought to hideous and twisted life by a mother’s love, the “Horde” is determined to purge Ruby from the collection—or see her join it forever.

Brought to life by Bennett and Leiz, Horde is a haunting, housebound horror story about the things we let control us.

Horde

Review: Alters #3

img_0057issue #3 of Alters picks up with Morph in semi-critical condition after a battle with Matter Man. Chalice, still coming into her powers, made a mistake in the last issue giving some members of the team with serious reservations about welcoming her fully into the fold. Chalice, still living as a male in day to day life, is feeling down on herself about the role she played in Morph’s condition. Her besty Darren knows something up but, is cool giving Chalice space to find the right time to come clean.

There’s a lot going on in this issue and it’s all good. The story gets pushed forward in a way that reminds you of why Alters is such a compelling series. The comic also gets bonus points for its trans representation. Chalice feels real and you get to watch her transformation into not only a women but, an alter. There’s something nice about the way Paul Jenkins portrays Chalice in both male and female roles. There is no trans angle, Chalice is just living her life trying to be who she is, it isn’t a big deal, the way it should be in real life.

The story in this issue is well written, honest, and superbly shown through Leila Leiz‘s simplistic yet detailed artwork. There is just enough information in each panel to give the reader a feeling of being swept into the story like a fly on the wall. The artwork combined with Jenkins open storytelling skills makes Alters #3 a great read and a nice continuation of not only Chalice’s story but, the world of Alters that he has created in this series.

I enjoyed reading this issue and the series itself has been solid, even though we’re only three issues in I feel for the characters and enjoy the world that has been created and the characters that live in it. There are no wasted panels or word and everything seems real and unforced. This issue was no exception to the momentum and expectations the previous two issues set up, in fact, the series seems to be getting stronger and better with each new issue.

Story: Paul Jenkins Art: Leila Leiz
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Aftershock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Alters #1

alters-1Issue #1 of wrier Paul Jenkin‘s Alters starts off like every other comic book origin story. At least that’s what I thought I was getting myself into. Another origin story, with super villains, super heroes and those with powers who refuse to join the penultimate battle. The cover art lead me to believe that I was in in for a fun little side step along the lines of Powers, Misfits or Gotham the TV show. I was wrong.

Alters is way more than just your average super powered human origin story because Chalice, is way more than your typical super-powered human. Chalice has recently come into her powers and she’s not quite sure what to do with them yet. She’s still trying to figure out how to use them. Her first go at flying took her from her hometown of Cleveland to NYC where she crashed into a wall. Chalice uses all of the teenage snark that you’d expect from a super powered human who’s just discovered she can do what she wants. There’s something refreshing about her honesty. She openly admits all that she doesn’t know about her powers. She laments about how no on does it right the first time. She’s real.

Chalice uses all of the teenage snark that you’d expect from a super powered human who’s just discovered she can do what she wants. There’s something refreshing about her honesty. She openly admits all that she doesn’t know about her powers. She laments about how no on does it right the first time. She’s real.In Chalice’s world, being a human with powers is still very rare and not exactly the best thing because one of the supers “Matter Man” went rogue and is pretty much holding the US hostage because he’s unstoppable. He’s forcing all Alters who come into their powers to report directly to him. If the don’t he throws a temper tantrum and goes on a destructive rampage.

In Chalice’s world, being a human with powers is still very rare and not exactly the best thing because one of the supers “Matter Man” went rogue and is pretty much holding the US hostage because he’s unstoppable. He’s forcing all Alters who come into their powers to report directly to him. If the don’t he throws a temper tantrum and goes on a destructive rampage. Chalice is discovered by a group of Alters who are standing against Matter Man and they try to recruit Chalice during her fall from grace , building bounce during her flight to NYC. Alters is extremely well written and with just this aspect of the story alone, Alters could have been a huge hit, maybe even a TV show or movie. But, Paul Jenkins doesn’t rest on the typical story, or the comedy flair campy version of a person with powers. Paul takes it a step further. Our sassy and brave superhero in the making isn’t just a cis-girl, she’s transgender. This isn’t a review on that aspect, that’s for others to weigh in on and Jenkins has said he has consulted with and talked to transgender individuals to get things right.

It’s a bold choice and it plays very well into the story as the series seems to be focusing on identity as a whole. The revelation of Chalice’s gender identity doesn’t feel like a gimmick, it was a thought out decision that’s an important aspect of the story and adds a level of depth. The tone of the story and of Chalice’s identity adds a layer to her and, her struggles aren’t written for sensationalism, they’re written as life. It feels like there’s so much realism in Chalice’s hiding who she is from those in her real life when she’s out of the mask. You can feel her pain and longing for acceptance. She’s a real person with feelings who’s going through some very real things and the compassion and care that Jenkins takes to developing this character is amazing.

Often in media we see sexuality and gender identity used heavyhandedly to sensationalize or add a shock factor to a story, in Alters it seems organic. You can feel every emotion that the hiding of who she is causes her. You cringe at the deceptions she has to engage at to keep herself safe & the people she loves in the dark. Despite how strong she is, you find yourself wanting to reach through the pages, hug her and, tell her it’s going to be alright. Chalice seems like a real person, which is a testament to the great story and brilliant writing in this series.

Story: Paul Jenkins Art: Leila Leiz
Story: 8.9 Art: 8.3 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Aftershock Comics provided a FREE copy to Graphic Policy for review

Review: NVRLND #1

NVRLND #1The story of Peter Pan is a classic having been adapted numerous times and who knows how many “alternate takes” exist at this point. Enter NVRLND, a new (and original) take on the classic tale.

Written by Stephanie Salyers and Dylan Mulick, the setting is now present-day Hollywood. Peter is the lead singer of the band The Lost Boys, Wendy Darling befriends Tiger Lily in high school, and there’s a new designer drug called Pixie Dust which kids are dying from using. James Hook is present too, this version a tattoo artist who preys on those who flock to Peter and his band.

The story is entertaining with fantastic pacing for a first issue. It drops you right into the action building this new, yet familiar world. Everything is there and how it all comes together is interesting and feels like it’s a rock and fantasy version of Law & Order: SVU. How it comes together is the fun and interesting part. Seeing how each character is depicted is not only fascinating, but also what really sets the series apart from other takes. Even with so many iterations of the characters and story, Salyers and Mulick still find a unique spin to it all. And it’s a spin that has me wanting to come back to see more and where it goes.

Salyers and Mulick also give each character a very unique personality. Each feels like their own person with their own habits, quirks, and how they act. You can see why some act the way they do and each character’s actions make complete sense considering age and setting. While it’s a fantasy, it still feels natural.

Helping that unique spin is artist Leila Leiz who gives us a style that has a Western look infused a bit with manga. The design and style pops on the page creating a look that matches the pop and rock sensibility of it all. Though it’s set in the “real world,” the design and look still feels like it fits the classic story that we know.

The first issue of NVRLND does an excellent job of setting things up with all of the familiar characters we know, but at the same time giving each enough of a unique spin to make it all feel original. I’ll admit I rolled my eyes when I heard that it was another take on Peter Pan, but having read the first issue, I’m looking forward to see what comes next.

Story: Stephanie Salyers and Dylan Mulick Art: Leila Leiz
Story: 8.1 Art: 8.1 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Buy

451 Media Group provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Early Review: NVRLND #1

NVRLND #1The story of Peter Pan is a classic having been adapted numerous times and who knows how many “alternate takes” exist at this point. Enter NVRLND, a new (and original) take on the classic tale.

Written by Stephanie Salyers and Dylan Mulick, the setting is now present-day Hollywood. Peter is the lead singer of the band The Lost Boys, Wendy Darling befriends Tiger Lily in high school, and there’s a new designer drug called Pixie Dust which kids are dying from using. James Hook is present too, this version a tattoo artist who preys on those who flock to Peter and his band.

The story is entertaining with fantastic pacing for a first issue. It drops you right into the action building this new, yet familiar world. Everything is there and how it all comes together is interesting and feels like it’s a rock and fantasy version of Law & Order: SVU. How it comes together is the fun and interesting part. Seeing how each character is depicted is not only fascinating, but also what really sets the series apart from other takes. Even with so many iterations of the characters and story, Salyers and Mulick still find a unique spin to it all. And it’s a spin that has me wanting to come back to see more and where it goes.

Salyers and Mulick also give each character a very unique personality. Each feels like their own person with their own habits, quirks, and how they act. You can see why some act the way they do and each character’s actions make complete sense considering age and setting. While it’s a fantasy, it still feels natural.

Helping that unique spin is artist Leila Leiz who gives us a style that has a Western look infused a bit with manga. The design and style pops on the page creating a look that matches the pop and rock sensibility of it all. Though it’s set in the “real world,” the design and look still feels like it fits the classic story that we know.

The first issue of NVRLND does an excellent job of setting things up with all of the familiar characters we know, but at the same time giving each enough of a unique spin to make it all feel original. I’ll admit I rolled my eyes when I heard that it was another take on Peter Pan, but having read the first issue, I’m looking forward to see what comes next.

Story: Stephanie Salyers and Dylan Mulick Art: Leila Leiz
Story: 8.1 Art: 8.1 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Buy

451 Media Group provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review