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Review: Broken Gargoyles Vol. 1 Of Wrath

Welcome to an alternate history after World War I. The world is now filled with dieselpunk technology. Two soldiers, both scarred, come home from the war. Each has a very different path.

Story: Bob Salley
Art: Stan Yak
Chapter 3 Roughs/Layout: Mike Lilly
Color: Robert Nugent
Letterer: Justin Birch

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Bookshop


Source Point Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Children of the Grave #4

Earth has been reset. Now known as Terra, the populace lives in blissful ignorance of the centuries of unrest that plagued mankind. They’re taken care of by the “Providers”. Daniel is determined to find the truth.

Children of the Grave #4 has the truth revealed but what will Daniel do about it?

Story: Sam Romesburg, Ben Roberts
Art: Gioele Filippo
Color: Sara Filippo
Letterer: Justin Birch

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Scout Comics
Zeus Comics


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Stargazer TPB

Stargazer

Missing person or alien abduction? This is the question Shae must answer in Stargazer. Written by Anthony Cleveland, Stargazer is part mystery and part science-fiction thriller. Published by Mad Cave Studios, this six issue series is due for release as a trade paperback on April 28th. When they were kids, Shae and her brother Kenny witnessed something unexplainable. As the siblings grew up, each sought to explain what they saw in their own ways. Shae chose the path of science while Kenny seemed to dive deep into delusions about what happened that night. Years later, Kenny disappears, and Shae must reunite with their old group of friends to track him down and discover the truth of what they saw when they were children.

Stargazer has a great balance of scenes set in the past and scenes set in the present. Cleveland mixes the two together well, combining them into a straightforward narrative. The story moves at a brisk pace with emotional beats and tense moments sprinkled in all the right places. Like any good mystery or sci-fi thriller, there’s more happening beneath the surface of the narrative than meets the eye. The plot has a lot of moving pieces, but Cleveland does a nice job of fitting them all together.

Antonio Fuso’s artwork is a bit uneven from one panel to the next, but I like how expressively he draws the characters’ faces. The character designs are clear enough for the reader to tell each character apart while being distinct enough to distinguish scenes set in the past from those set in the present. As a result, it’s always easy to visually follow the events of story. Each issue collected in this trade paperback features distinct page layouts. Fuso plays around with the frames of each panel, giving each page a dynamic look. I really enjoyed seeing characters “break the fourth wall,” in a manner of speaking, as they reached past or through the framing of each panel.

Stargazer is an emotionally charged and thrilling science-fiction adventure. I try not to use this phrase, but this graphic novel warrants an exception: once you start reading, you won’t be able to put this book down. It’s a fast paced read with as many loud action beats as it has quiet emotional moments. The artwork is unique, even though the quality of the linework varies in spots. Fans of sci-fi comics will want to add this book to their collections.

Story: Anthony Cleveland Art: Antonio Fuso
Color: Stefano Simeone Letterer Justin Birch
Story: 9.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Mad Cave Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonTFAW

Review: Children of the Grave #3

Earth has been reset. Now known as Terra, the populace lives in blissful ignorance of the centuries of unrest that plagued mankind. They’re taken care of by the “Providers”. Daniel is determined to find the truth.

Children of the Grave #3 reveals the truth as to what’s going on and it’s not what we expected!

Story: Sam Romesburg, Ben Roberts
Art: Gioele Filippo
Color: Marco Lesko
Letterer: Justin Birch

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Scout Comics
Zeus Comics

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion

Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion

I’ve never played a game of Gloomhaven. I’ve heard good things about the legacy dungeon crawler but it’s a commitment I don’t have time for. Beyond the fantasy setting, I know little of the world and after reading Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion, I’m not sure I know all that much.

Welcome to the City of Gloomhaven. A city we don’t get to see much of as a lot of the comic takes place within a bar. The Jaws of the Lion are a the top of the hierarchy of the city, but their latest job goes sideways. Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion takes us through the group’s adventure in segments told from a different member’s perspective.

I’m not sure if it was high-hopes for a new comic series based on a board game or the interest in a “new” property being expanded to comics, but the potential of the debut issue feels squandered. Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion is one that feels more focused on fans of the property than an introduction to that property for all, that also is entertaining for fans.

Written by Travis Mcintire, the comic has a fine concept, a band of adventurers talking about a job gone wrong. But, there’s little setup and little to make us care about the characters. The adventure is just that, a fairly generic adventure with a different set of characters. We’re not given much background on any them, their powers, race, really anything. Unless you know the world or the specific characters, it all feels a bit lost. There’s some personality in each but beyond one’s unique dialogue they’re all pretty basic fantasy characters with a different look.

The teaser text for the comic hinted at punk bands, drug dealing street gangs, and a dark God sleeping underneath the city. None of that’s really here at all. There’s some things danced around but as far as the city, we see the inside of a bar and the direct outside of it again leaving us with a very generic premise of a comic.

With art by Tyler Sowles and lettering by Justin Birch, the art too is interesting but doesn’t quite click for me. The design, class, and race of the characters are something that appealed to me. But the action itself felt a little lackluster and the scenes within the tavern outright boring. With a story that doesn’t give much background about the characters, the art needed to deliver a bit more to clue readers in. Birch’s lettering stands out a bit for its unique style concerning one character made of bugs. That was the most intriguing design of the entire comic.

Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion had a lot of potential as a comic. Something different such as an introduction to the game and its elements might have stood out. But, as presented, this is a pretty boring presentation of the world and its characters. Any interesting elements feel sucked out leaving us with a generic fantasy story that’s been done so much better elsewhere.

Gloomhaven created by Isaac Childres
Story: Travis Mcintire Art: Tyler Sowles Letterer: Justin Birch
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Read

Source Point Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: Source Point PresscomiXology

Review: Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion

Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion

I’ve never played a game of Gloomhaven. I’ve heard good things about the legacy dungeon crawler but it’s a commitment I don’t have time for. Beyond the fantasy setting, I know little of the world and after reading Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion, I’m not sure I know all that much.

Welcome to the City of Gloomhaven. A city we don’t get to see much of as a lot of the comic takes place within a bar. The Jaws of the Lion are a the top of the hierarchy of the city, but their latest job goes sideways. Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion takes us through the group’s adventure in segments told from a different member’s perspective.

I’m not sure if it was high-hopes for a new comic series based on a board game or the interest in a “new” property being expanded to comics, but the potential of the debut issue feels squandered. Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion is one that feels more focused on fans of the property than an introduction to that property for all, that also is entertaining for fans.

Written by Travis Mcintire, the comic has a fine concept, a band of adventurers talking about a job gone wrong. But, there’s little setup and little to make us care about the characters. The adventure is just that, a fairly generic adventure with a different set of characters. We’re not given much background on any them, their powers, race, really anything. Unless you know the world or the specific characters, it all feels a bit lost. There’s some personality in each but beyond one’s unique dialogue they’re all pretty basic fantasy characters with a different look.

The teaser text for the comic hinted at punk bands, drug dealing street gangs, and a dark God sleeping underneath the city. None of that’s really here at all. There’s some things danced around but as far as the city, we see the inside of a bar and the direct outside of it again leaving us with a very generic premise of a comic.

With art by Tyler Sowles and lettering by Justin Birch, the art too is interesting but doesn’t quite click for me. The design, class, and race of the characters are something that appealed to me. But the action itself felt a little lackluster and the scenes within the tavern outright boring. With a story that doesn’t give much background about the characters, the art needed to deliver a bit more to clue readers in. Birch’s lettering stands out a bit for its unique style concerning one character made of bugs. That was the most intriguing design of the entire comic.

Gloomhaven: Fallen Lion had a lot of potential as a comic. Something different such as an introduction to the game and its elements might have stood out. But, as presented, this is a pretty boring presentation of the world and its characters. Any interesting elements feel sucked out leaving us with a generic fantasy story that’s been done so much better elsewhere.

Gloomhaven created by Isaac Childres
Story: Travis Mcintire Art: Tyler Sowles Letterer: Justin Birch
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Read

Source Point Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: Source Point Press

Review: Children of the Grave #1

Earth has been reset. Now known as Terra, the populace lives in blissful ignorance of the centuries of unrest that plagued mankind. They’re taken care of by the “Providers”. Daniel is determined to find the truth.

Children of the Grave #1 kicks off a new series delivering a solid blend of psychological horror and sci-fi.

Story: Sam Romesburg, Ben Roberts
Art: Gioele Filippo
Color: Marco Lesko
Letterer: Justin Birch

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Scout Comics

Preview: Knights of the Golden Sun #8

Knights of the Golden Sun #8

(W) Mark London (A/C) Mauricio Villarreal (L) Justin Birch

The Archangels are back! With Metatron on the run, and Lucifer nowhere to be found, the Archangels must scour the Earth for the pieces of God’s Armor in order to prevent them from bringing destruction upon the world the likes of which have only been hinted at through the annals of history!

Knights of the Golden Sun #8

Review: Sea of Sorrows #1

Sea of Sorrows #1

The team behind the horror series Road of Bones is back with Sea of Sorrows #1. Moving from the frozen tundra of Siberia, the new horror setting for the duo of Rich Douek and Alex Cromack takes us to the deep sea. With the Great War over, the North Atlantic is filled with riches. The story focuses on a former naval officer who hires a crew to retrieve gold on a sunken U-boat. With riches within reach, tension builds leading to double-crosses while a terror below awaits them all.

Douek and Cormack have put together a hell of a start that feels like a solid period piece. The build throughout the issue adds tension with each page until it’s clear by the end this is a where few can be trusted and most likely few will make it out alive.

But, what’s interesting about this debut is its underlying theme of corruption and an attempt to escape horror. Some of the individuals are haunted by what they did during the war. Others have history with each other that’s at play. And some prefer the icy waters and the peace they bring. There’s a haunting melancholy about it all and the comic can easily be imagined on the big screen.

Some of that is helped by how the comic is presented visually. There’s something more cinematic about it in its more grounded look. Set in a post Great War, Cormack’s art has a lived in look to it with small details emphasizing a real world. That’s helped by the color which Cormack also did with an assist by Mark Mullaney. There’s a gritty dirtiness about it all. Visually, and even storywise, the comic reminds me of Jaws where our trio of heroes recount stories of being hurt and the recounting of the Indianapolis in World War II. The sadness felt in that scene extends to this comic delivering a mature beginning that’s more about haunting tension than actual scares. Justin Birch‘s lettering is solid and stands out when needed to emphasize the supernatural and horror elements that are peppered through the issue.

Sea of Sorrows #1 is a solid debut delivering a period piece of horror. The comic is more focused on building tension for what’s to come than deliver scares. It’s a psychological angle than cheap thrills. Like Road of Bones‘, Sea of Sorrows #1 is a hell of a start and perfect for those who are looking for a cold frightening chill in these fall and winter months.

Story: Rich Douek Art: Alex Cormack
Color: Alex Cormack, Mark Mullaney Letterer: Justin Birch
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Mad Cave Studios’ Knights of the Golden Sun plus Honor and Curse Are Back for a Second Arc!

Two first wave titles that put Mad Cave Studios on the comics map are making an exciting return! It was an easy decision for writer Mark London to bring the second arc of Knights of the Golden Sun—now blending even more history and fantasy with biblical elements, all perfectly captured in the intricate and detailed art by Nicolas Salamanca with an exclusive variant by Adam Gorham—as well as the return of Genshi, the Tengu, Akemi, and the rest of the Iga back shinobi thriller, Honor and Curse, featuring art by Mauricio Villarreal.

Knights of the Golden Sun #8

(W) Mark London (A/C) Mauricio Villarreal (L) Justin Birch
Release Date: December 2, 2020

The Archangels are back! With Metatron on the run, and Lucifer nowhere to be found, the Archangels must scour the Earth for the pieces of God’s Armor in order to prevent them from bringing destruction upon the world the likes of which have only been hinted at through the annals of history!

“To be able to continue working on Knights of the Golden Sun is exhilarating,” said Mark London. “Not only because I can continue working on a story that we have set out to do from the beginning, but because I’m in love with these characters and I truly enjoy working with Mauricio. It’s  a story about the archangels and their struggles as a family. It’s about facing doomsday scenarios that are bigger than anything the world has ever seen. It’s going to be a wild ride… just like everything Mad Cave does.” 

“I’ve always loved being a part of this project because I love epic stories that take place in amazing worlds, and that is exactly what Knights of the Golden Sun is,” said Mauricio Villarreal. “In volume two, we are going to explore a much larger world filled with all sorts of fantastical creatures as well as even more historical figures than the last volume.”

Knights of the Golden Sun #8

Honor and Curse #7

(W) Mark London (A) Nicolas Salamanca (C) Tekino (L) Miguel Zapata
Release Date: January, 6, 2021

Left reeling after the murder of Lord Haruki, Genshi makes his way to the Jade Caverns per Nishiro’s instructions. Meanwhile, Akemi took control of the Iga and is training like never before to defend her clan from potential threats… like the rival Koga clan who are looking to seize the opportunity presented by Lord Haruki’s death. 


“When I first came up with the idea for Honor and Curse, it was supposed to be a straightforward ninja tale with some historical elements and tons of action,” said Mark London. “However, once I started diving into the research, I became fascinated by all of the mythology surrounding the era and the story morphed into what it is today; a story about a talented ninja possessed by an evil mountain spirit known as a Tengu. With the fantastic art that Nicolas and Tekino bring to the table, I can’t wait for the fans to see what we have in store for Genshi, Akemi, and the rest of the Iga clan.”

Honor and Curse is a comic that I have a lot of affection for, not only because of the fact that it is set in feudal Japan, but it has allowed me to grow as an artist,” said Nicolas Salamanca. “I definitely consider it an honor and not a curse to continue working with Mark and Tekino on this incredible story.”

Honor and Curse #7
Almost American
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