Tag Archives: john adams

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Ominous Omnibus Vol. 2 delivers laughs and scares like the cartoons

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Ominous Omnibus Vol. 2 Deadtime Stories for Boos & Ghouls delivers laughs and scares just like the cartoons

The second of three volumes collecting the complete Simpsons Treehouse of Horror comics by creator Matt Groening-packaged in a deluxe, die-cut slipcase that glows in the dark

Collected for the first time in a deluxe hardcover slipcase with an all-new die-cut cover.

Story: Kyle Baker, James W. Bates, Ian Boothby, Max Davison, Chuck Dixon, Gerry Duggan, Glenn Fabry, Pia Guerra, John Kerschnbaum, Peter Kuper, Carol Lay, Ted May, Jesse Leon McCann, Gary Spencer Millidge, Terry Moore, Steve Niles, Troy Nixey, Brian Posehn, Dean Rankine, James Robinson, Scott Shaw!, Gene Simmons, Will Sweeney, Matthew Thurber, Jim Valentino, Jon Vermilyea, Len Wein, Shannon Wheeler, Jane Wiedlin, Jim Woodring, Chris Yambar, Neil Alsip, Tony Di Gerolamo

Art: Max Badger, Kyle Baker, Hilary Barta, Dan Brereton, John Delaney, Glenn Fabry, Pia Guerra, Sammy Harkham, Tom Hodges, Kevin Huizenga, John Kerschbaum, Peter Kruper, Carol Lay, James Lloyd, Nina Matsumoto, Gary Specer Millidge, Terry Moore, Bill Morrison, Troy Nixey, Phil Ortiz, Dean Rankine, Tone Rodriguez, Scott Shaw!, Will Sweeney, Jim Valentino, Jon Vermilyea, Jim Woodring, John Adams, Norm Auble, Bryan Francis, Christianna Lang, Abel Lacamana, William Mahoney, Istvan Majoros, Scott McRae, Kevin M. Newman, Joey Nilges, Robert Oliver, Ryan Rivette, Aaron Rozenfeld, Horacio Sandoval, Alberto Santiago

Layouts: Chris Roman

Ink: Terry Austin, Tim Bavington, Tom Hodges, Phyllis Novin, Andrew Pepoy, Mike Rote

Color: Nathan Hamill, Nathan Kane, Joey Mason, Ted May, Rick Reese, Robert Stanley, Dave Stewart, Christopher Ungar, Art Villanueva

Letterer: Karen Bates, Gary Spencer Millidge, Mike Sakamoto, Christopher Ungar

Editor: Sammy Harkham, Nathan Kane, Bill Morrison

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Bookshop
Amazon


Abrams Comicarts provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Ominous Omnibus Vol. 2 delivers laughs and scares like the cartoons

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Ominous Omnibus Vol. 2 Deadtime Stories for Boos & Ghouls delivers laughs and scares just like the cartoons

The second of three volumes collecting the complete Simpsons Treehouse of Horror comics by creator Matt Groening-packaged in a deluxe, die-cut slipcase that glows in the dark

Collected for the first time in a deluxe hardcover slipcase with an all-new die-cut cover.

Story: Kyle Baker, James W. Bates, Ian Boothby, Max Davison, Chuck Dixon, Gerry Duggan, Glenn Fabry, Pia Guerra, John Kerschnbaum, Peter Kuper, Carol Lay, Ted May, Jesse Leon McCann, Gary Spencer Millidge, Terry Moore, Steve Niles, Troy Nixey, Brian Posehn, Dean Rankine, James Robinson, Scott Shaw!, Gene Simmons, Will Sweeney, Matthew Thurber, Jim Valentino, Jon Vermilyea, Len Wein, Shannon Wheeler, Jane Wiedlin, Jim Woodring, Chris Yambar, Neil Alsip, Tony Di Gerolamo

Art: Max Badger, Kyle Baker, Hilary Barta, Dan Brereton, John Delaney, Glenn Fabry, Pia Guerra, Sammy Harkham, Tom Hodges, Kevin Huizenga, John Kerschbaum, Peter Kruper, Carol Lay, James Lloyd, Nina Matsumoto, Gary Specer Millidge, Terry Moore, Bill Morrison, Troy Nixey, Phil Ortiz, Dean Rankine, Tone Rodriguez, Scott Shaw!, Will Sweeney, Jim Valentino, Jon Vermilyea, Jim Woodring, John Adams, Norm Auble, Bryan Francis, Christianna Lang, Abel Lacamana, William Mahoney, Istvan Majoros, Scott McRae, Kevin M. Newman, Joey Nilges, Robert Oliver, Ryan Rivette, Aaron Rozenfeld, Horacio Sandoval, Alberto Santiago

Layouts: Chris Roman

Ink: Terry Austin, Tim Bavington, Tom Hodges, Phyllis Novin, Andrew Pepoy, Mike Rote

Color: Nathan Hamill, Nathan Kane, Joey Mason, Ted May, Rick Reese, Robert Stanley, Dave Stewart, Christopher Ungar, Art Villanueva

Letterer: Karen Bates, Gary Spencer Millidge, Mike Sakamoto, Christopher Ungar

Editor: Sammy Harkham, Nathan Kane, Bill Morrison

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Bookshop
Amazon


Abrams Comicarts provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Killadelphia #4

KILLADELPHIA #4

Rodney Barnes and Jason Shawn Alexander’s Killadelphia has been setting its sights high since the very first issue. It established conflicting racial politics and creates a history that dates back to early independent America. A time when the Founding Fathers still roamed the land. One of them turns out to be a vampire looking to start a revolution of his own in present times. A vampire revolution. Killadelphia #4 is where that revolution starts, where we hear the first shot of the vampire uprising. It’s loud enough to become the new ‘shot heard around the world.’

Father and son James and Jim Sangster along with chief medical examiner Jose Padilla have stumbled across several big pieces of the larger puzzle, namely that President John Adams is patient zero of the vampire virus and that some of Philadelphia’s poorer neighborhoods have become his personal vampiric breeding grounds. Our merry group of novice vampire hunters is worried about the conquest-level amounts of bloodsuckers that are awaiting their orders, but they still don’t know when it’s all going to go down. This fourth issue is when everything starts.

Barnes’ script and Shawn Alexander’s art never waste an opportunity to comment on the fact that most of Adams’ vampire army is composed of black people. This is interesting because Adams is widely regarded as one of the few Founding Father to have not owned slaves. The actual facts behind this are somewhat muddy as the President did hire white and free black servants but also rented out slaves from slave owners, paying a service fee for their employment.

On top of that, Adams tolerated slavery and was very much a man of his time, meaning he might not hold up in a court of public opinion in today’s political climate (or perhaps he would’ve, given the state of things). This might say something about the drive behind his vampire revolution, especially in terms of how traditional or nuanced his perceived villainy will end up being.

It doesn’t seem like Barnes and Shawn Alexander are looking to frame Adams as a mere ‘white bad guy’ type of character for Killadelphia. The next two issues should reveal a lot more about the agendas pushed forward by the second President of the United States. The race dynamic between the white leader and the black vampires speaks volumes, but just exactly what it’s truly meant to represent is still up for debate.

I will say, while I am completely invested in the series and have loved how dense each entry has been, I did feel the revolution started a bit early. I could’ve done with two more issues of world building and perhaps more exploration of the vampires themselves. Issue #4 takes a plunge into big story developments and, while exciting, it does feel a bit rushed.

Shawn Alexander’s art continues to impress. It really digs into the grittiness of the setting, but it also plays with realism in a way that keeps the more fantastical elements of the story grounded. It heightens the horror and continues to produce some nasty-looking vampires.

Luis NCT’s colors, on the other hand, do a fantastic job of helping the art maintain a balance between its fantasy and its realism. They have a way of accentuating the more visceral sequences while also setting the tone for the moments that need an additional dose of darkness to really be effective. Visually, this comic is a well-oiled machine. The script wraps itself around this beautifully.

Killadelphia #4 speeds things up quite a bit—perhaps a bit too quickly—but the quality of the storytelling hasn’t dipped not one bit. There are traces of Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend here, and even a bit of Candyman in terms of ambiance. I’m eager to see what else gets thrown in the ring, because we got a vampire revolution firing up and it looks like it’s about to get real bloody.

Story: Rodney Barnes Art: Jason Shawn Alexander Colors: Luis NCT
Story: 8.0 Art: 10 Overall: 9.0
Recommendation: Buy, and then make sure it’s in your pull list

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Choice Quotes

While there wasn’t anything worthy of a post last week, this week makes up for it in one entire book.

DC Universe: Decisions #2

In 1797, John Adams succeeded George Washington to become the second President of the United States.  It was the first time in recorded human history that a great nation transferred power to a nonfamilial relation without battle or bloodshed.  The right of Americans to choose our leaders in free and open elections is the true cornerstone of our country’s liberty.  To vote, to cast one’s ballot, is a simple and sacred privilege.  It speaks to the power of the individual.  This nation overflows with opinion, with hopes, with desires, many of which can only be accomplished with the stewardship of great leaders.  We should welcome the debate.  We should embrace the discourse.  The importance of our choices is without measure, and so we should revel in our differences and lend an ear.  To decide, we need to listen.

Also:

Green Lantern – We don’t do this!  We don’t campaign for politicians!

Green Arrow – I endorsed a candidate, I’m not canvassing neighborhoods!

And:

Lois Lane – We’re spending so much time promoting what costumed heroes think and feel that we’re distracting from the real story — which is the issues and the perspective of these people running for office.