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Get a Look at Saladin Ahmed & Sami Kivelä’s Abbott: 1973 #3 from BOOM!

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Abbott: 1973 #3, the latest issue of the new series from Miles Morales: Spider-Man mastermind and Eisner Award-winning writer Saladin Ahmed and acclaimed artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. This new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it, available in March 2021.

The dark forces terrorizing Detroit have struck Elena Abbott where it hurts most…and she’s going to strike back. But even after pulling together an uneasy alliance with the last people she expected, Abbott is about to learn her enemies are one step ahead of her… and it might cost her the person she loves most.

Abbott: 1973 #3 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Dani with colors by Tamra Bonvillain. It will be available for sale on March 17, 2021.

ABBOTT: 1973 #3

Your First Look at Sci-Fi Epic Origins #5

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Origins #5, the latest issue in the limited series by acclaimed writer Clay McLeod Chapman, illustrator Jakub Rebelka, colorist Patricio Delpeche, and letterer Jim Campbell, that presents a stunning view of a future where humanity’s last hope may be the person who brought about its destruction, available in March 2021.

After reaching his long-buried workshop, David, Chloe, and his robot followers must make one final stand to protect their future. But the Network has a secret weapon and will stop at nothing from achieving their ultimate goal of destroying all organic life.

Origins #5 features a main and variant covers by Rebelka and will be available for sale on March 17, 2021.

Origins #5

All Star Creators Join Jim Henson’s The Storyteller: Tricksters

BOOM! Studios has announced the creative teams for all four issues of Jim Henson’s The Storyteller: Tricksters, a comic book series based on the Emmy Award-winning classic television show, Jim Henson’s The Storyteller, presenting several extraordinary folk tales of legendary tricksters from the four corners of the world. Each issue will feature a new creative team, with the first issue, by writer Jonathan Rivera, artist Jade Zhang, and letterer Jim Campbell, featuring the most famous trickster of all—Anansi, available on March 17, 2021.

Fans of this fantastical series can also look forward to even more stories about their favorite tricksters of legend with the second issue, written by The New York Times bestselling YA author Jordan Ifueko and illustrated by rising star artist Erin Kubo, featuring a teen Yoruba village girl who matches wits against the great god of mischief, Eshu; the third issue, written by poet and Hugo Award-winning author Amal El-Mohtar and illustrated by cartoonist Isa Hanssen, about the legendary fox Reynard and his scheme to get rich quick, and the fourth issue by cartoonist Robin Kaplan and illustrator and comics artist A.L. Kaplan featuring gods Loki and Thor as they crash the wedding of the century!

Jim Henson’s The Storyteller: Tricksters will feature main cover art by artist Peach Momoko and variant cover art by artist Dani Pendergast.

Jim Henson's The Storyteller: Tricksters

Review: Specter Inspectors #1

Specter Inspectors #1

I’ll just come out and admit it, I’m a fan of the various ghost hunting shows out there. I don’t take them too seriously but they deliver simple scares at times and can feature some interesting history as well. So, I was really looking forward to Specter Inspectors #1 which kicks off a new miniseries featuring the genre. And, much like its live-action cousins, the debut issue really entertains setting up what looks to be an interesting series.

Written by Bowen McCurdy and Kaitlyn Musto, Specter Inspectors #1 introduces us to a ghost hunting group that’s attempting to break through the online wall and get noticed. Their latest adventure takes them to Cape Grace a town where people disappear and there have been reports of cult activity, spiritual unrest, and shadowy figures. Standing looming is Town Hall, a building that burned a hundred years ago along with two individuals. Their hope is to film so ghosts and blow up online with a show coming out of it.

The team is full of set roles, one being the true believer another being the skeptic. They’re rounded out with the “meathead” type character and younger member. The four of them have a good dynamic as characters with clear romantic tension between a few of them. There’s hints at past experiences that add to their character depth and it all comes together for a group that could be fun to watch in real life.

But, from there, the comic takes some twists.

This isn’t a straight-up ghost hunt, this is what happens after and that’s what’s unexpected. It also builds in such a solid way that I didn’t see coming at all. While I expected a fun ghost hunting show in comic form, Specter Inspectors #1 is so much more and so much more interesting.

Bowen McCurdy does double duty also handling the art with lettering by Jim Campbell. Specter Inspectors #1 has a style and look that’s become popular with BOOM! comics such as Goldie Vance and Lumberjanes. I’m not quite sure how to describe it but it’s a look and style I enjoy. The comic doesn’t focus on scares but still evokes a spooky aura about it. And, when things do build to get to the ghost goodness it does it in a way that might scare younger readers while being a bit more humorous for adults.

Specter Inspectors #1 is a solid debut that winds up being so much more than expected. It’s a solid horror story for the younger set with just enough creepiness to entice fans of the genre or create new ones. It’s an entertaining read that has me already excited to check out more and see where it goes.

Story: Bowen McCurdy, Kaitlyn Musto Art: Bowen McCurdy Letterer: Jim Campbell
Story: 8.4 Art: 8.4 Overall: 8.4 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Get a First Look at Origins #4

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Origins #4, the latest issue in the limited series by acclaimed writer Clay McLeod Chapman, illustrator Jakub Rebelka, colorist Patricio Delpeche, and letterer Jim Campbell, that presents a stunning view of a future where humanity’s last hope may be the person who brought about its destruction, available on February 10, 2021.

When the Network discovers David and Chloe’s refuge, they’re forced to make a devastating sacrifice to escape. To continue into the desolate frozen wastelands towards David’s lab, they’ll need the help of their new-found allies if they want to survive.

ORIGINS #4

Get a First Look at Saladin Ahmed and Kivelä’s Abbott: 1973 #2

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Abbott: 1973 #2, the latest issue of the new series from Miles Morales: Spider-Man mastermind and Eisner Award-winning writer Saladin Ahmed and acclaimed artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. This new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it.

An old friend sends an ominous warning to Abbott – her enemies have returned to weaken her by any means necessary. As the personal losses mount and her efforts at the newspaper are blocked, Abbott finally catches a break – uncovering one of the most guarded secrets of the group aiming to take down the man who would be Detroit’s first Black mayor. But all victories come with a cost…and this one may just be too high for Abbott to pay!

Abbott: 1973 #2 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Mirka Andolfo, will be available for sale on February 17, 2021.

Abbott: 1973 #2

Your First Look at the Dark Fantasy Adventure The Last Witch #2

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at The Last Witch #2, the next issue of the brand new original series from writer Conor McCreery, artist V.V. Glass, colorist Natalia Nesterenko, and letterer Jim Campbell, a young adult fantasy comic book series that shows that the greatest magic of all lies inside of us, available on February 10, 2021.

Captured by the witch known as The Cailleach, Saoirse discovers the true power of her mysterious mark! But even as she attempts to save her brother Brahm with her newfound power, Saoirse must grapple with the truth about her family and their shocking connection to an enemy more dangerous than they ever imagined!

The Last Witch #2 features main cover art by series artist V.V. Glass as well as variant cover art by Jorge Corona with colors by Sarah Stern.

The Last Witch #2

Preview: Critical Hit

CRITICAL HIT

Writer: Matt Miner
Artist: Jonathan Brandon Sawyer
Colorist: Doug Garbark / Letterers: Jim Campbell & Crank!
Mature / $16.99 / 116 pages

Sarah and Jeanette love animals with a vengeance.

Under cover of darkness, they don ski-masks and wield sledgehammers, rescuing abused animals from dog-fighting rings, illegal testing labs, and other abusers.  

When they wreak havoc on a rogue gang of hunters, though, the girls find themselves in over their heads. The gang they’ve stumbled onto aren’t hunters – they’re serial killers.
And soon the liberators become the prey!

Collects issues 1-4.

CRITICAL HIT

Preview: X’ED

X’ED

written by Tony Patrick
illustrated by Ayhan Hayrula, Brian Level, Chris Peterson
colorists Doug Garbark, Dee Cunniffe
lettered by Jim Campbell
$16.99 | full color | 164 pages
MATURE

A sci-fi thriller about a next-gen form of psychiatry: ‘subliminal hitmen’ injected into your mind who hunt down the demons that haunt you. 

Ex-military sharpshooter Colin McClure is Mezign Corp’s most recent recruit for the still-experimental (and often deadly) job of subliminal hitman. McClure is the perfect candidate for two reasons: a- he’s a killing machine, and b- he lost his legs in the war, so subliminal-ops are his only way to see any action. But he’s also a dangerous candidate for one reason unknown to Mezign: Colin’s true motive is to enter the mind of his catatonic daughter and bring her out of a coma.

From writer Tony Patrick (Batman And The Signal) and artist Ayhan Hayrula.

X'ED

Review: Abbott 1973 #1

The minute I finished the first Abbott book by Saladin Ahmed and Sami Kivelä it became my go-to recommendation for people looking to get into comics. It still holds that position. A lot of it is due to how much like a contemporary comic it feels like, as if you were reading something that couldn’t have come out any other time, despite it being set in 1970’s Detroit while also borrowing ideas from the political thrillers and horror movies of that decade.

To say I was anxiously awaiting the first issue of its second arc is an understatement of the highest order. Following the investigations of journalist Elena Abbott—“a  detective for the people,” as the comic proclaims—feels like taking a journey through the underbelly of America’s unique version of systemic racism, a brutal trek through it with the intention of deconstructing all of it with dark magic thrown into the mix to further power the metaphors at play in the story.

Abbott 1973

The second arc seems to be operating on the same wavelength, with Abbott facing yet another supernatural threat fueled by racial animosity, only this time the powers of corruption are looking to dismantle the candidacy of a Detroit mayoral candidate poised to become the city’s first black person to take up the position.

Set in 1973, Ahmed and Kivelä keep the titular journalist from straying from her old-school investigative methods, echoing movies like All the President’s Men in terms of how it develops a sense of danger that bubbles up with each attempt at shedding light on the potential sabotage of the black mayoral candidate. Each new sliver of information dug up through her investigation raises the stakes not just for the story she’s working on but for her very own sense of safety.

Ahmed and Kivelä achieve this in the first book, which focuses on elected officials dabbling in dark magic to keep black communities in a constant state of chaos and instability, a tactic that allowed the ruling class to justify anti-black measures in the name of public safety (not to mention precious votes).

In Abbott 1973, the protagonist is now well aware of the dark influences that are trying to disrupt Detroit’s political structure while also being conscious of the fact magic and journalism have a complicated history with the public standard of veracity and reliability.

Abbott 1973

While these ideas are difficult to separate from the character and her story, Ahmed and Kivelä manage to complicate Abbott’s daily grind even more with an added focus on social notions of femininity in the public arena and in the professional workspace.

The comic dives into these obstacles through a new black character that comes into Abbott’s newspaper organization as its latest publisher, a man called Mr. Manning. This new figure of authority insists on keeping up appearances concocted by male-dominated notions of etiquette and behavior, instructing Abbott on how women should dress and behave in the workplace.

Given the story’s focus on change, and how the election of Detroit’s first black mayor stands as a plea for it, Abbott 1973 #1 looks to the country’s past to reflect on the current state of politics, be it racial or otherwise. Just how deep the comic will go to comment on this remains to be seen, but it’s well on its way to add something to the conversation (especially in the context of a very divided United States that’s growing further apart on a daily basis).

Kivelä’s art continues to favor that 1970’s grittiness prominent in that decade’s movies, deftly weaving realism with supernatural sights that carry a kind of violence to them on mere presence alone. Each character looks storied, the result of a long line of personal experiences that carry over into their overall looks.

Abbott 1973

Mattia Iacono’s colors complements the seventies vibe of the story beautifully with muted colors that make the darker elements jump out of the page even more when they manifest themselves. It creates a heaviness around the more horror-inclined sequences and can feel downright oppressive when Abbott as at the receiving end of them.

On the dark magic side of the story, Abbott 1973 is careful not to allow it to get lost in the social commentary that’s clearly in display in every page. Be it in hints of paranormal activity or outright terror, the hauntings Ahmed and Kivelä have cooked up for Abbott feel like an organic element of the story and they do their fair share of the worldbuilding. They are integral to the comic’s message and are smartly implemented.

Abbott 1973 #1 is a perfect continuation of Elena Abbott’s investigations into how magic has been taken over by racists bent on keeping America divided. Ahmed and Kivelä have one of the best characters in comics in their hands and they seem to be well aware of it. Abbott is the kind of creation one hopes becomes an industry staple, producing hundreds of stories for years to come.

Script: Saladin Ahmed Art: Sami Kivelä
Color: Mattia Iacono Letterer: Jim Campbell
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy and brush up on Detroit history


Purchase: comiXologyZeus Comics

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