Tag Archives: jill thompson

Preview: Scooby Apocalypse #24

Scooby Apocalypse #24

Story: Keith Giffen
Dialogue: J.M. DeMatteis
Art: Patrick Oliffe
Ink: Tom Nguyen, Andy Owens
Color: Hi-Fi
Letterer: Travis Lanham
Assistant: Liz Erickson
Cover: Jill Thompson
Variant Cover: Trevor Hairsine, Antoine Fabela
Editor: Harvey Richards
Head Editor: Jim Chadwick
In Shops: Apr 11, 2018
SRP: $3.99

It’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for: Fred and Daphne are finally together! But in a world full of murder, monsters and misery-how long can true love last?

C2E2 2018: The Action Comics #1000 Panel

At C2E2 this past weekend, I had the opportunity to attend the Action Comics #1000 panel, which had a lot of information about that specific issue as well as reveals of upcoming Superman artwork and stories, mostly involving new DC Comics writer Brian Michael Bendis. Along the way, the talented group of creators on the panel talked about their connection to Superman while teasing their stories, and some surprise swag was given out at the end…

It’s seriously insane that a monthly comic book has hit four digits in issue numbers and has basically been published since 1938. Some of DC’s best creators convened at the Action Comics #1000 panel to talk about their work on upcoming Superman titles, their relationship to the iconic hero, and most importantly, should his costume have underwear on the outside, or not? The panel included writer Brian Michael Bendis (Alias), who is making his DC Comics debut on Action Comics #1000, writer/artist Patrick Gleason (Superman), writer Tom King (Batman), artist Clay Mann (Batman), artist Jill Thompson (Beasts of Burden), and artist Philip Tan (Suicide Squad: Rebirth).

It kicked off with some information about the 80 page celebration that is Action Comics #1000 as well as a 384 page hardcover book called 80 Years of Superman with all kinds of essays, tributes, stories, and art that looked perfect for a coffee table along with an unpublished story by Jerry Siegel and artists from Joe Shuster’s studio. Continuing with the unpublished theme, Bendis reminded the moderator that Action Comics #1000 has some unpublished art by legendary Superman artist Curt Swan that Marv Wolfman scripted over and geeked out about it. He showed a real passion for being involved with Superman and DC Comics on the panel.

After saying he had almost no time off between doing his last Marvel book, Invincible Iron Man #600, and his first DC book so he could jump in on Action Comics #1000, Brian Michael Bendis set up the first reveal of the panel. It was four pages of lettered Jim Lee art as well as his and Bendis’ first original DC creation, the mysterious villain Rogol Zaar. (There was a snarky joke about red trunks in there too.) Bendis said that the villain will be connected to a secret from Superman’s past. The secret will be revealed in Action Comics #1000 and then expanded upon in the weekly Man of Steel miniseries. He then told Rogol’s secret origin, which was connected to his hospitalization for a MRSA infection in late 2017. Dr. Rogol was a no-nonsense doctor in the hospital, who helped him get better so he decided to name his first big DC villain after her. When Bendis told Dr. Rogel this, she nodded like he was crazy. The next day, she had Googled him and brought out an old Marc Silvestri drawing and said she should look like a bloodstained, bikini wearing barbarian woman. It’s safe to say she wasn’t impressed with Jim Lee’s final design. In his first DC story, Bendis made sure to “write big” for Jim Lee and was influenced by some of his collaborations with Geoff Johns and Scott Snyder on Justice League and Superman Unchained respectively in the salad days of the New 52.

The topic turned to May 2’s DC Nation #0, which is coming out the same week as Free Comic Book Day, but is on sale for $0.25 so the comic could feature more story pages. The book has previews of Tom King’s upcoming work on Batman and Scott Snyder’s upcoming work on No Justice as well as a brand new Superman story by Bendis and Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez. Working with the 70 year old Garcia-Lopez was on Bendis’ bucket list, and he came out of retirement to deliver some beautiful pages featuring group shots of the Daily Planet bullpen reacting to Superman. Also, apparently he’s a super nice guy and still lives for collaborating on comic book stories.

About a month after DC Nation, The Man of Steel #1 will be released with Brian Michael Bendis writing and Ivan Reis and Joe Prado on artwork. In each issue of this weekly miniseries, Bendis is collaborating with a new artist he’s never worked with before except Kevin Maguire and diving feet first into the DC Universe. Bendis talked about how he wanted to make Metropolis a lived-in setting where each nook and cranny has its own story much like Gotham and also how he wants to show why Clark Kent became a reporter to “tell the truth Superman can’t”. He pointed out that unlike his powers and coming to Earth as an infant, becoming a reporter was his choice. Plus there’s going to be a big space conspiracy story featuring various alien races, including the Guardians of the Universe, and its logo was based off of John Byrne’s Man of Steel even if the stories aren’t really similar.

The Man of Steel leads into Action Comics #1001, which will be written by Bendis and drawn by Patrick Gleason, who previously was the co-writer with Peter Tomasi and occasional artist on Superman. Gleason says that Action #1000 is the celebration/jam issue while the real story starts in issue 1001. He talks about how Superman is an all-out superhero book while Action Comics will focus on the Clark/Superman dichotomy and also build up Metropolis and the Daily Planet. He then proved that he is one of the harder working creators in comics and said that he had to draw 15 pages of Action Comics #1000 while also doing full interiors on Superman #45, his farewell to the title. Luckily, all 15 pages of his Action Comics #1000 story “The Neverending Battle” were splashes and was a love letter to Superman stories across time. One of them featured the old Superman “S”, which his six year old son said was incorrect. His son ended up appearing on a page where Superman stops a train, and all four of his kids helped ink a page with Superman fighting Nazis in World War II with Sgt. Rock.

The moderator turned the focus to Tom King and Clay Mann’s five page Action Comics #1000 story, which is already available online. It is set way in the future, fairly depressing, and King began with a little joke about how Batman was better than Superman. King said that he when was he younger that he thought Superman was a fairly “generic” hero. However, through his grandmother, who is from Nebraska and his wife, who is from Chicago, he began to see him as an embodiment of Midwestern values aka focusing on the solution, not just the problem. Then, artist Clay Mann got a nice ovation from the audience for his art skills and talked about King giving him reference material of Mars to draw this future Earth. He also joked about Superman’s tears not evaporating in the sun, which severely hurt Tom King’s “scientific” credentials. King’s explanation was “super tears”, which led to Bendis telling a story about how he wrote an angry letter to John Byrne while he was a comic book store clerk about how Superman shaves with a mirror and heat vision and ended up getting roasted by Byrne in the letters page of Next Men #8. The ghost of John Byrne definitely seemed to be haunting this panel.

Next, Jill Thompson teased some of her art for the upcoming Action Comics Special story with Mark Russellwhich is about Clark Kent roasting Lex Luthor at the White House Correspondents Dinner. It looks super hilarious, and various members of the Justice League are there in dressier versions of their costumes. The wrestler Alex Chamberlain posed for her art. Then, the moderator asked her and the panel who their favorite Superman artists were. Thompson said she liked Steve Rude, especially his work with Dave Gibbon on World’s Finest, where he gave Metropolis and Gotham two distinct looks. Philip Tan’s definitive artist was Alex Ross on Kingdom Come and Mann’s were the aforementioned Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Jim Lee, Dan Jurgens, and John Byrne. King picked Byrne and Curt Swan because “Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow” is his favorite Superman story. Patrick Gleason said he liked the Superfriends and Bruce Timm Superman cartoons before getting into comics, but his favorite artists were Jurgens and Ross. Bendis closed by giving a shout out to the jam issue (He loves those.) Action Comics #400, which featured Steve Ditko, Jim Steranko, Moebius, and more’s take on Superman. And they all commiserated over the difficulty of drawing the Superman “S”.

Towards the end of the panel, Brian Michael Bendis talked about how what a solid foundation Dan Jurgens, Peter Tomasi, and Patrick Gleason left him on the Superman titles as they went from having two Supermen to just one hopeful, optimistic Superman even with some super crazy stories like the Boyzarro and Rozarro starring Superman #45, which is basically a Bizarro-verse version of the DC Rebirth one-shot. Bendis says the ideal is taking over a struggling book, like Frank Miller on Daredevil, because you have creative freedom, but it’s a tougher challenge to take over a book that has hit a creative peak like Superman.

Bendis said that his take on Superman wouldn’t be a reboot and that he had a seven page manifesto of Superman is relatable to him, especially as a father. (Of course, King quipped about Batman being more relatable.) Plus there is a lot of adoption in his family. He retold a story where as a struggling artist in Cleveland, he took on a gig to do art for a Superman parade where he was paid for Superman merchandise. Siegel and Shuster cancelled so Stan Lee of all people was the guest of honor and called him by name, but it was really because he was wearing a nametag. However, this parade gave him to the opportunity to talk with many comic creators about his career, including George Perez, who gave him 20 minutes of solid advice, including to focus on one project at a time, which has helped him with all those crazy deadlines and juggling multiple books.

The panel concluded with a roundtable discussion about the return of Superman’s red trunks, and Gleason talking about how he and Jim Lee basically designed around them when they were coming up with Superman’s new costume for DC Rebirth. But the panel seemed pretty pro-trunks, and each member of the panel audience was rewarded with their own pair of Superman trunks (Mostly XL.) with #TheTrunksAreBack embroidered on the back.

Basically, Action Comics #1000 seems like it’s going to be historic and epic, and you should pick it up when it drops on April 18.

Preview: Scooby Apocalypse #23

Scooby Apocalypse #23

Story: Keith Giffen, J.M. DeMatteis, Rob Wagner
Art: Ron Wagner
Cover: Jill Thompson
Ink: Andy Owens, Color: Hi-Fi Letterer: Travis Lanham
Editor: Harvey Richards Assistant Editor: Liz Erickson
In Shops: Mar 14, 2018
SRP: $3.99

With their new base of operations established, the gang begins the search for the last remnants of the human race! In their quest to find survivors, they encounter creatures who aren’t mindless savages-and the discovery just might tear the team apart! Also: the next chapter in the outrageous adventures of Secret Squirrel!

Preview: Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: Coronation #1 (of 12)

Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: Coronation #1 (of 12)

Publisher: Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Simon Spurrier
Artist: Daniel Bayliss
Colorist: Dan Jackson
Letterer: Jim Campbell
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Fiona Staples
Subscription Cover: Rebekah Isaacs
Film Variant Cover: Laurent Durieux
Toby Variant Cover: Jill Thompson
Incentive Cover: Bill Sienkiewicz
Price: $3.99

Simon Spurrier (Godshaper, The Power of the Dark Crystal) and Daniel Bayliss (Jim Henson’s Storyteller: Dragons, Kennel Block Blues) present

Before Sarah braved the Labyrinth to save her brother, another young woman sought to save a young boy named Jareth from the clutches of the Goblins.

Set in 18th-century Venice, Italy, Jim Henson’s Labyrinth is a striking look into the history of the Labyrinth itself, and what happens to the little boys who don’t get rescued.
This is the untold history of the Goblin King.

Superman Gets Oversized 48-Page One-Shots in May

The creative talent of Action Comics writer Dan Jurgens and the Superman team of Patrick Gleason and Peter J. Tomasi have brought legions of Superman fans story after story filled with action, humor, emotion and candor–traits that have continued to present Superman as an enduring symbol of hope, optimism, truth and justice. This May, the conclusions to their epic runs serve as the centerpieces of two special one-shot issues.

On sale May 2, the 48-page Action Comics Special #1 features “The Last Will and Testament of Lex Luthor,” written by Jurgens with art by Will Conrad. Beginning with the events of Rebirth, Superman’s greatest enemy became his most unexpected ally. Is Lex finally on the heroic path, or is he still hiding his true colors? When he finds himself in an adventure where Superman could be destroyed, what will he do? Save the Man of Steel, or witness his demise at the hands of an unimaginable enemy? This oversize special also includes stories from Max Landis and Francis Manapul originally slated to appear in the DC Universe Holiday Special 2017 #1, and Mark Russell with artist Jill Thompson.

Available May 16, Superman Special #1 features Tomasi and Gleason’s “The Promise,” concluding a story from Rebirth that began in issue #8, 2016’s “Escape from Dinosaur Island.” Before Superman’s world goes through some drastic changes, he has unfinished business to attend to on Dinosaur Island. Superman and the Losers’ Captain Storm take one final trip together into the abyss of tomorrow, which brings the military man out of time into the world of today. This 48-page extra-size special also features bonus stories by Mark Russell with art by Bryan Hitch and Ian Flynn with art by Kaare Andrews.

Beast of Burden: Animal Rites is Out this May in Paperback

Fresh off a double Eisner-Award win at San Diego Comic-Con 2017, Dark Horse will offer the first volume of the award-winning series Beast of Burden that effortlessly combines fantasy and humor to bring us the adventures of paranormal pets investigating the horrors of their suburban community in a trade paperback.

Award-winning comics creators Evan Dorkin and Jill Thompson come together to share the lives of some unlikely heroes. Black magic, demonic frogs, and zombie roadkill are just a few of the problems plaguing the seemingly sleepy little town of Burden Hill. Beneath the quiet streets, a rat cabal plots vengeance, while in the local cemetery the dead leave their graves. With the human residents unaware of the supernatural danger, it’s up to a determined crew of dogs (and one cat) to keep their community safe. Lives will be lost, and bonds forged as the beasts of Burden Hill battle against an unknown evil rooted within their town.

This volume reprints the comic-book series Beasts of Burden issues #1–4, the short stories from the Dark Horse Book of Hauntings, the Dark Horse Book of Witchcraft, the Dark Horse Book of the Dead, and the Dark Horse Book of Monsters,  “Stray,” “Unfamiliar,” “Let Sleeping Dogs Lie,” and “A Dog and His Boy,” published by Dark Horse Comics.

Beast of Burden: Animal Rites TPB goes on sale May 9, 2018 and retails for $19.99.

BOOM! Studios Announces an Ongoing Jim Henson’s Labyrinth Comic Series

Announced today, BOOM! Studios‘ imprint Archaia will be launching a new ongoing comic series for Jim Henson’s Labyrinth. Launching in February 2018, Jim Henson’s Labyrinth #1 is written by Simon Spurrier with art by Daniel Bayliss. The first issue includes a main cover by Fiona Staples, subscription cover by Rebekah Isaacs, and three variant covers by Laurent Durieux, Jill Thompson, and Bill Sienkiewicz.

This coming February get a magical look into the world of Jim Henson’s Labyrinth. Before Sarah braved the Labyrinth to save her brother, another young woman sought to save a young boy named Jareth from the clutches of the Goblins.

Set in 18th-century Venice, Italy, Jim Henson’s Labyrinth is a striking look into the history of the Labyrinth itself, and what happens to the little boys who don’t get rescued.

This is the untold history of the Goblin King.

The Mighty Thor #700 Sets the Stage for the Asgardian’s Future

The Mighty Thor #700 raised the Mighty Asgardian to a new level of storytelling in an epic tale from writer Jason Aaron and a host of incredible artists such as Russell Dauterman, Walter Simonson, James Harren, Becky Cloonan, Das Pastoras, Chris Burnham, Andrew MacLean, Jill Thompson, Mike del Mundo, Olivier Coipel, Daniel Acuna, and Matthew Wilson. And in the spirit of Marvel Legacy, this is just the beginning of a story that will affect not just Thor, but the Marvel Universe at large.

The “Death of the Mighty Thor” storyline has only just begun but its already resulted in Mangog killing Thor’s goat Toothgnasher and Malekith’s dark army killed Karnilla, Queen of the Norns. But, with Karnilla’s death we see where the threads of fate are leading in a double page spread that is gorgeous. There, fans have gotten teasers for upcoming stories that will play out in the pages of The Mighty Thor and some elsewhere. If you want to know what 2018 holds for Thor, this image has a lot of hints.

The perfect jumping-on point for all fans, The Mighty Thor #700 is in comic shops now. Don’t miss your chance to get in on the action! And look for The Mighty Thor #701 coming to comic shops in November from Jason Aaron and artists James Harren and Dave Stewart.

Preview: Harley Quinn #27

Harley Quinn #27

(W) Amanda Conner, Frank Tieri (A) Eleonora Carlini (CA) Jill Thompson
In Shops: Sep 06, 2017
SRP: $2.99

Harley and the Penguin struck an uneasy truce the first time he started extending his criminal empire into New York City… but now he’s plotting a massive real estate deal right in Harley’s Coney Island — including coming after her own building!

Preview: The Flintstones #11

The Flintstones #11

(W) Mark Russell (A) Steve Pugh (CA) Jill Thompson
RATED T
In Shops: May 03, 2017
SRP: $3.99

There goes the neighborhood! After Fred’s birthday gift from Barney leads to outrage on their street, he is called to appear before the menacing neighborhood association. Can Fred reason with them? Or will the Flintstones be run out of Bedrock?

« Older Entries