Tag Archives: javier garron

It’s a Girl! Meet Miles Morales’ New Baby Sister!

As if Spider-Man doesn’t have enough on his plate, he will now have to take on all the responsibilities and adventures that come with being a big brother! In today’s landmark issue of Miles Morales: Spider-Man, Miles welcomed his new baby sister, Billie Mariana Morales, giving the young hero yet another reason to protect the world as Spider-Man!

MILES MORALES: SPIDER-MAN #13

Written by SALADIN AHMED
Art by JAVIER GARRÓN, KEVIN LIBRANDA, and ALITHA E. MARTINEZ
Colors by DAVID CURIEL and PROTOBUNKER

Billie Mariana Morales

Review: Spider-Geddon

Spider-Verse united them and Spider-Geddon threatens to destroy them. The Inheritors have escaped their prison and want their revenge.

Spider-Geddon collects Spider-Geddon #0-5 and Vault of Spiders #1-2 by Christos Gage, Clayton Crain, Jed MacKay, Javier Garron, Israel Silva, Travis Lanham, Dan Slot, Jorge Molina, Carlo Barberi, Todd Nauck, Stefano Caselli, Joey Vazquez, Jay Leisten, Craig Yeung, Roberto Poggi, Jose Marzan, Jr., and David Curiel.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores on February 26! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Miles Morales: Spider-Man #2

Miles is getting closer to solving the mystery of the thievery ring plaguing Brooklyn, but the Rhino has complicated matters quite a lot. Rhino doesn’t usually have minions preferring to charge alone. What’s behind this change of methodology? Plus, meet a new antagonist who may just become Miles’ most dangerous foe!

Okay, permit me to give you a bit of context regarding where my head was at when opening this comic. I’d not had the best of days. To put it mildly (professionally – thankfully all my loved ones are okay). It was the kind of day where the absolute last thing I wanted to do was come home and write about comics. The last thing. Then I read this comic, and for ten minutes I lost myself; because of Miles Morales, I forgot what was bothering me. Because of the Rhino, my shoulders felt a lot lighter.

And suddenly, I wanted to write about comics. Specifically, Miles Morales: Spider-Man #2. Now I understand that not everybody will be in the same place as me when reading this comic, and I know that technically I should remain objective and logically look at the merits of this book, but that’s not going to happen. Whenever one reads a book or comic, listens to music or watches a movie then then one will have, on some scale, an emotional reaction. And I had one with this comic; I had fun while reading it. For the fifteen minutes it took me to read this, I had forgotten my troubles and I didn’t care about tomorrow. I was happy and lost within the pages of a comic book.

At this point, you’re probably wondering when I’ll start talking about the book itself. I appreciate your patience, dear reader, and will let you know that while the first issue was fun, this was amazing. Sensational, even. The first issue found Spider-Man battling the Rhino over a misunderstanding (and without giving too much away, it’s a pretty hilarious issue), but this issue took everything that worked and runs with it. Saladin Ahmed has such a wonderful grasp of the characters within this book that each page’s dialogue a vibrantly natural feeling. The pacing is spot on; relentless, exhausting. A day in the life of Miles Morales is not for the faint of heart. Although it makes an awesome comic.

But as good as the writing is, Javier Garron and David Curiel match every beat. Garron’s layouts, choreography and kinetic figures carry remarkable weight on the page (especially Rhino). Curiel adds the cherry on top of a pretty fantastic pie with his colouring. Artistically the book is solid. Very, very solid.

Objectively, this may not be the best Spider-Man comic you’ll ever read, but it was exactly the comic I needed to read today. It doesn’t hurt that it’s also very good, but the impact for me was immeasurable. Sometimes the right comic (or song or whatever) can lift you, and Miles Morales: Spider-Man #2 has done that for me. So thank you, Saladin Ahmed. Thank you Javier Garron. Thank you David Curiel. Thank you for being the bright spot in a day that was, up until the opening of this comic, pretty shitty.

Story: Saladin Ahmed Art: Javier Garron Colours: David Curiel
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Miles Morales: Spider-Man #1

Miles Morales is back in his own series just in time for Into the Spider-Verse. How does a new creative team of writer Saladin Ahmed, artist Javier Garron, colorist David Curiel, and letterer Cory Petit stack up?

I review and show off the new Miles Morales: Spider-Man #1 from Marvel, check it out!

Review: Miles Morales: Spider-Man #1

Miles Morales is back in his own series, Miles Morales: Spider-Man, just in time for Into the Spider-Verse. How does a new creative team of writer Saladin Ahmed, artist Javier Garrón, colorist David Curiel, and letterer Cory Petit stack up? Watch the video and find out!

Get your copy in comic shops December 12! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Ant-Man and the Wasp: Lost and Found

After an accident, Ant-Man and the Wasp are trapped in the microverse, Ant-Man and the Wasp: Lost and Found is a standalone adventure from Mark Waid, Javier Garron, and Israel Silva that collects all five issues.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores on November 20. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Mile Morales Returns to Swing Into His Own Solo Series this December

This December, Miles Morales returns in his own solo series written by Saladin Ahmed with art by Javier Garron and a first issue cover by Brian Stelfreeze which you can see below.

Spider-Man #1 arrives December 12, which we expected with Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse coming to theaters December 14. It’s the perfect combination of comic on the shelf timed with a movie release.

In Ahmed’s take, Miles is focus on protecting his community and city instead of universe shattering events. There’s also school, family, bullies, and attempting to have a social life. The first arc will pit him against Rhino and guest-star an unexpected character, a “big hero.”

This is the first series to feature the character that doesn’t feature Brian Michael Bendis writing (the character was co-created by Bendis with Sara Pichelli).

Preview: Amazing Spider-Man #798

Amazing Spider-Man #798

Story: Dan Slott
Art: Stuart Immonen
Ink: Wade von Grawbadger
Color: Marte Garcia
Letterer: VC’s Joe Caramagna
Cover: Alex Ross
Young Guns Variant: Javier Garrón, Romulo Fajardo, Jr.
Connecting Variant: Humberto Ramos, Edgar Delgado
Venom 30th Anniversary Variant: Terry Dodson, Rachel Dodson
Editor: Nick Lowe
Associate Editor: Devin Lewis
Assistant Editor: Tom Groneman
Rated T
In Shops: Apr 04, 2018
SRP: $3.99

GO DOWN SWINGING Part 2
• Dan Slott’s final SPIDER-MAN story continues!
• The GREEN GOBLIN HAS RETURNED – and he’s exacting his ultimate revenge not only on SPIDER-MAN, but on everyone the wall-crawler loves!
• Norman Osborn’s offering NO QUARTER, an ultimatum that threatens to finish PETER PARKER once and for all!

Marvel Unveils More Marvel Legacy

This fall, a new day will shine on the Marvel Universe with your favorite heroes, your favorite creators…where every story is an event!

Marvel as revealed the following creative teams and Legacy titles:

OLD MAN LOGAN #31
Written by ED BRISSON
Art by MIKE DEODATO

 

DARKHAWK: LEGACY #51
Written by CHAD BOWERS and CHRISTOPHER SIMS
Art by KEV WALKER

 

SHE-HULK #159
Written by MARIKO TAMAKI
Art by JAHNOY LINDSAY

 

SECRET WARRIORS #8
Written by MATTHEW ROSENBERG
Art by JAVIER GARRON

C2E2 2017: Secret Empire is Footloose and Context Free

 

Thanks to the clutchness of my former podcast co-host and current Comicosity writer, Terrence Sage, I got a front row seat to the Secret Empire panel at C2E2 on Saturday where editors Christina Harrington, Nick Lowe, and Wil Moss discussed Marvel‘s summer event with writers Nick Spencer and Margaret Stohl in addition to PR guy, Chris D’Lando. The panel solidified my idea that Secret Empire is a series that will be filled with twists, turns, and various summer blockbuster flourishes, but is unaware of the context or larger world around. Throughout the panel, Spencer stressed the fact that Secret Empire is apolitical even though it is clearly about the secret rise of fascism in the Marvel Universe with references to the Axis Powers starting on page one of issue zero. This is pretty painful because both Captain America’s co-creator Jack Kirby fought in World War II and the cover of Captain America Comics #1 famously featured Cap punching Adolf Hitler although the United States was still neutral.

But the panel wasn’t all negatives. Thanks to Steve McNiven and Andrea SorrentinoSecret Empire is going to have some glorious artwork. On the tie-in front, there was talk about the rise of the Blue team of X-Men and Matthew Rosenberg and Javier Garron’s Secret Warriors as the de facto antifa resistance. Mighty Captain Marvel writer Margaret Stohl was the hero of the panel as she redeems Carol Danvers from being an authoritarian herself in Civil War Ii and back to being one of the Marvel Universe’s greatest soldiers in the upcoming “Band of Sisters” storyline. In keeping with its name, this storyline was inspired by watching documentary footage of World War II, including the Battle of Midway and the D-Day landing.

Andrea Sorrentino art from Secret Empire #3.

The panel kicked off with Chris D’Lando and Nick Spencer doing a two man PR spiel for Secret Empire and its core tie-ins, Captain America Sam Wilson and Captain America Steve Rogers. Spencer stressed that this story was his own idea that he came up with in early 2015. Secret Empire didn’t come out of Marvel editorial retreat, and Spencer pitched it personally to Tom Brevoort. I can definitely respect Secret Empire coming organically from Nick Spencer’s work on the Captain America titles and Avengers: Standoff. However, he use our favorite magical MacGuffin, the Cosmic Cube quite a lot. This reality warping thingamabob could offer an instant reset with its cosmic abilities although Spencer stressed to fans that he wouldn’t “walk back” anything in this storyline.

Divorced from any kind of historical or sociopolitical context, Secret Empire has some cool things going for it with a two front war with Captain Marvel, Alpha Flight, and the Guardians of the Galaxy taking on the Chitauri,  heroes like the Defenders, Dr. Strange, and Cloak and Dagger, battling in the Dark Dimension, and the rest of the heroes fighting HYDRA in Washington DC. Secret Empire #2 will contain the reveal that Steve Rogers is evil in the form of a beautiful mosaic double page spread from Andrea Sorrentino while issue 3 will take place in space. It’s the big heroes vs villain event that many fans have been looking for, but the biggest villain of them all happens to be the former moral center of the Marvel Universe. Oh, and there’s going to be mini Cosmic Cubes to promote the event that look kind of cute and are better than comic book store employees dressing up like mythological creature themed Nazis.

Spencer, D’Lando, and Marvel executive editor Nick Lowe teased some of the tie-ins too. Captain America Steve

Captain America Steve Rogers #18 Cover

Rogers will focus on Cap as basically dictator of the United States and feature guest appearances from the journalists of Civil War: Frontline and Namor. Two of those three things are excellent, and the friendship between Namor and Steve as members of the Invaders in World War II has always fascinated me. Doctor Strange #21 marks the debut of a new creative team of Dennis Hopeless and Nico Henrichon, artist of Pride of Baghdad as well as lots of monsters in the Dark Dimension. I haven’t followed the new Doctor Strange series, but the combination of excellent art and guest appearances by cast members from the late, great Spider-Woman means I’ll give the new run a shot.

Lowe also mentioned Amazing Spider-Man #29, which stars the Superior Octopus, or Dr. Octopus in a new body working for HYDRA. It looked like Richard Spencer’s ultimate wet dream as drawn by the talented Stuart Immonen. There will also be an anthology series called Secret Empire: Brave New World starring obscure, yet insanely awesome Marvel characters, like Blade, Domino, and of course, Bob, Agent of HYDRA from Deadpool. Some highlights of Brave New World‘s creative team included Ethan Sacks (Formerly of the New York Daily News) writing a story from the POV of the Daily Bugle and Kim and Kim creator Magdalene Visaggio doing a Starbrand one.

Editor Christina Harrington cheered up some of the X-Men fans in the room by teasing X-Men Blue #7 and the first look at #8 and #9, which will focus on the return of Emma Frost and Polaris. In the Q and A, she said that Emma will be “back in white” and hinted at her having her diamond form too and also hinted at other guest stars in the run. Nothing was mentioned about Holocaust survivor Magneto’s role in the fight against HYDRA, and hopefully as the secret team leader of the X-Men’s Blue team, he will be beating them up with magnetic things.

Wil Moss followed up with Secret Warriors #1, which will be written by Matthew Rosenberg, drawn by Javier Garron, and have one of the most stacked non-Avengers/X-Men team lineups, including Quake, Ms. Marvel, Moon Girl, Devil Dinosaur, Karnak, and Inferno. It has a fun, yet highly problematic premise of the Secret Warriors traveling across the US and liberating Inhumans from internment camps that are scarily like the ones in Chechnya for gay men. (I discuss this troubling fact with Matthew Rosenberg in an upcoming interview.)  Rosenberg has shown a knack for comedy with Rocket Raccoon and We Can Never Go Home was a great road trip story so I have high hopes for this series, which could make fetch, er, Inhumans happen. Also, the X-Men are popping up in Secret Warriors #3

The highlight of the Secret Empire panel was Margaret Stohl’s enthusiasm for Captain Marvel, and hopefully she has a long run with the character like Kelly Sue DeConnick. Stohl that the upcoming arc of Mighty Captain Marvel would get back to what Carol does best “kick ass in space” and set her up as the ultimate soldier of the Marvel Universe like Steve Rogers used to be. But the book won’t just be rah rah and punching as she will also focus on young people’s first experience in combat through the Alpha Flight cadets, including the Wakandan Aki and Dante, who appeared in the YA novel Black Widow: Forever Red that Stohl also wrote. Margaret Stohl’s take on Secret Empire seems more grounded than Nick Spencer’s with her focus on things like the horrors of war and resisting authoritarianism instead of sensationalism and retconning iconic characters.

Usually, the Q&A sessions of most panels are filled with stuttering and long self-serving fan monologues, but the one for the Secret Empire was quite amusing. I did a Storify of my live tweets of it here, but some of the highlights were Nick Spencer’s edgy love Carol Danvers’ idea for a surveillance state, saying that tearing down an iconic character is a “redemption story” and a kid (Possibly a Marvel plant) ripping off a Superman t-shirt so he could read an early copy of Secret Empire #1.

On a more serious note, I was kind of saddened when a veteran told Spencer and the panel that Secret Empire had angered some veterans who look up to Captain America and his service as a soldier. Let’s just say there was much back pedaling involved in Spencer’s response to her showing that Spencer uses the trappings of fascism in his loud, quippy action driven stories like Michael Bay uses American nationalism in his. At least, Spencer has jokes as evidenced by Superior Foes, The Fix, and the Guardians of the Galaxy’s dialogue in Secret Empire #0.

My main takeaways from Secret Empire is that it has some exciting elements, including mass superhero battles, Carol Danvers being a hero again, and Andrea Sorrentino artwork, but it seems divorced from any kind of nuance and real-world relevance. This is troubling when the bad guys are Neo-Nazis and not just “for the evulz” supervillains. But Mighty Captain Marvel, Secret Warriors, and Secret Empire: Brave New World should be fun reads.

(Plot twist: I hadn’t even read Secret Empire #0 when I attended this panel…)

Physical proof that I was at this panel, and this isn’t fake news.

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