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Are you on The Naughty List? Find out in April

THE NAUGHTY LIST #1

Writer: Nick Santora 
Artist: Lee Ferguson 
Colorist: Pippa Bowland 
Letterer:  Simon Bowland 
Cover: Francesco Francavilla 
Incentive: Lee Ferguson
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / 4.27.2022

I had a family once. A wife who loved me…a child we loved together. That’s all gone now, been gone for hundreds of years. All because of that damn star. My name? It depends on where you live. Some call me Kris Kringle, others Papa Noël, but my real name is Nicholas Sinterklass, and this is the story of what happens when you steal my Naughty List.  

Up on the housetop CLICK, CLICK, CLICK! Down through the chimney with old Saint Nick! 

From the mind of Nick Santora (Jack ReacherThe Sopranos, Law & Order, The Fugitive and Prison Break) and illustrated by Lee Ferguson (SYMPATHY FOR NO DEVILS, Sam and his Talking Gun) comes the Santa Claus origin story we’re sure you’ve never heard before.

The Naughty List #1

Preview: James Bond: Himeros #4

James Bond: Himeros #4

writer: Rodney Barnes
artist: Antonio Fuso
covers: Francesco Francavilla (A), Butch Guice (B), Francesco Francavilla (C-RI/BW)
FC | 32 pages | Spy/Fiction, Action/Adventure | $3.99 | Teen+

James Bond has survived a series of deadly assaults as he and Sarah Richmond make it to Wilhelm’s island. Amidst the traumatic memories the island unleashes, will they find what they’re looking for or does death continue to await them at every turn?

Featuring two amazing covers: Francesco Francavilla and the legendary Butch Guice!

Did you know: Ian Fleming wrote the story Chitty Chitty Bang Bang to entertain his son Caspar.

James Bond: Himeros #4

Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2021

Even though it was a shitty year overall, I found some great comics to enjoy in 2021, both old and new. Beginning with its “Future State” event, DC easily shot up to become my favorite mainstream publisher thanks to its renewed focus on different visual styles instead of a Jim Lee-esque art style and its emphasis on LGBTQ+ characters even after Pride Month. Vault and Image continued to be the homes of both my favorite creators and SF stories, and AWA, Dark Horse and even Black Mask and Archie had titles that surprised me even if they didn’t make the cut on this list. Finally, continuing a trend that I jumped on in 2020, I continued to read or revisit classic comics (Both old and new) in 2021, like Copra, Invincible, The Umbrella Academy, Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Wonder Woman: True Amazon, The Invisibles, Peter Milligan and Mike Allred’s X-Force, Hawkeye, and Black Bolt among others.

So, without further ado, here are my ten favorite comics of 2021

10. Alice in Leatherland (Black Mask)

Alice in Leatherland is a wholesome, sexy, and hyper-stylized slice of life romance comic from the creative team of Iolanda Zanfardino and Elisa Romboli. The book is about Alice, a children’s book writer, who leaves her small town for San Francisco when her girlfriend cheats on her and captures the fear and adrenaline of taking a big step in your life. The series explores sex and love through an expansive cast of LGBTQ+ characters that I wanted to spend more than five issues with. Romboli uses fairy tale style visuals as a metaphor to examine Alice’s feelings and self-growth throughout the series, and she excels at depicting both the hilarious and erotic. Alice in Leatherland is an emotional, funny read with well-developed queer characters and made me immediately add Zanfardino and Elisa Romboli to the list of creators I’ll read anything by.

9. The Autumnal (Vault)

The Autumnal by Daniel Kraus, Chris Shehan, and Jason Wordie was the most unsettling comic I read in 2021. The book follows Kat Somerville and her daughter Sybil as they leave Chicago for the town of Comfort Notch, New Hampshire. However, this town isn’t a rural oasis, but incredibly creepy. Kraus’ script unravels the foundation of blood that the town is built on while Shehan and Wordie create tension with the fall of the leaf or a crackle of a branch. I also love how fleshed out Kat is as she deals with being an outsider in what turns out to be an unfriendly space with her parenting style and approach to life being critiqued by her neighbors. Finally, The Autumnal is the finest of slow burns beginning with NIMBY/Karen-like behavior and then going full-on death cult. It’s a must read for anyone who has lived or experienced a place where time seems to stand still, or who thinks a NextDoor app post could be the basis of a good horror story.

8. The Joker (DC)

Contrary to its title, James Tynion, Guillem March, Steffano Rafaele, Arif Prianto, and others’ The Joker isn’t a comic looking at the Clown Prince of Crime’s inner psyche, but is a globe-trotting P.I. type story featuring Jim Gordon trying to capture the Joker for some folks that looks shadier and shadier as the story progresses. Tynion and (predominantly) March show the effect Joker has had on Gordon’s life and his family while also showing him discover himself outside the bounds of Gotham and its police department. As the series progresses, The Joker shows the impact that Batman and his rogue’s gallery have had on the rest of the world, and the ways governments, intelligence agencies, and more nefarious organizations deal with threats of their ilk. Along with a crime novel set in present time, James Tynion, Matthew Rosenberg, and the virtuosic Francesco Francavilla created several flashback comics showing the development of Jim Gordon’s relationship with the Joker over the years, and how it effected his family life and career almost acting as a “Year One” for Gordon as Francavilla’s art style shifts based on the era the story is set in. Plus most issues of Joker feature colorful backup stories with Harper Row trying to bring Joker’s newest ally Punchline to justice in and out of prison from Tynion, Sam Johns, Sweeney Boo, Rosi Kampe, and others.

7. Kane and Able (Image)

Kane and Able is a dual-cartoonist anthology featuring work by British cartoonists Shaky Kane and Krent Able. Kane’s stories flow together in a Jack Kirby-meets-David Lynch kind of way blurring the lines between fiction and metafiction, reality and unreality while also acting as an opportunity for him to draw cool things like dinosaurs, space women, aliens, the King of Comics, and even himself. Able’s stories have more of a grindhouse, body horror quality to him as a chainsaw-wielding Bear Fur battles a boom box wielding cockroach woman, who flesh bonds everyone in a listless, major city. Both creators have delightful, distinctive styles and put their own spin on genres like sci-fi, exploitation, and superhero. Kane and Able is free-flowing, clever, and most of all, fun and is tailor made for the larger page format of treasury editions.

6. Static Season One (DC/Milestone)

As far as pure visuals go, Static Season One by Vita Ayala, Nikolas Draper-Ivey, and ChrisCross was easily one of the best looking books on the stands in 2021. This was in addition to reinventing the iconic Black superhero through the lens of contemporary social movements, like Black Lives Matter and protests against police brutality in summer of 2020. Static Season One doesn’t merely pay homage to the classic Milestone series, but brings it into 2021 with fight sequences straight out of the best shonen manga and a three dimensional supporting cast that holistically explore the Black experience in the United States while also being a coming of age and superhero origin tale. Draper-Ivey’s character designs are sleek as hell, and his high energy approach to color palette adds intensity to fight and chase scenes. I’m excited to see what the talented creative duo of Ayala and Nikolas Draper-Ivey bring to Static’s journey as Season One wraps up and Season Two (hopefully) begins in 2022.

5. Renegade Rule (Dark Horse)

Renegade Rule is an original graphic novel from Ben Kahn, Rachel Silverstein, and Sam Beck that is a perfect fusion of a sports manga and a queer romance story set in the world of competitive video games. Even if you’re like me and have only attempted to play Overwatch a single time, Renegade Rule and its world are quite accessible via things like hypercompetitiveness, sexual tension, and breathtaking fight choreography. The in-game sequences are almost like musical numbers and use shooting, sniping, and various acrobatics to make characters’ unspoken thoughts real. Renegade Rule is like if your favorite sports movie and romantic comedy had a gay baby who loved kicking ass at video games, and I pumped my fist every time the Manhattan Mist overcame adversity or overwhelming odds and smiled when certain characters ended up with each other…

4. Echolands (Image)

After a four year absence from interior art, co-writer/artist J.H. Williams III didn’t mess around with Echolands, a love letter to both genre fiction and double page spreads. Done in collaboration with co-writer Haden Blackman and colorist Dave Stewart, Echolands is an epic fantasy quest loaded up with all kinds of genres and art styles leaking off the page and was one of the most immersive comics I read in 2021. It has a sprawling cast and world, but Blackman and Williams know when to slow down and dig into Hope Redhood and her allies and antagonists’ motivations and when to drop in a multi-page underwater or underground chase sequence. With its unique landscape layouts and all the details in J.H. Williams and Stewart’s visuals, Echolands is definitely a book worth picking up in physical format and has backmatter that both humorously and seriously adds to the worldbuilding.

3. DC Pride (DC)

In honor of Pride Month, DC Comics put some of its most talented LGBTQ+ creators on its most iconic LGBTQ+ characters in a super-sized celebration of overcoming adversity, being yourself, and loving whoever you want to love. DC Pride covered a spectrum of sexual and gender identities from a fast-paced date night story featuring the non-binary Flash, Jess Chambers, to James Tynion and Trung Le Nguyen’s fairy tale influenced story of Batwoman’s younger days and even the first appearance of transgender superhero Dreamer (From the Supergirl TV show) in the comics. Depending on the character or creative team, the different stories could be adventurous and flirtatious, heartfelt and emotional, or a bit of both. This book shows that superhero comics have come a long way since the stereotypes of the 1980s and 1990s, but there’s still room for improvement as many of the characters featured in this anthology are relegated to backup stories or are supporting cast members of cisgender, heterosexual heroes.

2. Barbalien: Red Planet (Dark Horse)

Barbalien: Red Planet is a masterfully crafted, queer rage infused superhero/sci-fi comic from Jeff Lemire, Tate Brombal, Gabriel Walta, and Jordie Bellaire. It understands subtext is for cowards and draws parallels between Barbalien coming out as gay and a Martian with his new friend/potential lover Miguel, who is a Latino activist fighting for the US government to do something about the AIDS crisis in the 1980s. Barbalien: Red Planet pays homage to the Black and Latinx activists who fought for queer liberation and is also an emotionally honest character study for Barbalien, who is easily my favorite character in the Black Hammer universe. Lemire, Brombal, and Walta use the superhero and sword and planet genres to explore the conflict between queer folks and power structures as Barbalien struggles with trying to fit into Spiral City as a white cop or being his true, gay Martian self. And to get personal for a second, Barbalien: Red Planet inspired me to speak out against my city’s Pride organization’s open support of police even though it led to me resigning as chairperson of my work’s LGBTQ+ employee affinity group. It’s both a damn good superhero book and a story that had a huge impact on my life in 2020-2021.

1. Die (Image)

My favorite comic of 2021 was Die by Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans that wrapped up with the mother of all quest arcs. But beyond having cool fantasy landscapes and wrapping up each party member’s arc, Die nailed the importance of stories, whether games, comics, films, prose, TV shows etc., to change how we view and interact with the world in both a heightened and realistic manner. Most of the realism came in Die #20 where the main characters escape the world of the game into our reality with the COVID-19 pandemic in full swing and have emotional reunions with loved ones or just hang out by themselves. However, the final arc of Die also is full of existential nightmares courtesy of Hans’ visuals as well as awakenings and self-realization, especially in Die #19 where Ash comes out as non-binary and discusses how games and fiction shaped their identity. The final issues of Die is a double-edged look at the power of narrative and games to shape us done in both glorious and surprisingly intimate fashion, and I felt I really knew Ash, Matt, Angela, Isabelle, Matt, Chuck, and Sol in the end.

Honorable Mentions: Casual Fling (AWA), Nightwing (DC), Made in Korea (Image), Barbaric (Vault), Superman and the Authority (DC), Catwoman: Lonely City (DC/Black Label)

Review: Night of the Ghoul #3

Night of the Ghoul #3

There’s a surprising amount of information already revealed on the central mystery playing out in Scott Snyder and Francesco Francavilla’s Night of the Ghoul. It’s quite refreshing actually, getting a steadier stream of key details on the events surrounding the search for a lost film that might hold the secret to destroying an ancient monster. Of course, this is all owed to a smartly paced script and an art style that makes each panel consistently ramp up the horror and the tension that follows the father and son team at the center of it all.

Night of the Ghoul #3 starts to pull the veil back on the Ghoul’s methods and how long it’s managed to be a hidden but powerful presence in the world. We learn more about the people running the facility where the lost movie’s director lies disfigured and forgotten and we get a better understanding of what the Ghoul might actually be, especially in terms of how it keeps surviving throughout history.

In my review of NotG issue #2, I compared the story to old Hollywood horror classics in both tone and how it develops its ambiance. This issue finds another connection with those movies in terms of pacing. The horror of old didn’t wrap its secrets and mysteries up in a puzzle box-like story structure with twist after twist leading up to a big reveal. They found they could be scarier by leaning into the source of the horror and not by keeping it all hidden. Night of the Ghoul takes to this approach and it pays off in issue #3.

This isn’t to say that everything’s laid out already and that the comic is just people dealing with how terrifying the monsters are. Snyder’s script has been careful not to show its hand entirely, but it’s also generous with the things it shows. It gives readers a lot to chew on with guarantee of more to come.

Night of the Ghoul #3

Francavilla takes every opportunity afforded by the script to create pages full of images that, individually, could serve as cover illustrations themselves not unlike those seen in classic EC Comics. Some of the full-page spreads in this issue stand among some of his finest work and showcase his complete mastery of the language of visual horror.

The black and white movie segments continue to serve as the story’s vault of secrets, but what’s interesting about it is that it’s coming across like a legitimate second story in its own right, with plot and characters to spare. They’re even becoming lengthier every issue, so they there’s room to push the Ghoul’s lore even further and to explore other dark corners that typically get stuck on the cutting room floor in this type of story.

Night of the Ghoul #3 isn’t afraid to dump scary things on readers laps and then leaving it up to them to process it. Its horrors are out in the open, so we’re left to contend with how terrifying things are and how terrifying they can get. In a time where puzzle box mysteries dominate the playing field, Snyder and Francavilla are setting up their own rules and making people engage with the story on their terms. Thankfully, those terms are yielding results, paving the way for more scary things to be gleefully afraid of as they make themselves known.

Story: Scott Snyder, Art: Francesco Francavilla
Art: 9.0 Story: 9.0 Overall: 9.0
Recommendation: Buy and then dust off your old school horror boxed sets for a binge.


Purchase: comiXologyKindle

Preview: Star Wars Adventures #13

Star Wars Adventures #13

(W) George Mann, Danny Lore (A) Butch K. Mapa, Simone D’Armini (CA) Francesco Francavilla
In Shops: Dec 29, 2021
SRP: $3.99

First, from author George Mann (Doctor Who), the Millennium Falcon needs some serious repairs after sitting in disrepair on Jakku. So Rey, Chewie, Finn, and BB-8 have to make a pit stop. But it doesn’t quite go as planned (it never does), and the group quickly finds themselves at the wrong end of a bounty hunter’s blaster.
Then, in a bone-chilling tale from author Danny Lore (Transformers: Shattered Glass, King in Black: Captain America), Darth Vader searches a temple for a hidden tome and nothing-nobody-will stop his wrath.

Star Wars Adventures #13

We Have Demons Comes to Print Starting March 2022

Bestselling writer Scott Snyder’s Best Jacket Press, comiXology Originals, and Dark Horse Comics have announced that Dark Horse will publish print editions of the comiXology Originals titles from Snyder’s Best Jackett Press. The print publishing program kicks off in spring 2022 with the release of periodical issues of We Have Demons by Snyder, superstar artist and co-creator Greg Capullo, inker Jonathan Glapion, colorist Dave McCaig, and letterer Tom Napolitano. All three periodical issues of We Have Demons will feature variant covers by superstar artists, with issue 1 debuting in March. The trade paperback of We Have Demons will be published by Dark Horse in summer 2022.

We Have Demons features full throttle entertainment by two comic book megastars, featuring action, conspiracies, secret organizations, monsters, mayhem, and a climactic war of good and evil with no less than the fate of the world hanging in the balance. The periodical issues will be released monthly, with each issue featuring bonus material and a main cover by Greg Capullo. Each issue will also have variant cover options including a foil variant cover of the main cover as well as a variant cover by one of Snyder’s incredible collaborators:

  • We Have Demons #1 features a variant cover by Jock [on sale March 23, 2022]
  • We Have Demons #2 features a variant cover by Francis Manapul [on sale April 20, 2022]
  • We Have Demons #3 features a variant cover by Francesco Francavilla [on sale May 18, 2022]

We Have Demons is currently the only one of the Best Jackett/comiXology Originals titles that will be released as a print periodical.

The We Have Demons trade paperback will be released on August 9, 2022 and is available for pre-order through AmazonBarnes and Noble and your local comic shop.

We Have Demons #1

Preview: The Joker #10

The Joker #10

Written by: Sam Johns, Matthew Rosenberg
Art by: Belén Ortega, Francesco Francavilla

Following the harrowing events of Batman: The Killing Joke, the course of James Gordon’s life-and that of his family’s-was forever changed! But what happened when Gordon’s path again crossed with The Joker’s… PUNCHLINE BACKUP: Harper Row has successfully gotten Punchline’s former friend, Kelly Ness, out of Blackgate. What Kelly reveals about Punchline’s past and true nature will change her criminal case forever, but will Harper and Leslie Thompkins be able to protect her from Punchline’s loyalists?

The Joker #10

Preview: James Bond: Himeros #3

James Bond: Himeros #3

writer: Rodney Barnes
artist: Pierluigi Minotti
covers: Francesco Francavilla (A), Butch Guice (B), Francesco Francavilla (C-RI/BW)
FC | 32 pages | Spy/Fiction, Action/Adventure | $3.99 | Teen+

James Bond continues to unravel the horror he’s uncovered as he makes his way to the center of it all – Wilhelm’s island – with the reluctant Sarah Richmond in tow. All the while: Kino continues to stalk the pair, awaiting his moment to strike!

Featuring two amazing covers: Francesco Francavilla and the legendary Butch Guice!

Did you know: Ian Fleming was a well-known as a book collector. He founded The Book Collector the same year he published Casino Royale.

James Bond: Himeros #3

Review: The Joker Annual 2021

The Joker Annual 2021

Although the character is overexposed in both comics and other media, The Joker is one of DC’s most underrated current comics. It’s a multi-layered crime saga starring Jim Gordon, who has left the police force and is grappling with his need to take revenge on Joker while juggling a million other plates and forces, including clones in the last issue that came out. Arguably, the best installment of the comic was The Joker #5 with Matthew Rosenberg and Francesco Francavilla collaborating with series writer James Tynion that’s a worthy companion to Batman Year One thanks to its noir-like visuals and deep insight into the character of Gordon. The Joker Annual 2021 is the sequel to Joker #5 and is set during a, well, interesting time when organized crime is on the decline thanks to folks like Carmine Falcone being behind bars. However, there is still crime, but it’s mostly harmless pranks like the Joker robbing a Mexican candy factory with the help of a pre-Secret Six glow up Catman. But this seeming lull in the action doesn’t snuff out Gordon’s crusade to clean up Gotham, especially the dirty members of the police force, and these overt actions come back to bite him and only stoke the flames of his vendetta against the Joker any more.

The Joker Annual 2021 feels like if The Dark Knight and the 1960s Batman TV show had a beautiful baby, and this is definitely meant as a compliment. The comic’s tone is gritty police procedural meets pop art. With The Joker doing candy-centered crimes, Francesco Francavilla uses a fittingly garish color palette while going back to reds and blacks when Gordon is raiding warehouses or firing cops. His approach to storytelling is powerful and enhances Tynion and Rosenberg’s characterization like when Batgirl drops Catman from the sky onto a squad car while two cops argue if they should call her Batgirl or Batlady. Francavilla also shows the homicidal maniac hiding behind the clown when the Joker actually gets “serious” any time someone questions his methods adding a bit of shadow to his teeth and lipstick. His crimes might seem ridiculous compared to his modern appearances, but Joker does some real damage throughout the story and worst of all, shows Jim Gordon that he can’t have law and order in this city.

James Tynion and Matthew Rosenberg’s dialogue is a real treat in The Joker Annual 2021 with Harvey Bullock using blurred out expletives like a lethal weapon to Jim Gordon using pointed questions and contradictions to find out one of his men who is still corrupt. Bullock doesn’t have an arc like Gordon or especially Gotham City, but he and Barbara Gordon act as the voices of pragmatism and reality as fired police officers make great villainous henchmen. He’s portrayed as a high functioning alcoholic, and it’s presented as a personal flaw instead of a systemic flaw like the corrupt police officers. Tynion, Rosenberg, and Francesco Francavilla don’t go full “ACAB” in The Joker Annual 2021, but they do show how freed of their badge and uniform that police officers will do even worst things.

I do like how this comic shows that Gotham is truly a rotten system with the power vacuum of the mob leading to supervillains like Joker, Black Mask, Penguin, and Killer Croc taking over as well as firing all the bad cops at once having consequences like funding issues or them becoming Joker’s foot soldiers. In a highly stylized way, The Joker Annual 2021 shows that corrupt systems can’t truly be fixed from within, which is where vigilantes like Batgirl and Batman come in. However, despite helping against Catman, they spend most of the issue causing property damage and complicating Gordon’s police deployment strategy as he’s torn between 100% taking their side and following the usual protocol.

Francavilla draws Gordon with a look of consternation for much of the issue, and he really is over his head for most of the book struggling to balance cleaning up Gotham with being a father. Until she shows up with a bruise and isn’t in her bed at 2:30 AM, Gordon barely pays attention to Barbara and makes his favorite meal instead of hers while also demonstrating workaholic tendency. This workaholism completely obliterates his relationship with his off-panel son, Jim Jr., who is with his ex-wife in Chicago as Gordon won’t visit him although he has a lot more vacation time as a police commissioner versus a detective. Gordon’s decision in this matter ends up having real ramifications in future storylines, including The Joker. He tries to have it all and ends up broken with final pages acting as a grim punchline to his attempts to end mob corruption once and for all in Gotham. That stuff never ends, or why would we still have Batman and Batman-adjacent stories.

The Joker Annual 2021 is a masterpiece of day-glo crime storytelling from Francesco Francavilla, who can create tension from a flashlight or a cigarette butt as well as James Tynion and Matthew Rosenberg, who continue to flesh out Jim Gordon and his relationship with his daughter Barbara and the clown prince of crime. Like Joker #5, this comic easily stands on its own, but also adds context (Aka emotional scarring) to Gordon’s actions as he haphazardly tries to create his own system for taking out the Joker while keeping his soul intact.

Story: James Tynion IV, Matthew Rosenberg 
Art/Colors: Francesco Francavilla Letters: Tom Napolitano
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Maniac of New York: The Bronx is Burning Gets Horror Fanatic Variant Covers

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #1

Writer: Elliott Kalan 
Artist: Andrea Mutti 
Letterer: Taylor Esposito 
Cover: Andrea Mutti 
Maniac Harry Mask Variant: Andrea Mutti 
Incentive Cover: Jonathan Luna
$4.99 / 32 Pages / Color / On Sale 12.01.21 

The bloody saga of Maniac Harry continues!  

After the tragedy of The Death Train, Detective Zelda Pettibone and mayoral aide Gina Greene have lost the trail of the Maniac — and the support of the city. Copycats are springing up, tensions are high and traffic is a nightmare. So, what happens when your favorite unstoppable, mindless killer resurfaces in a Bronx high school? Can Zelda and Gina get there before Maniac Harry adds to his body count? Will the students tear their attention away from their phones long enough to notice there’s a monster in the halls?   

Writer Elliott Kalan and artist Andrea Mutti return for the next chapter of the hit horror-satire that’s somehow even scarier than the world we actually live in! 

MANIAC OF NEW YORK BRONX BURNING #1 CVR B MUTTI MASK

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #2

Writer: Elliott Kalan 
Artist: Andrea Mutti 
Letterer: Taylor Esposito 
Cover: Andrea Mutti 
Horror Fanatic Cover: David Lopez
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 01.12.22

Maniac Harry is loose in a Bronx high school, and it’s not so he can finish his GED!  

With video of Harry’s bloody rampage going viral, seemingly everyone is converging on Bright Future Academy: protestors, police, media and our heroes, Mayoral Aide Gina Greene and NYPD Detective Zelda Pettibone. Can the so-called grown-ups get out of each other’s way in time? And what happens when an ordinary student risks his life to save his classmates, only to be chased by the worst bully of them all: The Maniac? 

Each issue of MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING features 24 pages of story and art with a cardstock cover!

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #2

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #3

Writer: Elliott Kalan 
Artist: Andrea Mutti 
Letterer: Taylor Esposito 
Cover: Andrea Mutti 
Horror Fanatic Variant Cover: Robert Hack
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 02.16.22

Gina Greene and Zelda Pettibone are face-to-face with Maniac Harry once more, and they’re armed with enough Molotov cocktails to burn down the borough! But the Mayor of New York seems determined to get in their way. Can Gina and Zelda stop Harry before his body count rises?  

SPOILER ALERT: They can’t! There’s only one issue left after this one, and it just might be the biggest bloodbath yet! 

Each issue of MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING features 24 pages of story and art with a cardstock cover! 

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #3

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #4

Writer: Elliott Kalan 
Artist: Andrea Mutti 
Letterer: Taylor Esposito 
Cover: Andrea Mutti 
Horror Fanatic Variant Cover: Francesco Francavilla
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 03.23.22

Maniac Harry plus Opening Day at Yankee Stadium. YOU DO THE MATH! Civil servant-turned-angel-of-vengeance Gina Greene is determined to make this her final showdown with the Maniac. Can she finally destroy the monster that’s haunted her all these years? And how much of New York will she have to burn to make it happen? 

Each issue of MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING features 24 pages of story and art with a cardstock cover! 

MANIAC OF NEW YORK: THE BRONX IS BURNING #4
Almost American
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