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Preview: Nuclear Power #5

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell
Artist: Lynne Yoshii
Publisher: Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 22 pages August 18, 2021
For Mature Readers
Purchase: comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Preview: Nuclear Power #5

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell
Artist: Lynne Yoshii
Publisher: Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 22 pages August 18, 2021
For Mature Readers
Purchase: comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Ripple Effects Explores Life as a Superhero with an Invisible and Incurable Disease

Fanbase Press has announced a new addition to its publishing slate and its first foray into Graphic Medicine with Ripple Effects, a five-issue comic book series created, written, and colored by Jordan Hart, illustrated by Bruno Chiroleu, flatted by Shane Kadlecik, lettered by Oceano Ransford, and featuring cover art by Justin C. Harder.

Ripple Effects explores life as a superhero with an invisible and incurable disease. It’s like The Incredibles meets the dramedy, 50/50.

In a world that is no stranger to superheroes, George Gibson is invulnerable to physical harm but fights every day to stay alive. Suffering from an acute case of type 1 diabetes, his invincibility is offset by a defective pancreas that must be monitored and treated daily. This incurable disease makes George’s body both his greatest strength and his eternal weakness.

The series is one near and dear to creator Jordan Hart who lives with an invisible and incurable blood-clotting disease called thrombophilia.

In the announcement, Hart said:

40% of Americans have an incurable disease, some more lethal than others. A superhero who struggles with medical bills, weekly doctor visits, and the anxiety of depending on daily, erratic treatments seems well overdue.

What sets this series apart is a positive, person-first representation about life with a chronic disease . . . which just so happens to also include superhuman abilities. But, Ripple Effects isn’t just a story about a character with an incurable disease. It’s also a thrilling and relevant superhero tale that touches on the difficulty of finding a work/life balance, the class struggles and economic inequality experienced by many in our nation, and the desire to help others during trying times.

Issues #1-5 of the comic book series will be released digitally through ComiXology and Hoopla Digital starting in the summer of 2022. In addition, the series will be collected into a printed trade paperback following the digital release.  The Ripple Effects trade paperback is currently available for pre-order through the Fanbase Press website. Pre-orders made by August 1, 2022, will receive an exclusive print illustrated and signed by series creator Jordan Hart.

Ripple Effects

Review: Nuclear Power #4

Nuclear Power #4

The truth has been revealed and soldiers of the American Union are set to clash with those cast off from society. Nuclear Power #4 delivers an entertaining chapter full of twists and turns as sides are chosen.

Nuclear Power #4 continues what has been an intriguing series that underneath feels like a not-so-veiled parable about choice, especially body autonomy. Desirée Proctor and Erica Harrell have crafted an interesting story that has delivered an alternate world where men make decisions for all, especially women. This issue, as well as the previous, feels like they’re starting to show what the world would look like if that wasn’t the case.

This issue is all about the confrontation between the American Union and variants. The bodies rise and tragedy mounts. It delivers a skirmish that feels scaled down in some ways keeping the series away from a massive battle that would probably feel like it doesn’t quite belong in the series.

Lynne Yoshii‘s art continues to impress. Yoshii’s art has a look that reminds me of Des Taylor, a little throwback in some ways and it works so well for the series. What’s great about the art is that it just fits the world so well with a balance between being “modern” and the throwback alternate world that it takes place in.

Nuclear Power #4 continues the excellent series with just two more issues left. We now know where the lines are and who has betrayed who. It’s been an interesting series that has delivered action, twists, and some interesting moral debates within. This is an alternate history that wants to teach us about our history and challenge or present.

Story: Desirée Proctor, Erica Harrell Art: Lynne Yoshii
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fanbase Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Nuclear Power #4

Nuclear Power #4

Written by Erica Harrell, Desiree Proctor
Art by Lynne Yoshii
Colored by Lynne Yoshii
Cover by Lynne Yoshii
Lettered by Lynne Yoshii
Purchase: comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war. Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it. Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history tale that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens. When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

Nuclear Power #4

Preview: Nuclear Power #3

Nuclear Power #3

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell (Deadshot: Mercy, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Artist: Lynne Yoshii (DC’s Gotham Garage, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Publisher:  Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 23 pages | Fanbase Press | June 16, 2021
For Mature Readers | Available on Hoopla & ComiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

Nuclear Power #3

Review: Nuclear Power #2

Nuclear Power #2

Nuclear Power #2 delivers some answers to the mysteries set up in the first issue. It also adds so much danger and tension to the series. In the second issue, Claudia agrees to go with Reed and Iris in an effort to protect her patient, Lucy. Through that, we’re able to learn more about the Variants’ unnatural abilities and some of the secrets the American Union holds.

Desirée Proctor and Erica Harrell do a solid job of balancing the aspects of the comic. We get some solid action in an escape, some answers, and a setup of something nefarious. The trio of focuses really helps balance the second issue with a nice variation to the narrative.

What Nuclear Power #2 does really well is deliver some answers. It’d have been easy to drag out who the Variants are and what they want. Instead, the creative team gives us some answers. Though rather simple, they help set up the various sides and allows the reader to better understand who the villains are.

The issue is a little bumpy in one sense in the action sequence. After delivering some solid moments it just kind of shifts and we accept everyone escapes without really showing us how. With the way things were going, it’d have been nice to have seen that to give a bit more information about the sequence and the world. I found myself lingering on that aspect a bit more than I probably should have.

The art continues to be fantastic. Lynne Yoshii provides the art which feels like a cross between Des Taylor and Batman: The Animated Series. It’s a fantastic style and delivers a world that feels like there’s some thought put into it as to how it’d differ from ours. The issue feels like it falls a bit more into the Batman: The Animated Series side of the style, especially in the action and Variants. That’s a good thing as that show’s look is iconic and helps build out the details of the world.

Nuclear Power #2 is another solid issue. It’s really set things up well and I have no idea what direction it plans to go. It could easily veer into a more X-Men type story. It could also stick to its more grounded aspects of a world controlled by the military. Hopefully, it finds a nice balance between those as it’s done so far. There’s a lot to come based off this issue making this a series to really keep your eye on so you don’t miss out.

Story: Desirée Proctor, Erica Harrell Art: Lynne Yoshii
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fanbase Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Nuclear Power #2

NUCLEAR POWER #2

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell
Artist: Lynne Yoshii
Publisher: Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 23 pages | Fanbase Press | May 19, 2021
For Mature Readers | Available on Hoopla & comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

NUCLEAR POWER #2

Review: Nuclear Power #1

Nuclear Power #1

Nuclear Power #1 is a very unexpected debut that’s thought-provoking and somewhat shocking. The alternate history kicks off with the Cuban Missile Crisis and instead of a de-escalation, an exchange takes place devastating the United States. Taking place 60 years later, the US is now the American Union comprised of thirteen states and governed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Their military rule governs and helps rebuild society while protecting the survivors. Nuclear radiation has impacted society enhancing some but also making birth difficult for others.

With a story by Desirée Proctor and Erica Harrell, Nuclear Power #1 is an intriguing debut. Its themes touch upon so much including liberty, the pursuit of happiness, and the right to life. Yes, abortion is at the center of the comic in many ways but the right to life extends beyond that to the survivors beyond a wall built to protect the American Union.

But, what stands out to be about Nuclear Power #1 are the small details. The world has been fleshed out with the impact of the alternate history playing a major role. Things like the Civil Rights movement wouldn’t have played out. The women’s rights movement of the 1960s and 70s as well would not have happened. The result is both a forward (in some ways) society and a backward one.

In the American Union, abortion is used regularly to terminate pregnancies impacted by radiation. Women though are clearly seen as second class in some ways who have an important role in helping repopulate the American Union. But, women also hold high ranks in the military infrastructure but also are called “emotional” in being dressed down. There’s an interesting mix of attitudes within the comic, one that’s fascinating to think about and deconstruct. Without social movements, in a military-focused and controlled society, how would things evolve as a society? Nuclear Power #1 delivers some thoughts concerning that.

The art by Lynne Yoshii is fantastic. The comic sticks to a black, red, and off-white coloring and style that evokes propaganda posters of the past. The style is very reminiscent of Des Taylor, a high compliment, and it works so well. While the page layouts mainly stick to various combinations of panels, there’s a focus on facial expressions that add a weight of emotion to the story. Like the society itself, there’s a focus on details that add to the story as well. The dress and technology feel like a throwback but also not quite as antiquated as the 1960s. There’s some small advancement but not a jump to what we’d expect in today’s world. There’s a focus on the military dress that presents a clean and organized society, stiff in many ways.

Nuclear Power #1 is a hell of a start. The alternate history story feels relevant in many ways and delivers a focus on details that’s unexpected and very welcomed. It’s a series that feels well-thought-out. The art has a sense to it that’s both beautiful and off-putting to look at. The comic as a whole gives a sense of order but something’s off. It’s a deliver that sucks you in making you want to find out more and explore the deeper meanings of what the comic is trying to deliver.

Story: Desirée Proctor, Erica Harrell Art: Lynne Yoshii
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fanbase Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Nuclear Power #1

NUCLEAR POWER #1

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell (Deadshot: Mercy, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Artist: Lynne Yoshii (DC’s Gotham Garage, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Publisher:  Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 28 pages | Fanbase Press | April 21, 2021
For Mature Readers | Available on Hoopla & ComiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

Almost American
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