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Jace Fox Heads to New York City in February in I Am Batman #6

The fallout from Fear State begins next year as Jace Fox and his family leave Gotham for a new home base. I Am Batman #6, written by John Ridley, shifts the series permanently to New York. I Am Batman #6 marks the first time an ongoing Batman title will be based in New York City since issue #47 of Detective Comics in January 1941. Gotham City makes its official debut in the DC Universe later that same year, in Batman #4 and Detective Comics #48. 

From his first appearance in DC’s Future State event, to developing his history and mission in The Next Batman: Second Son, to joining Batman and his allies in defeating The Scarecrow and The Magistrate in Fear State, Jace Fox has become a rich addition to the Bat-family at the hands of Ridley.

On sale February 8, 2022, I Am Batman #6 (“Empire State of Mind”) features art by Ken Lashley, colors by Rex Lokus, and letters by Troy Peteri. The book features a main cover by Olivier Coipel and Alex Sinclair, with a primary variant by Francesco Mattina. Fans can also pre-order the book with a special 1:25 ratio variant cover by Khary Randolph and Emilio Lopez, as well as a special Black History Month variant cover by Alexis Franklin.

To see exactly what drives Jace and his family to move to New York, make sure to also check out I Am Batman #5, available in stores and on participating digital platforms on Tuesday, January 11. 2022.

Jackson Hyde Makes Waves in Aquaman: The Becoming

Jackson Hyde finally has it all. Mentors who support him, a community that loves him, an honest relationship with his mother, a cute new guy in Amnesty Bay who’s caught his eye, and access to Aquaman’s private training facility in Atlantis. Well, he had it all—until that training facility and half of the Atlantean palace got blown to kingdom come with Jackson in them. Now Jackson stands accused of wrecking the life he worked so hard to build. Aqualad’s going to need all of his skills, wit, and cunning just to prove his own innocence, let alone graduate from sidekick to Aquaman!

Written by Brandon Thomas and drawn by Diego Olortegui, along with artists Wade von Grawbadger, Scott Koblish, Skylar Patridge, and Adriano LucasAquaman: The Becoming is a six-issue miniseries that will shine the spotlight on the DC Universe’s newest Aqualad for the very first time! Take a look into the first issue and, to be sure you get a copy at launch, preorder Aquaman: The Becoming from your local comic shop before August 29! Aquaman: The Becoming #1 arrives wherever comic books are sold on September 21.

Throughout the new series Jackson will have to confront his past (including a visit to the destroyed and abandoned West Coast Titans Tower!), survive the fight of his life with the mysterious new villain DELUGE, and much more! Is this Aqualad ready to become Aquaman?

Jackson Hyde officially arrives and will headline Aquaman: The Becoming #1 on September 21, but before his big first issue hits shelves, his journey will kick off in Aquaman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super-Spectacular #1 on August 31 with a short story by Thomas, Olortegui, von Grawbadger and Lucas! Stay tuned!

Aquaman: The Becoming by Brandon Thomas, Diego Olortegui, Wade von Grawbadger, Scott Koblish, Skylar Patridge and Adriano Lucas will be available in print and as a digital comic book. Lettering for the series will be by AndWorld Design’s Deron Bennett. Covers are by David Talaski and variant covers are by Khary Randolph and Emilio Lopez. Francis Manapul’s variant cover for Aquaman: The Becoming #1 connects to his variant cover for Black Manta #1 (on sale September 7).

Sea Serpent’s Heir Debuts in Skybound X #4!

Image Comics and Skybound revealed a first look at Skybound X #4, the penultimate chapter of the weekly comic book event of the summer! It’s the first appearance of Sea Serpent’s Heir, one of the most buzzed-about graphic novel releases of 2022, and the next shocking chapter of “Rick Grimes 2000”! Plus, two of Skybound’s most iconic series debut all-new stories here, with new chapters of Redneck, revealing a surprising connection you never expected to your favorite 80s rock band, and Excellence, featuring some major new (and magical) First Appearances!  

This extra-length issues delivers all the thrills courtesy of Robert Kirkman, Ryan Ottley, Donny Cates, Lisandro Estherren, Brandon Thomas, Khary RandolphEmilio LopezMairghred Scott, and Pablo Tunica.

Skybound X #4  will be available at  comic book shops  and digital platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, comiXology, and Google Play on Wednesday, July 28: 

  • Skybound X #4 Cover A by Charlie Adlard (Diamond Code MAY210049) 
  • Skybound X #4 Cover B by Khary Randolph (Diamond Code MAY210050) 
  • Skybound X #4 Cover C by Pablo Tunica (Diamond Code MAY210051) 
  • Skybound X #4 Cover D 1:10 Incentive Cover by Khary Randolph (Diamond Code APR219076) 
  • Skybound X #4 Cover E 1:10 Incentive Cover by Pablo Tunica (Diamond Code APR219077) 
  • Skybound X #4 Cover F 1:25 Incentive Cover by Charlie Adlard (Diamond Code APR219078) 

Review: Infinite Frontier #0

Infinite Frontier #0

Dark Knights: Death Metal is over and we’ve seen a possible future timeline in “Future State”. Now, DC begins to chart its path with the first crumbs teased in Infinite Frontier #0. The issue serves as a guide as to the various series and status-quo that awaits them. With a new omniverse to explore, anything is possible and the comic does its job to remind us of that.

The comic’s story is delivered in a narrative driven by two characters as our guide. It’s a spin on the classic Christmas Carol and It’s a Wonderful Life. Wonder Woman believes a threat is looming and wants to witness the state of things before making a major decision about her role in the DC Universe.

With Wonder Woman and Spectre as our guide, we’re taken on a tour of the characters highlighting the comics to come. The Justice League, Batman, Wonder Girl, Alan Scott, Teen Titans Academy, Superman, Green Arrow and Black Canary, Star Girl, Green Lanterns, and the Flash all get a moment to show off where things stand. All of it is good and interesting though few of what’s presented really excites. It feels like an extended teaser and preview. It takes its concept as a guidebook almost too seriously. The comic feels a bit more like the extension of the ending of Dark Knights: Death Metal where we saw many of these ideas initially teased.

Infinite Frontier #0 credits

But, what’s intriguing is what’s presented and doesn’t have a comic attached to them. Infinite Frontier #0 teases more than what’s already announced giving hope as to what we’ll see in July and beyond. There’s also teases through artwork of the various series DC teased at the recent ComicsPro. It’s interesting in that way that the stories feel less like the exciting first 15 minutes before the credits to get you pumped. Instead, the stories are a bit dry and more to lay out where things stand with the concepts thrown out being the hooks. The action isn’t the hook, the ideas are.

The art of the comic is solid. Each segment flows into the next and with a few exceptions, the styles work well together. There are some fantastic spreads with Wonder Woman as she talks to Spectre about what she’s witnessing. There’s a few panels and pages that’ll leave you lingering to stare at. The colors really pop on pages delivering a sense of energy that really fits the new status of the DC Universe.

Infinite Frontier #0 isn’t bad but it doesn’t quite excite. By the end of the issue I found myself more excited about concepts than the comics themselves. Very few of the segments left me wanting to immediately find out what happens next. Instead, it the comic feels like a short ashcan, teasing what’s to come with a few pages and back material to fill things out. It shows what’s to come but it never quite puts things over. Instead, it nails its role as a guide, a way to browse what DC has to offer.

Story: Brian Michael Bendis, James Tynion IV, Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad, Joëlle Jones, Tim Sheridan, Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Joshua Williamson, Geoff Johns, Geoffrey Thorne
Art: David Marquez, Jorge Jimeez, Alitha Martinez, Mark Morales, Joëlle Jones, Stephen Byrne, Rafa Sandoval, Jordi Tarragona, Jamal Igle, Alex Maleev, Todd Nauck, Dexter Soy, Howard Porter, John Romita, Jr., Klaus Janson
Color: Tamra Bonvillain, Tomeu Morey, Emilio Lopez, Jordie Bellaire, Stephen Byrne, Alejandro Sanchez, Hi-Fi, Alex Sinclair, Brad Anderson
Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2

Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2

The lead story in Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2 deals with the actual end of the DC Universe, and it’s brilliant, poetic work from writers Becky Cloonan and Michael W. Conrad and artist Jen Bartel. We get to see the final battle between Superman and Darkseid, and it’s epic as hell. However, it’s not the center of the narrative, which is Wonder Woman traveling the universe looking for signs of life and hope and trying to avoid the Undoing. Except for the ending and little glimmers, this whole issue is Diana staring into the abyss and trying to find purpose in a world that doesn’t need saving anymore and is truly in its death throes.

In the first issue, Jen Bartel demonstrated that she could operate on an epic scale in both linework and color palette, and this extends to Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2. Her punches have true power and weight behind them, the lasso finds the truth in the last few characters it entangles, and the contrast between light and shadow in her color palette is operatic, especially in Wonder Woman’s final moments as well as Superman and Darkseid’s. There’s a kind of glow in her trail as she flies across the void of space, past the ruins of the Daily Planet or Brainiac’s ship, that is in direct opposition of the black tendrils of the Undoing. Cloonan and Conrad don’t go deep into The Undoing’s backstory, but they’re the inevitability personified and wipe out the whole Legion of Superheroes in a single page that establishes their universe ending threat level. They’re like “The End” on the last page of a story, and the final pages of Immortal Wonder Woman #2 definitely take on a metafictional quality and set up yet another myth cycle.

Cloonan, Conrad, and Bartel definitely use the lead story of Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2 to deal with weighty philosophical issues, like the purpose (or purposelessness) of life and the effects of revenge, especially when Spectre comes into the picture. The whole Ragnarok/Twilight of the Gods vibe carries through from the previous issue, but with the Undoing, not Darkseid, being responsible for the end of the universe. In the big picture, he’s just a god, not an unknowable cosmic force. These themes and ideas as well as the general scale of Jen Bartel’s visuals truly makes this story feel like it’s a kind of modern mythology instead of using gods from various pantheons as window dressing, comic relief, or public domain action figures.

However, Becky Cloonan, Michael Conrad, and Jen Bartel don’t forget what makes these myths and legends endure, and that is these heroes’ flaws and recognizable emotions. (For example, young queer people are making Tik Toks about Achilles and Patroclus just like Alexander the Great was writing fan fiction about them two millennia ago.) Bartel does a wonderful job showing Wonder Woman’s emotions throughout the story with many close-ups of her crying, and those tears floating in space to make these panels even more tragic. She also differentiates sad tears like when she witnesses Superman’s death from happy ones like when she finds the Spectre, the last living being. However, Wonder Woman isn’t all sadness in Immortal Wonder Woman #2. There’s a lot of anger too, especially in her last fight, against the Undoing as Cloonan and Conrad’s narration reveal her last thoughts about how she’s a contradictory figure: a warrior, yet peaceful. This ties into the conclusion of the two part storyline, which is quite satisfying, primal, and touches on the nature of immortality in a very cosmological way.

Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2’s second story, “Nubia”, definitely plays second fiddle to the lead story with writer L.L. McKinney continuing to cram a six issue miniseries’ amount of lore and exposition in six issues. However, she and artists Alitha Martinez and Mark Morales and colorist Emilio Lopez do show Nubia being a hero and kicking ass against the likes of Grail and Circe, who Grail has summoned to get the last artifact: Nubia’s tiara. This artifact is magical, and Grail is more into science so she needs an assist from a sorceress of her own. However, little does she know, that this crown is imbued with magic from the Yoruba goddess, Oshun, and it only strengthens Nubia. But, of course, there is a price, and Nubia still owns Aunt Nancy a favor. McKinney definitely leaves plenty of plot threads and potential supporting players and goddesses on the table for future stories.

But for most of the pages of “Nubia”, McKinney, Martinez, and Morales focus on the task at hand: a battle royale between Nubia, Grail, and Circe. Grail and Circe definitely underestimate their opponent so it’s quite vindicated when she breaks free from their control in an iconic full page image, and then throws, kicks, and punches them in a double page spread. Instead of going the stiff pinup route, Martinez and Morales use the spread to showcase Nubia’s speed and strength using borderless panels for her battle with Grail and the bordered panels for her fight against Circe. The choreography is gorgeous in this sequence as McKinney, Martinez, Morales, and Lopez are all on the same page and cut to the best moves. For example, Nubia ducks under a magic blast from Circe and switches opponents to throw Grail with her super strength before delivering a gut punch to the sorceress. Alitha Martinez’s layout choices give a real flow to the action while Mark Morales accentuates details like Nubia’s shoulder muscles when she hurls Circe into the sky, and Emilio Lopez uses bright primary colors during intense moments like when Circe and Grail struggle to take Nubia’s crown off.

Although, these characters are highly powered, the fight has a personal feel to it culminating in Nubia reinforcing the fact that she’s Wonder Woman, an Amazon warrior, and you can’t take important artifacts from her. L.L. McKinney gives Nubia some great one-liners to show that she’s becoming more confident as a hero and coming into her own as a “Guardian”. The flashback with the different gods might be a little text-heavy, but seeing Nubia break free from a villain who is literally staring her down and saying “Submit” is well worth it. But she doesn’t get a chance to celebrate in the epilogue of this story, and Martinez and Morales draw her with tense body language while setting up another potential arc down the road. I’ve really grown to enjoy Nubia’s courage and determination as well Alitha Martinez’s fight choreography, and I would definitely like to see more stories with this creative team. Having a Nubia limited or ongoing series would also give L.L. McKinney an opportunity to pace out some of her worldbuilding elements as well as her protagonist’s connection to Yoruba mythology and Akan folklore plus the magical/superheroic side of Atlanta in the DC Universe.

Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #2 wraps up with two very different takes on the iconic DC Comics superhero. Becky Cloonan, Michael Conrad, and Jen Bartel tell an archetypal self-contained story of life and death, hope and despair, and finding purpose when there’s nothing to live for starring Diana Prince. Plus it really captures the range of emotions one would feel before the inevitable end of the universe. In the second story, L.L. McKinney, Alitha Martinez, Mark Morales, and Emilio Lopez cram in lore, exposition, multiple villains, and one kick-ass fight scene to lay the foundation for future stories featuring Nubia. It’s like a two-hour pilot screaming for a series order whereas the lead story is a beautiful elegy with career-best interior art from Jen Bartel, who masterfully depicts both the cosmic and human.

Story: Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad, L.L. McKinney Art: Jen Bartel, Alitha Martinez with Mark Morales
Colors: Jen Bartel, Emilio Lopez Letterer: Pat BrosseauBecca Carey
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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It’s Truth and Justice and Romance in Today’s Digital Comic Releases

ComiXology has two new digital releases today on its platform. The latest issue of Truth & Justice from DC and a new romance manga from Harlequin is what’s available. Get shopping or check them out below.

Truth & Justice (2021-) #4

Written by Brandon M. Easton
Pencils Jahnoy Lindsay
Inks Jahnoy Lindsay
Colored by Marissa Louise
Cover by Emilio Lopez, Khary Randolph
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Prisoners around Metropolis are waking up in their old homes, unaware of how they got there and being accused of escaping from Stryker’s Island. Superman will need to use all of his powers, and his journalistic skills, if he’s going to save the prisoners and get them properly exonerated!

Truth & Justice (2021-) #4

Les Élans Du Cœur

Written by Nalini Singh
Art by Tomoko Takakura
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Taylor n’a plus le choix. Après avoir élevé son demi-frère maternel chéri pendant des d’années, son beau-père abusif demande soudainement sa garde afin d’avoir un héritier. Taylor raconte son histoire à son ancien chef, Jackson, qui lui fait une proposition surprenante : que Taylor et lui se marient le plus vite possible pour demander la garde de son frère. C’est vrai qu’avec un producteur de films talentueux et reconnu dans le monde entier pour mari, son beau-père aurait bien du mal à obtenir ce qu’il veut. Mais pourquoi cette proposition ? Leur relation n’a jamais été que professionnelle. Elle comprend très vite lorsque Jackson lui déclare : « je veux avoir un bébé dans l’année. »

Les Élans Du Cœur

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Excellence Gets a Deluxe Hardcover Version on Kickstarter

Brandon Thomas and Khary Randolph, Deron Bennett, and Emilio Lopez’s Skybound and Image Comics action fantasy series Excellence is getting an exclusive deluxe hardcover, available exclusively through Kickstarter. Comic book enthusiasts can order starting on February 23, 2021. 

Excellence: Book One will encompass the first nine issues of the magic series, with additional never-before seen content. The deluxe hardcover is the first release from Skybound Signature, a line of graphic novels debuting on Kickstarter.

Excellence Deluxe Edition Book One

Review: Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1

Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1

Some Future State stories have dealt with dark, dystopian futures, but the lead story in Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1 takes it a step further with Diana, the remaining Amazons, and an aging Superman fighting to defend Swamp Thing, the Green, and basically the symbol of life on Earth from both Darkseid and the Anti-Life Equation. Writers Becky Cloonan and Michael Conrad and spectacular artist Jen Bartel tell a story about fighting a war with love to the bitter end as Diana doesn’t want to fight for the dying Earth and instead start somewhere fresh with Swamp Thing and her sisters, but is overridden by the warlike Amazons as well as Darkseid popping in for one last chance to conquer Earth.

Cloonan and Conrad’s writing in Immortal Wonder Woman #1 can be described as truly poetic and matches the emotion-tinged visual from Bartel. The opening sequence has Diana interacting with a hologram of Batman and meditating on their relationship as part of DC’s Trinity’s with Batman telling her that she’s a true symbol of hope to rally around. However, Diana is also a realist about what’s going as she wistfully sees a star blink out of existence, and the story cuts to Apokolips where Darkseid realizes the end aka the Anti-Life Equation is near and abandons his empire, son Orion, and follower Big Barda and immediately heads to Earth. Bartel does a great job of contrasting the Amazons’ perspective of Earth with its reality using an almost beach vacation color palette for when the Amazons decide to defend the planet from an unknown threat to using a dark and rusty one for when Darkseid flies through space to the “husk”.

Jen Bartel is known for beautiful character design and capturing deep emotion out of her figures, but she can also draw one hell of a fight scene when Diana and Darkseid finally throw down with again Superman having one heroic moment and then getting flattened. She channels her inner Jack Kirby with colorful explosions and speed lines every time Darkseid lands a blow, or Diana kicks the Apokoliptian tyrant or gets a grip on him with her lasso. Bartel also uses interesting (or heartbreaking) panel shapes like when she lays one out that looks just like Darkseid’s Omega sanction and ends in a stark, panel of skulls on a stark background. On a more macro-level, Cloonan and Conrad keep the objective of the battle high, yet simple, Diana, the Amazons, and Superman have to protect Swamp Thing from Darkseid and the Anti-Life Equation for a chance at filling Earth (or maybe a new planet) with life again. The stakes of this comic are literally life and death.

The first story in Immortal Wonder Woman #1 is a Ragnarok for the DC Universe courtesy of Becky Cloonan, Michael Conrad, and Jen Bartel, who makes everyone look epic, pretty, and/or war worn while nailing the look and color palette of utter cosmic darkness too. It’s the last of the old gods battling the embodiment of utter evil with only a small chance for rebirth in the form of Swamp Thing, who is given a frail form and halting speech patterns. It’s also a masterclass in pacing with Cloonan and Conrad getting to the emotional breaking point before hitting that “To Be Continued” with literal tears streaming in the last panel that Bartel draws.

Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1

The second story in Immortal Woman #1 is written by LL McKinney with art from Alitha Martinez, Mark Morales, and Emilio Lopez, is set earlier in the Future State timeline, and features Nubia, an Amazon who has taken up the mantle of Wonder Woman while an off-panel Diana is queen of Themiscyra. Like the lead story, its plot has a world-ending conflict as Grail, the daughter of Darkseid, is stealing parts of an artifact connected to various gods that if put together could rip a hole in time and space. Most of this is explained in many expository text boxes by McKinney, who seems to be trying to fit a 4-6 issue miniseries in two issues.

A feeling of being overstuffed aside, “Nubia” is not without its charms. Martinez and Morales are veteran storytellers, who excel at everything from an exciting bout of close quarters combat between Grail and Nubia with a poster-worthy splash of the protagonist saying, “I am Wonder Woman” to capturing Nubia’s pained facial expressions when Aunt Nancy asks her for a favor in return for helping her solve the mystery behind these artifact thefts. Speaking of Aunt Nancy, McKinney’s background writing YA urban fantasy comes in handy with some of the little world-building touches like having her run a night club called the Ebony Web with a spider on the door and with a (quite handsome) minotaur bouncer. With her punnish name, knowledge of almost everything, and propensity for single malt whisky, Aunt Nancy has a lot of personality and would be an intriguing permanent edition to Nubia’s supporting cast, or the Wonder Woman side of the DC Universe as it’s good to see a god from West African folklore pop up. Also, I think this might be the first time that the wonderful city of Atlanta has popped up in a DC comic that I’ve read.

However, Nubia’s heroism and Aunt Nancy’s charisma don’t completely make up for a story that is mostly telling and not showing with L.L. McKinney basically undercutting the two page vision that Alitha Martinez and Mark Morales draw earlier in the story by explaining it all in a wall of text. On more of a new reader front, she also doesn’t really introduce Grail except that’s she strong (By defeating Nubia in combat.), generically evil, and wants the artifacts. If I hadn’t (unfortunately) read Geoff Johns’ Justice League run, I wouldn’t know that she was Darkseid’s daughter and basically the Anti-Life version of Wonder Woman. I mean, this is the comic book equivalent of a two episode mini Big Bad arc on a CW show so we don’t need a super deep villain, but including this context could deepen the threat against Nubia and reality. I really wanted to like the Nubia story and look forward to McKinney’s graphic novel take on the character, but it was disappointed and definitely felt like a first published comic.

Overall, Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1 has one strong, epic story and another story with potential that it doesn’t fully live up to that also shows the difficulty of transitioning from prose fiction to comics. However, this book is definitely worth picking up for Jen Bartel’s career best take on the final battle between good and evil in the DC Universe with punches that make galaxies trembles and facial expressions that will make you tear up while Becky Cloonan and Michael W. Conrad write a Diana, who is trying to cling onto hope in an utterly no-win situation.

Story: Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad, L.L. McKinney
Art: Jen Bartel, Alitha Martinez with Mark Morales
Colors: Jen Bartel, Emilio Lopez
Letterer: Pat Brosseau, Becca Carey
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.4 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Christian Cooper, Alitha E. Martinez, Mark Morales, Emilio Lopez, and Rob Clark Jr. Launch Represent! from DC

Represent!

DC has announced a new digital-first series, Represent!, launching with “It’s a Bird” by Christian Cooper, Alitha E. Martinez, Mark Morales, Emilio Lopez, and Rob Clark Jr. This first chapter is available now, offered for free on participating digital platforms including readdc.com, Comixology, Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, and more. Additional chapters of Represent! will be available digitally in 2021.

In the announcement executive editor, Marie Javins said the digital series will showcase and introduce creators traditionally underrepresented in the mainstream comic book medium. “It’s a Bird” is a semi-fictionalized account of Christian’s very real evolution from a kid with a pair of binoculars to a man in an unexpected media spotlight after an altercation with a woman walking her dog in Central Park.

In Cooper and Martinez’s story, Jules, a Black teenager, is given a pair of old binoculars as he heads out for a morning of bird-watching.

For those inspired by the comic, already involved, or want to get involved in positive change, there are many organizations—including Color of ChangeEqual Justice InitiativeNAACP Legal Defense & Educational FundNational Center for Civil and Human RightsNational Urban League, and the Bail Project—working to advance social justice and civil rights in support of #BlackLivesMatter.

It’s Batman the Adventures Continue and Thor Meets Fortnite and More in Today’s Digital Releases

ComiXology has your digital hookup today and that includes a surprise Fortnite and Marvel crossover digital comic! Check out all of what you can get here or the individual issues below.

Batman: The Adventures Continue (2020-) #11

Written by Alan Burnett, Paul Dini
Pencils Ty Templeton
Inks Ty Templeton
Colored by Monica Kubina
Cover by Emilio Lopez, Khary Randolph
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Batman’s clash with Jason Todd continues as he hunts for information on his former boy wonder. Meanwhile, Alfred recounts Jason’s last days as Robin to Tim.

Batman: The Adventures Continue (2020-) #11

Fortnite x Marvel – Nexus War: Thor #1

Written by Donny Cates
Art by Greg Land
Cover by Greg Land
PurchaseArabicBrazilian PortugueseFrenchGermanItalianJapaneseKoreanPolishRussianSimplified ChineseSpanish European – CastilianSpanish Latin AmericaTraditional ChineseTurkish

Galactus, the Devourer of Worlds, is on a mission to consume the universe’s most powerful energy sources. Thor, the King of Asgard, has reluctantly agreed to serve as Galactus’s herald in order to stave off an even greater threat. But when the two discover an extremely powerful, mysterious source of energy known as the Zero Point, it will take more than the mighty Thor to save reality from Galactus’s deadly conquest! Prepare for an epic battle that will shake the foundations of the Marvel Universe and Fortnite!

Fortnite x Marvel - Nexus War: Thor #1

A Marriage Fit For A Sinner

Written by Maya Blake
Art by Rie Nakamura
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In order to save the Pennington family from financial ruin, Eva reluctantly agrees to an arranged marriage. But on the night of the engagement announcement, a helicopter lands and out climbs Zaccheo Giordano, the man Eva’s father framed and imprisoned. The first step in Zaccheo’s plan for revenge after finally regaining his freedom is the ruin of his former lover Eva. He steals a kiss from her right in front of everyone, including her fiancé, and carries her away!

A Marriage Fit For A Sinner

The Bedroom Business

Written by Sandra Myles
Art by Kanako Uesugi
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Investment broker Jake McBride lacks nothing when it comes to women and money. He is very open about the fact that his dates are nothing serious and that he’ll never have a lasting relationship. That’s why he’s never thought of his secretary, Emily, as anything more than a talented but slightly plain and uninteresting little sparrow. But when he sees a man ask her out, he gets irritated for some reason. Suddenly wanting to be closer to her, Jake becomes an instructor in love for innocent and shy Emily. He teaches her about clothes, shoes, hairstyles…and even how to kiss!

The Bedroom Business

Spider-Man by Mark Millar Ultimate Collection

Written by Mark Millar
Art by Frank Cho, Terry Dodson
Cover by Terry Dodson
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Collects Marvel Knights Spider-Man #1-12.

Peter Parker’s worst nightmare has come true: One ofSpider-Man’s enemies has learned his secret identity and is using that knowledge to strike at Peter’s family. Now, his Aunt May has been kidnapped — and his wife, Mary Jane, may be next. Forced into a personal battle against a mysterious foe devious enough to ensnare him in a vicious game of cat-and-mouse, Spider-Man must battle more than a dozen of his deadliest enemies to rescue his aunt. With the clock rapidly ticking down, will Spider-Man earn his greatest triumph or suffer his greatest defeat? In a spellbinding story superbly illustrated by fan-favorite artists Terry Dodson and Frank Cho, best-selling writer Mark Millar presents his definitive take on Marvel’s greatest hero — reinterpreting classic Spider-Man foes such as Dr. Octopus and the Vulture, and introducing an all-new Venom!

Spider-Man by Mark Millar Ultimate Collection

Spider-Man And Power Pack: Big-City Super Heroes

Written by Marc Sumerak
Art by Gurihiru
Cover by Gurihiru
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Collects Spider-Man And Power Pack #1-4.

Zero-G! Lightspeed! Mass Master! Energizer! Together, they are Marvel’s youngest super heroes: Power Pack! When the Power family returns to New York for another exciting adventure, it isn’t long before our super siblings find themselves fighting side-by-side with everyone’s favorite wall-crawler, the Amazing Spider-Man! Featuring the villainy of Venom, the Sandman, the Vulture and more!

Spider-Man And Power Pack: Big-City Super Heroes

Spider-Man And The Fantastic Four: Silver Rage

Written by Jeff Parker
Art by Mike Wieringo
Cover by Mike Wieringo
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Collects Spider-Man/Fantastic Four #1-4.

Two great tastes that taste great together! The world’s greatest super hero and the world’s greatest super team collide for an adventure set nowhere near a Civil War (and upon which we will not put a CIVIL WAR tie-in label)! After a visit by the Impossible Man, your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man is faced with a dangerous new alien threat for which he has only one recourse…call in the Fantastic Four. Separately, Spidey and the FF are the foundation of the Marvel Universe. Together…they just may save it!

Spider-Man And The Fantastic Four: Silver Rage

Spider-Man Family: Back In Black

Written by Sean McKeever, Paul Tobin, Fred Van Lente
Art by Pierre Alary, Terrell Bobbett, Leonard Kirk
Cover by Marcelo Di Chiara
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Collects Spider-Man Family (2007) #1-3.

The action begins with a feature-length tale starring Spider-Man’s alien costume and guest-starring the Sandman! Peter Parker would love nothing more than to get a good night’s sleep, but his sleek, symbiotic suit has plans of its own…and no one is gonna get in its way! Next, Venom is back in town, and he’s on a rampage…but it has nothing to do with his vendetta against Spidey? What could be so important that Venom doesn’t have the time to torture his nemesis? Peter Parker is determined to find out, but first he’ll have to match journalistic wits with none other than Eddie Brock! And finally, remember back in the day, when super heroes would fight other super heroes? What? That still happens? Civil…what? Well, ANYway…we’re taking you back in time, when Spidey was pretty new at all this super hero stuff, and would make silly mistakes, like, oh, say…knocking out the Invisible Girl! I think her friends might want to have a talk with the web-crawler. Plus: backup stories featuring the Lizard and TWO Scorpions!

Spider-Man Family: Back In Black

Spider-Girl Presents Wild Thing: Crash Course

Written by Larry Hama
Art by Ron Lim
Cover by Ron Lim
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Collects Wild Thing #0-5.

Daddy’s little girl, just like dear old Mom: The daughter of Wolverine and Elektra! A few years in the future, Wild Thing has to fight like there’s no tomorrow against demons, droids and desperados! Guest-starring Wolverine, Elektra and Jubilee of the X-People!

Spider-Girl Presents Wild Thing: Crash Course

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