Tag Archives: eliot rahal

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Quantum And Woody #12

QW2017_012_COVER-B-(EXTREME-ULTRA-FOIL)_SHAWThe major leagues are calling!

Now that Eric and Woody Henderson know they have what it takes to save the day, they finally have a shot at going pro – and they’re in luck, because UNITY might just be making a comeback! But the brothers aren’t ready for primetime just yet…they still have to audition for their spots, under the watchful eyes of G.A.T.E. and X-O Manowar!

Look, I won’t try to deny I am genuinely saddened that this is the final issue of Eliot Rahal‘s run on Quantum And Woody, let alone that it’s also the final issue of the current series for the two Henderson brothers. But I’m at least happy to see the series go out on a high note. A very high note. High enough to shatter the glass in your hand, if you want to take the analogy a little farther.

Francis Portella‘s art is coloured by Andrew Dalhouse, and captures Rahal’s swan song story with ease. With the story focusing on the brothers’ heavily encouraged audition for Unity, Valiant’s premier superhuman team, the story focuses on X-O Manowar putting Quantum and Woody through their paces in an amazingly understated work of art. Portella’s work here is super clean and easy to read, his judicious use of blank space an effective way of highlighting the emotional turmoil and internal conflict of certain characters within the comic. The grid work and panel layout are as simplistic and exciting as you would hope – often in the same dynamically constructed page. There are splash pages, traditional grids and enough eye catching imagery to give the reader a spectacular experience.

Yes, it’s the final issue, but I’m still trying to be vague so as to avoid spoilers for those wanting to go into the comic blind.

Somehow, with the last issue of the series, Eliot Rahal has demonstrated his amazing knack for getting into a character’s head and using that understanding to deliver some of the best comics you’ll read. He’s done it for Valiant before with the Archer and Armstrong Divinity III tie in, and once again with the finale of Quantum And Woody. Rahal questions what it is to be a hero, and the various shapes of heroism present in a costumed adventurers daily life – do you need to be constantly saving the world to earn your hero badge, or do you need to save somebody’s world? That Rahal is able to question the nature of superheroism whilst giving us a compelling single issue story is perhaps the highlight of the entire twelve issue run. It also has the benefit of being a brilliant introduction to the characters within the comic, which leaves me in a fairly unique position. It doesn’t matter that this is the final issue in the series, because it is such a fine example of comic book creativity it demands to be read by any and all with an interest in the medium.

When it comes to Quantum and Woody Valiant certainly saved the best for the last, and it’s a shame to see the series end on such a brilliant story. All I wanted after finishing this issue was to count down the days to the next issue – but that, ultimately isn’t going to happen. Like I said, it’s a shame.

Story: Eliot Rahal Art: Francis Portella
Colours: Andrew Dalhouse Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.1 Art: 8.8 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Quantum and Woody! (2017) #12

QUANTUM AND WOODY! (2017) #12

Written by ELIOT RAHAL
Art by FRANCIS PORTELA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by AJ JOTHIKUMAR
Cover B (Extreme Ultra-Foil) by GEOFF SHAW
Variant Cover by JIM MAHFOOD
Pre-Order Edition by MATT HORAK

The major leagues are calling!

Now that Eric and Woody Henderson know they have what it takes to save the day, they finally have a shot at going pro – and they’re in luck, because UNITY might just be making a comeback! But the brothers aren’t ready for primetime just yet…they still have to audition for their spots, under the watchful eyes of G.A.T.E. and X-O Manowar!

Start stretching now, ‘cuz you don’t want to pull a muscle when rising star writer Eliot Rahal (The Paybacks) and fan-favorite artist Francis Portela (FAITH) begin tryouts for the biggest and best superhero team around in this sensational one-shot finale!

$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On Sale NOVEMBER 21nd

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Quantum & Woody #11

QW2017_011_COVER-B-(EXTREME-ULTRA-FOIL)_SHAWQuantum and Woody are having a pretty terrible day so far – their atoms were dissolved in the middle of a nationwide disaster; they faced down their personal demons in “The Otherverse;” and now they’re responsible for bringing a malicious entity back with them! These guys can’t even finish a jigsaw puzzle without losing a whole bunch of pieces – how are they gonna put all of reality back together?

The basic set up for this issue is that Quantum and Woody have to save the world because the real heroes are unavailable. Eliot Rahal doesn’t hide the fact that neither Henderson brother is particularly sought after in the hero circles. His conveyance of this message is both overt and subtle. The obvious is done through the dialogue surrounding the brothers, from Colonel Jamie Capshaw and other G.A.T.E. officers, where as the subtle is in the wonderfully lettered interludes curtesy of Dave Sharpe and through Joe Eisma‘s art. The brothers never really feel like they’re going to be enough to tackle the threat, and yet we still root for them. It’s within this underdog tone that Rahal has created one of the most compelling runs in a comic series I’ve read in a long time.

Quantum & Woody #11 is one of those comics that you can, sort of, just pick up and enjoy with minimal confusion (the recap page that Valiant open the story with will more than help you here), but if you’ve been reading the book since Rahal took over then it’s an issue that rewards you with some brilliant moments in comics. It may sound like hyperbole, but this issue had me grinning from ear to ear as the brothers found a determination that I’ve seldom seen from both of them (granted my Quantum and Woody knowledge isn’t the best). There were also other emotions felt, but the less said about that the better (because spoilers, not because I want to hide that I have emotions).

What we’re given with this comic is an issue that pokes fun at itself and the title characters whilst simultaneously providing an excellent example of the type of super hero comics that will hit you right in the warm spot. That spot that triggers a really satisfied and complete feeling from you when you read or listen or watch something that moves you. Because this comic did that for me.

Ultimately with only one issue left in the series (and that issue being a one-shot story), Rahal is on pace to end his tenure with the Henderson’s on a high note. A very high note.

Story: Eliot Rahal Artist: Joe Eisma
Colours: Andrew Dalhouse Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.2 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.1 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Quantum and Woody! (2017) #11

QUANTUM AND WOODY! (2017) #11

Written by ELIOT RAHAL
Art by JOE EISMA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by KYLE SMART
Cover B (Extreme Ultra-Foil) by GEOFF SHAW
Interlocking Variant by JOE EISMA
Pre-Order Edition by RYAN LEE
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On Sale OCTOBER 17th

Situation Normal All Klanged Up!

Quantum and Woody are having a pretty terrible day so far – their atoms were dissolved in the middle of a nationwide disaster; they faced down their personal demons in “The Otherverse;” and now they’re responsible for bringing a malicious entity back with them! These guys can’t even finish a jigsaw puzzle without losing a whole bunch of pieces – how are they gonna put all of reality back together?

Rising star Eliot Rahal (The Paybacks) and Eisner-nominated artist Joe Eisma (Morning Glories) give the world’s worst superhero team some much-needed closure as SEPARATION ANXIETY draws the two brothers closer than ever before!

Review: Quantum And Woody #10

QW2017_010_COVER-A_SMARTWhen most people go on a journey, they bring back a souvenir…but most people usually stick to t-shirts and keychains, not unearthly creatures like the ones Quantum and Woody brought back from the “Otherverse”! Now, a giant monster is wreaking havoc on Washington D.C., and another anomaly – known only as “The Screaming Man” – is slowly getting acquainted with our reality. Is the world’s worst superhero team going to do anything about it? Hopefully, or this would be a really weird comic!

I have really been enjoying Quantum And Woody since Eliot Rahal took over the scripting duties on the comic, and it wouldn’t be too far of a stretch to say that this has become one of my most antcipated comics each month.

This issue has the brothers facing off against what is basically Godzilla, and as they aren’t exactly the biggest powerhouses in the Valiant universe we get some inventive uses of their powers as they come to save the day. It’s moments like these that Rahal shines; he isn’t writing in way that tries to be funny (or at least it doesn’t come across that way), but rather he’s got an effortless way of bringing humour into the book without ever making it the focal point – but that won’t stop you from having a good chuckle all the way through. Quantum And Woody #10 captures the essence of a what we remember early Marvel comics to be; fun, with decidedly subtle (or not so subtle) undertones that you may or may not pick up on.

Rahal questions reality in this book, and how one’s perspectives can change based on what you are and are not aware of. And he does this while showing that even the worst of us can be heroes, no matter who writes you off as useless – which seems to be an underlying theme of the series since Rahal has taken over. Maybe that’s why I love this issue so much, or maybe I’m over thinking things. I suppose it depends on my perspective, eh?

Story: Eliot Rahal Art: Joe Eisma
Colours: Andrew Dalhouse Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.9 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Quantum and Woody! (2017) #10

QUANTUM AND WOODY! (2017) #10

Written by ELIOT RAHAL
Art by JOE EISMA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by KYLE SMART
Cover B (Extreme Ultra-Foil) by GEOFF SHAW
Interlocking Variant by JOE EISMA
Pre-Order Edition by PAULINA GANUCHEAU
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On Sale SEPTEMBER 19th

When most people go on a journey, they bring back a souvenir…but most people usually stick to t-shirts and keychains, not unearthly creatures like the ones Quantum and Woody brought back from the “Otherverse”! Now, a giant monster is wreaking havoc on Washington D.C., and another anomaly – known only as “The Screaming Man” – is slowly getting acquainted with our reality. Is the world’s worst superhero team going to do anything about it? Hopefully, or this would be a really weird comic!

Red-hot writer Eliot Rahal (The Paybacks) and Eisner-nominated artist Joe Eisma (Archie) attach themselves to the underdogs of the Valiant Universe as “SEPARATION ANXIETY” reaches new heights!

Review: Quantum & Woody #9

QW2017_009_COVER-A_FOWLERFor Eric and Woody Henderson – adopted brothers, partners, and the erstwhile superhero twosome known as Quantum and Woody – the world has just turned upside down! Usually, they can’t stand to be near one another… Now, they literally can’t be – or their powers go on the fritz! That definitely makes being a “duo” difficult, especially when a perilous new threat is teaching you just how bad you are at superhero-ing solo!

Look, I’m going to dispense with the usual review blabber, and just straight up tell you that this is a book that you’re going to enjoy. There’s something here for everybody, of any kind of superhero persuasion, and it’s all done with a remarkable smoothness and accessibility. You like the overly complicated alternate dimension stuff? Great, Quantum and Woody have just returned from an alternate dimension they went too after they died, along with Quantum’s wife and a mysterious Other, and now the brothers Henderson  have two sets of conflicting memories that they are dealing with in totally different ways – one of which, oddly, is kind of sensible. You like the street level stuff with a hero trying to save something important to him? Check. You’d rather a city ending threat? Check. You’d rather see two heroes going about their daily business? Check.

Emotional drama? Yup. Comedy? Of course.

There are a lot of reasons why this book should feel like a disjointed mess, but only one why it doesn’t: Eliot Rahal. The writer dangles numerous different threads and plot devices in front of you without ever seeming like he has lost control or that they’ve been forced into the story. Quantum & Woody #9 feels like a love letter to whatever your favourite part of the superhero genre it represents with a story that is surprisingly deep with its underlying core questions: how do superheroes deal with the reality altering trauma? Why are they any more prepared to ace something like this than your average Joe?

Speaking of Joe’s, Joe Eisma has a style and pinach about him this issue that couldn’t be more in sync with the story had it been written and drawn by the same person.

Quantum & Woody was  a good series in the hands of its first creative team, but with Rahal spearheading the direction now, the series is dangerously close to becoming one of my favourite Valiant series.

Story: Eliot Rahal Art: Joe Eisma Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.3 Art: 8.8 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

It’s Comics Comics from Starburns Industries Press on Kickstarter

Starburns Industries Press has launched a Kickstarter for their Comics Comics anthology which is completely written by stand-up comedians.

Backer rewards include the comic in print and digital, two Kickstarter exclusive editions, Starburns swag, our other comics, retailer tiers, and even a tour of the studio that produces Rick and Morty, HarmonQuest, and Animals.

Comics Comics is an ongoing collection of original stories with each issue containing at least 48 pages of brand-new stories written by headliners, cult favorites, and newcomers drawn by artists from every corner of the comics world.

Comics Comics features such voices as Patton Oswalt (MST3KHappy!), Paul Scheer (How Did This Get Made?The League), Sam Jay (SNL), Jackie Kashian (The Dork Forest), Quinta Brunson (BrokeUp for Adoption), Megan Koester (Coming to the Stage, Corporate), Sara Benincasa (Real Artists Have Day Jobs), Carolyn Main (Pitch, Please!), Eliot Rahal (New Comic Book Day), Rose Matafeo (Funny Girls), Nick Giovannetti (Bad Guys), with more announced throughout the campaign.

The comedians have the freedom to write whatever they want in any genre resulting in comics featuring slices of life, flights of fancy, and journeys into genre.

Teaming up to make these stories into comics are such comedy fans as Troy Nixey (Vinegar TeethThe Black Sinister), Robert Hack (Chilling Tales of Sabrina), Evan Dorkin (Milk and CheeseBill and Ted’s Excellent Comic Book), Rick Altergott (ViceCracked), Brent Schoonover (Gregory Graves), Sarah Burrini (Nerd Girl), and more, with double threats like comedian/cartoonist Carolyn Main writing and drawing! A set of Kickstarter-exclusive covers are painted by cartoonist and HBO artist Richard P. Clark (The BoysHouse of Gold & Bones).

The Comics Comics Kickstarter runs through September 19. Backers can get copies of the comic in print and digital, an exclusive hardcover version, prints, and more.

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