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Preview: Red Sonja: The Complete Gail Simone Omnibus

Red Sonja: The Complete Gail Simone Omnibus

writer: Gail Simone
artist: Walter Geovani, Jack Jadson
cover: Jenny Frison
FC | 528 pages | Standard Edition: $49.99 | Signed Edition: $75.00
Action/Adventure | Teen+

Collects all of Gail Simone’s amazing work on Red Sonja (Issues #0-#18, Volume 2) in one beautiful oversized volume.

Gail Simone (Batgirl, Birds of Prey) gives the iconic fantasy heroine a fresh new attitude! Red Sonja, the She-Devil with a Sword, intends to pay back a blood debt owed to the one man who has gained her respect… even if it means leading a doomed army to their certain deaths! Who is Dark Annisia, and how has this fearsome warrior accomplished what no god nor demon has been able to do: force Sonja to her knees in surrender? An epic tale of blood, lust, and vengeance, Queen of the Plagues takes Red Sonja from the depths of her own grave to the heights of battlefield glory.

Red Sonja: The Complete Gail Simone Omnibus

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 4/20

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

Oliver #3 (Image)** – An action-centric issue from Gary Whitta and Darick Robertson that doesn’t offer much by way of story or character development aside from our protagonist naturally stepping into a “heroic” or “leadership” role, but damn — what a visual storytelling clinic this is! The project’s origins as a screenplay are readily apparent as this is a very cinematic installment, and who knows? Maybe a movie might happen yet. Until then, we’ve got a gorgeous series of storyboards here to “oohh” and “aahh” over, don’t we? Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Black Badge #9 (Boom! Studios)** – A fun issue from Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins that takes us back to late-Cold War East Berlin before segueing back to the present day, the two segments joined by an event that will apparently have big repercussions. Can’t say enough about the art and colors on this series, it really fits the story to a proverbial “T” and makes even “side-step” chapters like this one well worth your time and money. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Batman #69 (DC)** So that’s it for the “Knightmares” storyline, huh? In with a whimper and out with much the same, this is arguably the weakest of a weak bunch, the Bat/Cat stuff coming across as way more flat and emotionless that writer Tom King apparently thinks it is, and Yanick Paquette turning in an uncharacteristically rushed-looking job on the art. Whatever comes next surely can’t be worse than this — can it? Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass

Meet The Skrulls #3 (Marvel)** – Family secrets from the past come to the fore and old wounds are re-opened in Robbie Thompson’s lightning-paced script for this issue, and Nico Henrichon’s art is getting more individualistic and distinctive with each passing month. Could this be the long-awaited successor to “The Vision” in terms of “prestige” Marvel projects? It sure seems like it might be. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

War Of The Realms: Punisher #1 (Marvel) In what plays out like Frank Castle in ” Assault On Precinct 13″, plus monsters is a fun debut issue. As we find Punisher having to defend the city by himself, as the Avengers are otherwise engaged. As the Dark Elves and Frost Giants have invaded the city and Frank has to get creative in order to defend the city and see tomorrow. By issue’s end, he somehow pulls the city together, and gained some allies but the fight is far from over. Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars Age of Rebellion Special (Marvel)– We get three distinct Tales with 3 different creative teams. In the first story,” The Long Game”, we find IG-88, the robotic bounty hunter, as the reader finds out how he possesses bloodlust. In ” The Trial Of Dagobah”, we find Yoda as he is going stir crazy in exile alone until fate gives him a young Jedi to train whose last name just so happens to be Skywalker. In ” Stolen Valor” Biggs Darklighter and Jek Porkins go on vacation and find trouble hidden in paradise. Overall, an entertaining collection of stories which shows when you have superfans create stories like these, their love for the source material certainly shines through. Overall: 9.4 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars TIE Fighter #1(Marvel)- We meet the pilots of Shadow Wing, the Empire’s elite fighter Squadron and who Vader believes can put down the Rebellion. As we meet each pilot, we find out just how much they’re like the rebels, just fighting for the Dark Side. As they soon hear whispers of some Intel of Rebellion fighters close by. By issue’s end, the Intel proves to be incorrect, it’s worse than they thought. Overall: 9.4 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Mary Shelley, Monster Hunter #1 (Aftershock)– Adam Glass, Olivia Cuartero-Briggs, and Hayden Sherman combine Gothic horror with alternate history and a side of progressive feminism in Mary Shelley, Monster Hunter. The story is told from Mary’s POV as she believes she has a purpose beyond being the mother of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s child. An opportunity arises in a horror story writing contest, but then Gothic fiction becomes her new status quo. Glass and Cuartero-Brigg write a lovely pastiche of Universal Horror and the legends of Byron, the Shelleys, and Claire Clairmont’s journeys while Sherman has a scratchy horror style with strong reds and blacks in the color palette. The character movements and expression could be clearer though. Overall: 7.8 Verdict: Read

Spider-Man Life Story #2 (Marvel)– It’s the 1970s where Peter Parker works for Reed Richards’ Future Foundation, his wife Gwen Stacy works for the kinda creepy Miles Warren, and Mary Jane and Harry Osborn (who has a drug problem) are married. Mark Bagley still has his classic weakness of drawing women looking the same, but he and Chip Zdarsky tell a heart rending story of how Peter wallows in guilt because he feels he is responsible for both the death of Uncle Ben and Flash Thompson in Vietnam. He also lets ethical dilemmas get in the way of him being a great scientist and has some interesting conversations with Reed. Also, Zdarsky and Bagley pull off the Clone Saga somehow in this issue, and it makes sense and has high emotional stakes. I also liked the scene where Mary Jane calls out Peter’s bullshit before doing a disco DJ set. Zdarsky, Bagley, inker Drew Hennessy, and colorist Frank D’Armata soak up the drama in Peter Parker’s personal life to create a compelling second issue even if it’s not as visually interesting as #1. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Buffy the Vampire Slayer #4 (BOOM!)– Jordie Bellaire and Dan Mora have done an excellent job differentiating this new reboot of Buffy from the original TV show, and it continues in issue 4 when Giles tells Buffy and the Scoobies to take a night off from slaying and training. This comic also focuses on Xander a little bit, who is probably the Buffy characters that has aged the least well as a “nice guy”. Bellaire and Mora go deep into his feelings of being left out and why he could potentially go “dark”, and it’s refreshing to him not written as a self-insert character. Another throughline in this episode is the idea of lying to people we care about from Buffy not letting her mom know about her being the Slayer to Willow, who is openly lesbian and kicks ass at magic and combat, not telling her girlfriend Rose. It’s a weakness that could definitely be exploited by this arc’s Big Bad. And yeah, this comic gets so much right from skipping the boring Master and making Spike and Drusilla the main villains to having modernist vampire Spike be adept and texting and yeah, the final page. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 4/13

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

Wonder Twins #3 (DC/Wonder Comics)** – As ever, Mark Russell keeps it topical and relevant in this examination of the backstory of Gleek the monkey, and Stephen Byrne’s art is competent and functional, if not exactly remarkable. Possibly the weakest issue to date, but still better than 95% of what’s out there. Definitely an enjoyable comic any way you slice it. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Batman #68 (DC) **– Amanda Conner does superb work on this one, as is her custom, but Tom King is back in “pointless run-around territory” in this lame “Knightmares” installment that features Batman imagining a bachelor “party” with Clark Kent that may or may not have been, while Catwoman and Lois Lane have a lot more fun than the guys at the Fortress of Solitude. Nothing special whatsoever, and the running-in-place this purportedly “major” arc is engaging in is really getting annoying at this point. Overall: 4 Recommendation: Pass

Detective Comics #1001 (DC) **– The new storyline “teased” in issue #1000 proves to be no more inspiring now that it’s underway than the little into hinted it would be. Dead bats all over Gotham — so what? Which is a fair summation of Peter J. Tomasi’s script in total. Brad Walker and Andrew Hennessy’s art is fine, but only that. Overall: 3.5 Recommendation: Pass

Invaders #4 (Marvel) **– Talk about a let-down, all the mysterious hints about Namor’s secret past are revealed here and — it ain’t much. To put it kindly. Chip Zdarsky had been crafting some fairly compelling scripts prior to this; let’s hope he gets back on track. The art tandem of Carlos Magno and Butch Guice continue to turn in strong work and each complements the other nicely, but that’s about all I can say in this issue’s favor. Overall: 4 Recommendation: Pass

Shean

Age of Conan: Belit #2 (Marvel) In this sequel, Belit comes into her own, taking control of the ship. As she is the only one that possesses the know how to subdue the monster. She leads the crew while drawing dissentions in the ranks. By issue’s end, they reached their destination, but only faces even more atrocities when they arrived. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars: Age of Rebellion: Grand Moff Tarkin#1(Marvel)-In what is a revealing examination of a polarizing character, we find out about Tarkin in a way concise could only convey.As we find about his family life as well as some key scenes that happened in and around the first few movies. As we see his heavy hand as a leader as well as his brutishness when he gets challenged. By issue’s end, the reader finally gets why he was such a formidable and respected leader. Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars Age of Rebellion: Princess Leia#1 (Marvel) I will keep this one sweet and short. As much as I loved all these characters, it was hard to love this story. As this is a solid like only for Karl Story’s art who looks like their actor counterparts featured many of the characters who will be on Episode IX, so this comic serves as simply filler. Overall: 6.6 Recommendation: Borrow

Logan

Infinite Dark #5 (Image/Top Cow) Ryan Cady and Andrea Mutti’s existentialist, end of the world sci-fi saga continues in Infinite Dark #5, which reintroduces the characters and new status quo. Apparently, there’s a lot of unrest among the inhabitants of the not so good ship Orpheus, but this is mostly told via exposition and not shown. However, Mutti and colorist K. Michael Russell craft gritty sequences with an orange palette featuring Deva, the protagonist, teaming up with her old enemy to take down an even more horrific threat. And yeah, this book is straight up horor at the end. Overall: 7 Verdict: Read

Symbiote Spider-Man #1 (Marvel)– Peter David and Greg Land are trying to do some kind of Pulp Fiction non-linear crime narrative meets Kraven’s Last Hunt story with Mysterio and Spider-Man while adding a romantic subplot with Black Cat. (Oops, Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada already did Kraven’s Last Hunt with Mysterio in Daredevil: Guardian Devil.) The quality of the book really fluctuates from clever lines from David about the Power Pack beating Mysterio to generic black suit angst and weak attempts at flirting. This fluctuation continues to the visual department where Land’s weaknesses at faces continues with lots of stiffness for the female characters and a swipe of George W Bush by Bryan Hitch for one of the male ones. He does a good job any time the black suit is in action, but it’s more of a spandex costume and less of a fluid organism in his pencil and Jay Leisten’s inks. If you’re looking for a throwback Spider-Man story, then Chip Zdarsky and Mark Bagley’s Spider-Man: Life Story is much better option. Overall: 5 Verdict: Pass

Faithless #1 (BOOM!)– Brian Azzarello dips his toe into the world of romance comics with artist Maria Llovet, and the results are pretty fucked up. His good ear for dialogue combined with smooth, sleazy art from Llovet as Faith and Poppy wander around town, day drink, shoot the shit about magic, watch Poppy’s ex boyfriend become street pizza, and of course, end up in bed. Until the last possible moment, Faithless is in no rush to be some kind of plot driven thriller and feels out how Faith and Poppy look at each other, chat, and connect. Faith is a seriously flawed protagonist with money issues, an obsession with magic, and a self centered side, but she’s relatable too. Until the final page when this becomes a much different comic. Overall: 8 Verdict: Buy

Wonder Twins #3 (DC/Wonder Comics) Mark Russell and Stephen Byrne dig into Gleek’s (the Wonder Twins’ pet monkey) tragic past as Sir Lance-little as his poor self has some traveling circus-induced PTSD. This issue also has their climactic battle against the League of Annoyance and some damn great moments between Superman and Jayna. Byrne’s art is smooth and makes for an enjoyable reading appearance as he plays the weird nature of the Wonder Twins’ powers straight instead of spoofing them. The colorful comedy mostly comes from their enemies, and he and Russell hit some strong emotional beats every time Gleek’s past shows up, or Superman gives Jayna advice about being an alien hero on Earth. This comic really hits the right balance between silly and serious, episodic and serialized. Overall: 7.8 Verdict: Read

Joe Ryan

The Amazing Spider-Man #19 (Marvel) – I have enjoyed Spencer, Ramos, and company on Hunted for the most part so far. It has been a fast paced and fun mini-event that has been a bit better than I expected. I enjoyed the Gibbon issue quite a lot, and this was a decent follow up. It took a bit to get there, but by the end of the book left it at a solid point. Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Buy

Web of Venom: Cult of Carnage #1 (Marvel) – This book took me a few pages to get into it, but it finally got it hooks into me. It is a solid set up to what will be a big Absolute Carnage event, and it was good to see John Jameson/Man Wolf front and center in the main characters role, complete with a major part by Misty Knight. I enjoyed the art, though it is cartoony for such a mature title, it worked, and the set up at the end was exciting. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

 Age of X-Man: Marvelous X-Men #3 (Marvel) – I like the idea of this event, and enjoyed some of the earlier issues, but I think it is moving far too slow for how many series it has going on at once. We are 3 issues into this comic, and things are starting to move. The art is solid, and it isn’t bad by any means, I just want it to go somewhere. Uncanny by Rosenberg, and the excitement behind Hickman on X-Men is where my X-Fandom thoughts are, and I am mostly wanting to see how this wraps up. Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Dtective Comics #1001 (DC) – With the big anniversary issue, we got a glimpse of The Arkham Knight in #1000, but this book gives us a little more as it kicks off the arc. Tomasi does a good job quickly moving us through the big set up, action, and cliffhanger ending. I am excited to see where this story goes, and at this point feel like I have changed my mind on whom The Arkham Knight is. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Batman Who Laughs #4 (DC) – This was the best issue I read of the big publishers this week, and it really made me miss Scott Snyder on Batman. I am kind of sad this is a mini, because I love Snyder and Capullo on Batman on The New 52. That being said, there is a lot of wacky story in these few issues, and if you like over the top Batman in that style, this book delivers. Between this and Detective, the main Batman book is falling behind both of them in quality in my opinion. Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 4/6

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

Female Furies #3 (DC)** – Another superb issue from Cecil Castellucci and Adriana Melo, but a decidedly harrowing one as one of our principal characters meets a grisly and disturbing end that puts a dramatic exclamation point on her already-tragic circumstances. It’s time for the ladies to start getting some revenge, please! Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Major X #1 (Marvel)** – A new Rob Liefeld comic? I couldn’t resist. All in all it’s about what you’d expect, albeit slightly more competent on the scripting front. I dunno, I really don’t care about the title character, nor Cable, nor Deadpool — but if you’re into any or all of them, this might be up your alley. Certainly not bad for what it is, but “what it is” only goes so far, this representing more or less exactly how far that is. Overall: 5 Recommendation: Pass

Black Hammer ’45 #2 (Dark Horse)** – A fun, well-paced WWII aerial combat yarn from Jeff Lemire, Ray Fawkes, Matt Kindt, and Sharlene Kindt that kind of cops out on the previous issue’s cliffhanger but more than makes up for it with a great one at the end this time around — and in between there’s plenty of gorgeous art and a pretty solid script to go along with them. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Black Hammer ’45 #2 (Dark Horse)** – A fun, well-paced WWII aerial combat yarn from Jeff Lemire, Ray Fawkes, Matt Kindt, and Sharlene Kindt that kind of cops out on the previous issue’s cliffhanger but more than makes up for it with a great one at the end this time around — and in between there’s plenty of gorgeous art and a pretty solid script to go along with them. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Major X #1 (Marvel)– I didn’t hate this comic, but I didn’t love it. Rob Liefeld’s plot has all the worst of the 90s, including time travel, interchangeable macho heroes, and Summers family nonsense, and his dialogue reminds you that his best work was when he had a writer like Chris Claremont, Fabian Nicieza, or Alan Moore. However, his art has all the energy of his X-Force days with action scenes featuring Major X, Wolverine, Deadpool, Cable, and M’Koy (A weird ass take on Beast.) being entertaining as hell and well-choreographed. This would be great as a slightly dumb, straightforward action book in the mold of the Fast and the Furious flicks, but Liefeld tries to be a little too clever for his own good. Also, I’m so glad I never have to experience what being in a room with three Deadpools is like. Overall: 6 Recommendation: Pass

 Female Furies #3 (DC)– Cecil Castellucci and Adriana Melo’s story takes a big turn in Female Furies #3 beginning with a visually inventive sequence where the Beautiful Dreamer shows the Furies that there’s a better world beyond Apokolips. There’s dancing, and Scott Free shows up. But the rest of the comic is pure tragedy as not kow-towing to the patriarchy leads to death. After taking a back seat to other characters in the previous two issues, Castellucci and Melo do a fantastic job developing the character of Big Barda as she begins her slow journey from victim blamer and soldier of Darkseid to one of the most badass superheroes in the DC Universe. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy

Marvel Team-Up #1 (Marvel)– In a fun flipbook format, Eve Ewing, Joey Vazquez, and Felipe Sobreiro modernize the classic superhero team-up title in a perfect blend of action and character. Ewing gives both Peter and Kamala an internal conflict and an obvious external one and then lets them cut loose with a twist at the end. She gives them basically the opposite problem, which is Peter is nostalgic for the days of youth whereas Kamala wants to grow up and be free and have responsibilities. It connects with the way that the heroes are written in their solo titles without being too steeped in lore. And Vazquez’s art is sleek, pop art goodness with bursts of color from Sobreiro. Marvel Team-Up #1 has clean art, explosive action, and character exploration. Basically everything I want from a superhero comic in 2019. Overall: 9 Verdict: Buy


Giant Days #49 (BOOM!/BOOM! Box)– Max Sarin makes her triumphant return on art with a little assist from writer John Allison on this Esther-centric issue that opens with hallucinations of a talking bald eagle as she writes her dissertation on the Great American Novel. What follows is a hilarious, very relatable look at returning home, that crossroads time between university and adulthood, and a few shenanigans with her Mini Me Lottie. Esther wants to do anything but write her dissertation and fills the procrastination gaps by small, not melodramatic arguments with her parents and going to the pub and running into exes/Z-list friends. Esther definitely knows she doesn’t want to return to her hometown after uni, but doesn’t really have much of a plan either. Being an eccentric and growing up don’t really fit together. This issue is very wacky and a little sad and is a demonstration of how fleshed out John Allison has made these characters. Also, I love Sarin’s design for Esther’s mom. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Joe Ryan

The War of the Realms #1 (Marvel) – Jason Aaron and Russell Dauterman have been building this for years. I have loved Thor since Aaron has been on the book, including when Jane took over the mantle. It has been entertaining throughout, and this story has been building slowly with Russell Dauterman’s art going somewhat unnoticed by many people I talked to. It is always jaw dropping, and this issue has he and Matt Wilson running a clinic on how to make the most beautiful fantasy comic you may have ever seen. I don’t love the $6 #1 price point, and I think Marvel needs to take a step back and look at the bigger picture when it comes to that, but I am also a realist. Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Immortal Hulk #16 (Marvel) – Al Ewing and Joe Bennett nail suspense so well. I hope they reunite on another book when all is said and done like Lemire/Sorrentino or other great teams have before. I enjoy the twists and turns to this book and just when you think you know what is going on, it smashes you over the head and flips the script. I think when all is said and done, this will be a classic in the Hulk runs. I recommend this book to everyone, even if you haven’t read a Hulk book before. If you have? There are tons of Easter eggs and familiar characters all over. Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Avengers: No Road Home #8 (Marvel) – I have really enjoyed this series quite a bit. It’s a big blockbuster with a surprisingly quick moving and fun story. Zub, Waid and, Ewing are doing a great job juggling the writing duties while not falling over each other. The art by Barberi is solid and the Putri covers are beautiful. The Night Queen and Immortal Hulk moment was especially cool, and Conan actually fits into the story so far. This will read good in trade. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Uncanny X-Men #15 (Marvel) – I really like what Rosenberg is doing with this series so far, and he knows his X-Lore quite well. We get some deep cuts from different eras thrown into the story in some interesting ways. It’s good to have Scott and Loganback, and you can tell they’ve both been through a lot, and while we know that, I feel like Rosenberg handles it in a subtle way that I appreciate. Larocca’s art fits the darker tone well. I look forward to each issue, and at this point this book and the announcement of Hickman returning has made me mostly forget the Age of X-Man event before it even finishes. Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

The Champions #4 (Marvel) – I have been enjoying Zub on the book more than Waid’s run since Zub took over, and this issue continues showing the tension between Miles and Khamala over something I won’t spoil that happened earlier in the series. Cummings does a good job drawing all of the action and the multiple members of the team. I hope the stuff with Sam/Kid Nova goes somewhere fun, because this issue set up something cool there. Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 3/23

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt #3 (Dynamite) **– Forget “Doomsday Clock,” Kieron Gillen and Casper Wijngarrd’s entirely unofficial “Watchmen” sequel is superior in every way, and this issue raises the stakes, includes some terrific (if obvious) “Easter eggs,” and regales us with sleek, stylish art, a pacy script, and one hell of a cliffhanger. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Freedom Fighters #4 (DC)** – This series is turning into my very own slow-motion car wreck, with me in the role of nosy-ass bystander. Robet Venditti sure doesn’t do subtle, as the first page features a Nazi soldier shooting a bald eagle, and it only gets more lame and ridiculous from there, with Uncle Sam rising from the grave in the Alan-Moore-without-the-brains “extradimensional realm of ideas,” while on Earth our heroes blow up the Hitler head on the new Forth Reich version of Mount Rushmore. Eddy Barrows really turns in some nice art, but it’s utterly wasted on this laughably stupid script. Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass. I purchased my copy because I’m a glutton for punishment.

Invaders #3 (Marvel)** – I’m actually really liking this series so far, and this is probably the best issue yet, with the ever-morally-ambiguous Namor’s plans sort of coming into view in Chip Zdarsky’s script while artist Carlos Magno turns in his typical nicely-detailed work. Nothing Earth-shattering is going on here, but it’s competent and involving comic book storytelling that’s worth at least a look, if not four bucks of your money. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

Black Hammer: Age Of Doom #9 (Dark Horse)** – After getting off track a little bit, Jeff Lemire is righting course here in this issue, as our heroes — or a couple of them, at any rate — fight to break free of yet another alternate reality, one in which they’re powerless and amnesiac for the most part. Dean Ormston’s art is, of course, spectacular, and all indications are that this series will be again on the whole quite soon. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

Spider-Man Far From Home Prelude #1(Marvel)** – This book, I really can’t say too much about, as anyone who has watched Spider-Man Homecoming, will definitely have dejavu, as this is a Cliff Notes comic book version of the movie, an almost direct Telegraph of the movie. Either way, it probably what most of us comic book readers hate about comic book adaptations, though story still is decent. Overall: 6.7 Recommendation: Borrow

Joe Ryan

Daredevil #3 (Marvel) – Zdarsky on writing and Checcetto on pencils were meant for this book, and this character. The pacing, and excellent storytelling from Zdarsky are top notch, and the comic is accessible for long time readers or fans of the Netflix show. Checcetto’s panel work is great. It can’t be easy to showcase how Matt senses his foes, but this book nails it in such a unique way, and that is also in part due to Sunny Gho’s excellent color work. Great job all around. I love this book. Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Avengers: No Road Home #7 (Marvel) – This book is a summer blockbuster, and it is a blast. It is a quick but action packed read. Zub, Ewing, and Waid do a great job on the story, and balance the writing duties well. There isn’t a moment where I can tell the writing apart, and its very fluid. The art by Paco Medina and Jesus Aburtov balances the fantastical story somewhere between a classic animated film and traditional comic book well. The covers by Yasmine Putri have been excellent. This is a wild ride, and even with them throwing Conan in, it works, and works well. Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

The Amazing Spider-Man #18 (Marvel) We are already on issue #18? Wow this book has flown by. For the most part, I am enjoying The Hunted arc, and what Nick Spencer is doing with Kraven is different enough to work. Ramos on art gives that familiar Spidey art we know, and it’s good, with his usual proportion defying character models. The event has been entertaining, and I am hoping for a big solid finale, because that is something Spidey events, have been lacking in my opinion. Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Buy

Heroes in Crisis #7 (DC) – This book is often times very controversial, and I am definitely a Tom King fan overall. This story is one that I do believe will be best read collected in trade, as it’s a slow pace, and has a lot of deception going on as far as the storytelling goes. I did like this issue overall, and we got some strong hints something else is going on, and Clay Mann is a beast on art. Especially that Heroes In Crisis spelt in flowers with Wally standing over them. Wow. Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Read In Trade

Detective Comics #1000 (DC) It’s hard to grade an issue like this. It’s really an anthology and a celebration of 80 years of the most famous superhero of all time. But, it costs $10, so I will share my thoughts! The stories in the book are solid overall, with some standouts. There are many covers to pick from, and there are some great ones. I personally love the Jock and Michael Cho covers. The final story which will be the one that continues was a solid tease of The Arkham Knight (from Rocksteady’s game of the same name), and I am definitely hyped for what happens next. Tomasi and Mahnke have done a great job on the series, and I can’t wait to see who is under the mantle this time. I would say to buy this, because it’s the 1000th issue of a comic. That is a crazy feat that DC, and all of these creators should be very proud of. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Bad Luck Chuck #1 (Dark Horse)– Lela Gwenn, Matthew Dow Smith, and Kelly Fitzpatrick turn in an entertaining piece of speculative fiction about a woman named Chuck, who has an artifact that allows her to be a walking disaster. She’s a “cash in the insurance” rabbit’s foot for dozens of laundromats and parents whose kids got into cults all across the country. However, an investigator is finally on her trail (and think she’s a serial arsonist) adding tension to the mix although Gwenn and Smith use the first issue to let Chuck do her thing. Smith and Fitzpatrick’s visuals are very noir, which works for the criminal investigative type plotline and Chuck’s mysterious background. This is definitely the best magical artifact Dark Horse comic since The Mask. Overall: 8 Verdict: Buy

Action Comics #1009(DC)- In the last arc, Brian Michael Bendis crafted a Superman crime story, and in this one, he and Steve Epting are crafting a Superman spy story. They have a little bit of glee having Superman fly around the world connecting dots and give an all too short glimpse at the Question. But the real fun is the interactions between Lois Lane and Amanda Waller aka lots of arguing and even a punch. Bendis and Epting use them to ask the question of who is there to protect the DC Universe when all these secret organizations like ARGUS, the DEO, and Spyral all fry out. Epting’s art is smooth, yet shadowy and sucks all the bright, hopeful parts of Superman out. Also, he gets a chance to draw the dinosaur in the Batcave. This issue, and “Leviathan” in general, is proof that you can tell a dark Superman story without neck snapping and angst; just put him in a genre that he’s not super experienced in. Or is he. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Sabrina The Teenage Witch #1 (Archie)– Kelly Thompson, Veronica Fish, and Andy Fish’s take on Sabrina the Teenage Witch is an occasionally pleasing mix of high school soap opera and current Archie horror. It starts with a horned monster in the woods and then cuts to Salem being grumpy (and talking) and waking Sabrina up. Thompson takes a lot of pages out of the early seasons of Buffy playbook connecting metaphorical monsters to real ones and the temptation of using one’s powers to make high school a little easier. However, there’s some clever and sweet writing here and there like her traditional love interest Harvey seeing her white hair in the sun even though she’s turned it blonde with a glamor. The Fishes’ art is also expressive and suitably dark when horror monsters grow up and gives the cast of character a range of body types, hairstyles, and clothing choices plus a unique color palette whenever magic is used. And the art is the real draw of a story that is really middling monster of the week stuff. Overall: 7 Verdict: Read

Age of X-Man: X-Tremists #2 (Marvel)– On the tin, it’s an alternate universe event tie-in, but in Age of X-Man: X-Tremists #2, Leah Williams, Georges Jeanty, and Roberto Poggi have given readers a full fledged slow burn romance comic. In a world where attachments are forbidden, Blob has strong feelings for Psylocke, and she’s psychic so she knows. Williams gives him a beautiful speech about unrequited love and makes him a three dimensional character, who is basically a rock of of the exercise in bureaucracy that is Department X and also loves books and art. On the other hand, Psylocke thinks she is a good, understanding person, but keeps a pregnant woman in the basement so she can keep up appearances with her superiors, the X-Men. This comic is a giant rush of moral dilemmas and forbidden love and basically all the feels filled parts of X-Men with no filler. I’m still not 100% sold on the art, but Jeanty and Poggi’s facial expressions and character acting are decent. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 2/2

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Shean

Killmonger #4(Marvel)- In the penultimate issue, we see what’s left of the team reunited but not is all what it seems. As Erik tries to convince King to come to Wakanda, he finds a hesitant mentor. Meanwhile, Knight has her own plans and betrays them all, leaving Erik, King and his wife, Celia for death. By issue’s end, Erik gets his calling from Mother Bast, as gets focused more than ever and pursues a path to revenge. Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Conan The Barbarian #3 (Marvel)– In this particular issue, we find out just how tough a young Conan is. As we find a 17 year old Cimmerian who is sentenced to hanging but was strong enough to withstand the gallows and kill anyone who stood in his way. As he gets recaptured and become a true believer in the most unexpected way. By issue’s end, luck was on his side until now and what lies ahead isn’t pretty. Overall: 9
Recommendation: Buy

Old Man Quill #1 (Marvel)– We find quite a melancholy tale in this different tale of this sometimes intergalactic jokester. As we find him as the Emperor of Spartax and attacking a foe who outsmarts him. His world is turned upside down, as we find him years later, broken and a king without a kingdom or a Fam. This until his old crew, The Guardians Of the Galaxy finds him for one last job, one that leads him to the Wastelands where Doom is King. Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Gunhawks #1(Marvel)– In an excellent Western comic, you get a tale of an Invincible lawman, whose days are numbered, as an old foe shows up. The art in this book is breathtaking as it feels like early Frank Quitely. The story definitely feels like a classic William W. Johnstone tale. By issue’s end, a story that will definitely make you pop culture in your favorite John Wayne Western. Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars Age of Republic: Anakin Skywalker #1(Marvel)- I will keep this one sweet and short. This book had a ton of promise on premise alone, what we get is an earnest story that falls through. Overall: 6 Recommendation: Borrow

Ryan C

Red Sonja #1 (Dynamite)** – Mark Russell can do no wrong, it seems, but as it turns out, swords-and-sandals is something he does extremely right, indeed. A simple, well-structured script sets the stage thoroughly and completely for new and old readers alike, the characterization is spot-on, and Mirko Colak’s art is absolutely perfect for this sort of genre yarn. Everything you love about comics in one tidy package. Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

The Girl In The Bay #1 (Dark Horse/Berger Books)** – The consistently-undervalued J.M. DeMatteis turns in one of his best scripts in years in this hippie-flavored existential murder mystery loaded with strong dialogue, great characters, and his trademark eastern mysticism, while newcomer Corin Howell’s art is rich, detailed, and very near fundamentally flawless. A couple of uncharacteristic and frankly embarrassing editorial “misses” take readers out of the book for the briefest of moments, and you’d certainly expect better in that regard from Karen Berger, but apart from that, this is very nearly perfect comic book storytelling. Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

 Female Furies #1 (DC)** – The Fourth World as feminist metaphor? Believe it, as writer Cecil Castellucci and Perez-influenced artist Adriana Melo re-purpose Jack Kirby’s greatest opus as a battle for gender equality with Granny Goodness in the role of sci-fi suffragette. Equal parts darkly humorous and frankly disturbing, this is none-too-subtle stuff, but quite affecting and very well-realized. I’m already thinking six issues of this may not be enough. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Green Lantern #4 (DC)** – Grant Morrison continues to be his new, decidedly-less-ambitious iteration of himself, but he nails sci-fi gunslinger tropes with a fair amount of precision and Liam Sharp’s art just gets better with every issue, here his inventive page layouts complementing the script rather than drawing attention away from it. The real star of the show, though, continues to be Steve Oliff, who is showing once again why he’s still the best colorist in the business. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 2/2

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Logan

Action Comics #1007 (DC)– With new artist Steve Epting (Velvet, Captain America) onboard, Brian Michael Bendis’ run on Action Comics takes a bit of a subterfuge approach to the Big Blue Boy Scout with appearances from General Lane, Amanda Waller, and Jimmy Olsen infiltrating a cult with the power of smooching. His plotting has been a little predictable, but Bendis has done a fantastic job letting readers get to know members of Superman’s supporting cast in Action Comics. Jimmy takes the spotlight, and his youthful naivete and hunger to get the big photograph are on full display mainly through explosive imagery from Epting and colorist Brad Anderson. Bendis and Epting also provide a big emotional beat in Action Comics #1007 that may prove controversial. I’ve been keeping up with this book and not Superman so much so some of Lois Lane’s characterization is a mystery to me even though it seems like Bendis might be breaking them up, especially after the events of this issue… Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read

 Age of X-Man Alpha #1 (Marvel)– Ramon Rosanas’ smooth art and Triona Farrell’s flushed out colors set the scene for this Nate Grey-centric alternate universe X-event. Writers Zac Thompson and Lonnie Nadler craft the flip side of Age of Apocalypse: one where Professor X, Cyclops, and Logan sacrificed themselves to create a perfect world. Everyone is happy, but also everything is regimented, and reflection on history is frowned upon. Enough is teased out in this first issue that it makes me want to explore the nooks and crannies of a world where apparently romantic relationships are banned, and Nightcrawler is a movie star. It’s good read if you like seeing the cracks in utopia and even if you’re a bit behind on the current X-books. Overall: 8 Verdict: Buy

Captain America #7 (Marvel)– Steve Rogers is being accused of the murder of Thunderbolt Ross with his vibranium shield while a cabal of (sometimes literal) corporate vampires called the Power Elite run the United States in the vacuum that HYDRA left behind. Ta-Nehisi Coates and Adam Kubert begin this new arc exploring the desecration of symbols that stand for bigger things. Kubert is a veteran artist with a good eye for layouts and choreography and draws one hell of bar fight between Bucky and some goons. But his and Coates’ best visual moments come in a nine panel grid conversation between Steve and Sharon Carter about whether he should turn himself in or not that ends up being a conversation about the American flag really stands for. And the outcome is pretty exciting story-wise too as the final page gave me goosebumps about the future of the series Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Ryan C

Bone Parish #6 (Boom! Studios)** – Cullen Bunn and Jonas Scharf are really putting together a solid little horror series here. Moving the pieces into place for the second-half run they hit all the right notes with solid characterization, intriguing plot developments, and creepy, atmospheric art. I’m really digging what these two are laying down here. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Quantum Age #6 (Dark Horse)** – A more interesting wrap-up to this six-part “Black Hammer” spin-off than it looks to be at first when you consider that what initially appears to be an “easy out” on writer Jeff Lemire’s part actually plants the seeds for all kinds of interesting developments down the road, and Wilfredo Torres’ art is just plain perfect for this kind of fun, energetic, sci-fi yarn. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Peter Cannon Thunderbolt #1 (Dynamite) – Most everyone knows this is the character that Ozymandias from “Watchmen” is based on, and writer Kieron Gillen uses that to his advantage, playing up the “meta” aspect by springboarding off Ozy’s ultimate mad “interdimensional invasion” plan and revealing a truly surprising hidden hand behind the whole thing. Casper Wijngaard’s art is fairly standard super-hero stuff, but it works just fine for this kind of story. Clever, compelling stuff across the board. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Ice Cream Man #9 (Image)** – It’s great to see this linked horror anthology back after a short hiatus, and writer W. Maxwell Prince appears to be tying the previous stories together, as well as fleshing out his protagonist’s backstory, with this “outer-space western” that gives artist Martin Morazzo plenty to sink his teeth into, as well as providing lots of fuel for your nightmares. This series just keeps getting stronger and stronger. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 1/12

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C


Batman #62 (DC)** – Not so much a stand-alone issue as a sidebar that connects into the current ongoing storyline, this is a pretty gruesome and unrelenting yarn, superbly illustrated by Mitch Gerads and featuring a (who thought we’d be saying this anytime again?) stunning Frank Miller variant cover, but all the pretty bells and whistles can’t hide another lackluster Tom King script. Points for trying, though. Overall: 5.5. Recommendation: Read. Or, more specifically, just look at the pictures

Martian Manhunter #2 (DC)** – Another terrific installment from Steve Orlando and Riley Rossmo that adds depth and mystery both to J’Onn J’Onzz’s past on Mars and his more recent past on Earth. Two issues in, you already get the distinct feeling that this is shaping up to be something well and truly special. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Green Lantern #3 (DC)** – Grant Morrison is getting a bit more ambitious with his scripting here, but it’s still well below his usual standard. Hal Jordan confronts a God-like being who bought the Earth at a cosmic auction and then gets — uhhmmm — overzealous with some bad guys. That’s about it. Nicely-detailed, very crisp art from Liam Sharp elevates the proceedings a bit and truly magnificent colors from the great Steve Oliff elevates them even more, but it’s still a pretty average read at the end of the day. Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Read

Cemetery Beach #5 (Image)** – No one seems to be talking about this brisk, relatively high-concept science fiction barn-burner from Warren Ellis and Jason Howard, and I can’t for the life of me figure out why as it’s both fun and, believe it or not, coming out right on schedule. This is another breakneck chapter that doesn’t give you time to slow down and think, with magnificent, dynamic art. Might be a better read in trade as each “single” only takes a few minutes to read, but that’s a very solid and entertaining few minutes, indeed. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Die #2 (Image)– Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans bring more of the fantasy and RPG elements to the forefront in Die #2 as the main cast of characters are a little frightened to see their long lost friend ruling a fantasy world and also have a good timesettling into their old roles as Godbinder, Neo, Dictator, (especially) Fool, and more. They want to get back and return to their normal lives, but doing spells, fighting, and melding the cyberpunk aesthetic with fantasy can be pretty cool. These contradictions extend to Hans’ art, which ranges from majestic landscapes to maggot ridden corpses. At times, the book feels like Prince Caspian with horror elements, and seeing the heroic quest through jaded adult eyes is both sad and fascinating. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #1 (Marvel)– Tom Taylor and Juann Cabal’s new Spider-Man book is refreshingly street level and not in a crime sort of way, but in a Spider-Man/Peter Parker interacts with his roommates and neighbors, which drives the book. Sure, there’s a fantastic action scene towards the beginning, but Taylor and Cabal immediately connect it to a father and daughter moving to Peter’s area. And until things get weird, psychological, and property damage-y towards the end, this is a very location driven, slice of life book where Spider-Man helps people in his community instead of fighting animal themed villains or ninjas and dealing with awkward Marvel superhero cameos. The backup drawn by Marcelo Ferreira and Roberto Poggi is even more emotionally resonant because it’s told from Aunt May’s POV. This book is the perfect purchase for readers who want their superheroes a little more character driven, and Spider-Man to be involved in his community than whatever jet setting he was doing at the end of Dan Slott’s run. Overall: 8 Verdict: Buy

Martian Manhunter #2 (DC)– Steve Orlando and Riley Rossmo craft an emotional tour de force as J’onn is outed as a Martian to his partner, who completely and totally freaks out. With an almost gooey art style, Rossmo shows the painful effects of fire onthe Martian physiology that leads into a flashback of J’onn as a beat cop on Mars with a wife, kid, and an interest in the planet Earth. Orlando does some crazy worldbuilding with the Martian culture by giving the Green Martians a social shape they show around society and a private one for the closest people in their lives. Character comes before the mystery in this pulp detective story, and this is what makes it successful. Overall: 8.8 Verdict: Buy

Elana

Barbarella / Dejah Thoris #1 (Dynamite) Writer Leah Williams (guest on my next episode of Graphic Policy Radio) and artist: Germán García weave together pulp heroines of two very different eras — the swinging-est of sixties and the birth of pulp fiction in the 1910s — and transform them into a hard scifi story. The art is pleasantly trippy. The science is robust. The ladies are flirting with each other. It’s good! Verdict: Buy

Jon

Die #2 (Image)** On its own merits the first issue of Die was my favorite debut of 2018. This second episode fulfills its promise as we get our first real look at the magical world of Die. Writer. Kieron Gillen is on point, wasting nary a panel or word of dialog to excess. Gillen conjures thrilling action and bizarre horrors with equal aplomb. Stephanie Hans’ artwork comes into its own,rendering Gillen’s visions in expressive lines. I wasn’t completely sold on her style before but now I can’t imagine any other artist taking her place. Die might be the best comic of this year. It also might be one of the best comics ever. Overall Rating:10. Recommendation: Buy.

The Dreaming # 5 (DC/Vertigo)** Si Spurrier and Bilquis Evely’s run on The Dreaming has been the best of the four titles in Vertigo’s Sandman Universe line. This issue is the best yet. Everything starts coming to a head as Judge Gallows reign of terror begins to fracture and Dora prepares to take a stand against his tyranny. Spurrier understands what made Gaiman’s Sandman unique was not just the plot and characters but the deeper themes that united. Evely’s artwork is as magnificent as ever though there are a few fill in pages that are not up to the high standards she has set for this book. Overall Rating: 8. Recommendation: Buy.

The Green Lantern #3 (DC)** Grant Morrison and Liam Sharp’s The Green Lantern may well be one of the most insane comics I’ve ever read…and one of greatest. Morrison has a tendency to outpace his audience and write at a level most mere mortals can’t grasp. Here he manages to avoid that trap nicely producing a fun sci-fi adventure comic with hints of pulp. If you’ve never read a Morrison comic before this is a great one to start with. Every issue has been better than the last and this one is no exception. I never knew I wanted to see Hal Jordan punch God in the face with the giant green boxing glove until Liam Sharp showed it to me. Sharp is the perfect fit for this series. If you loved his work on Wonder Woman this is even better. His lush, hyper detailed style makes you feel like this should be hidden your mattress in an issue of Heavy Metal. The Green Lantern is so good waiting for the next issue hurts. Overall Rating: 10 Recommendation: Buy.

Shean

Star Wars: Jango Fett #1 (Marvel) In this one shot we get Marvel’s version of Batman and Damian. As Jango takes Boba on his first job with a crew. A double cross shows the young prodigy’s aptitude for the job. By issue’s end, this one story I would love to see continued. Overall: 9:3 Recommendation: Buy

Joe Hesh

Young Justice #1 (DC) Another book thats been away a minute that i was looking forward to. Bendis, Gleason no brainer. Well its not quite the bombastic return i was hoping for. Sure its great to see Conner, Cass and Bart back in the fold but it doesn’tfeel quite right. This doesnt feel like a homecoming as much as it does an awkward blind date. Now i love Damian Wayne but without careful observation I almost thought i was reading Tim Drake in a Robin costume again. Also the alien menace come to Earth and everyone bands together has been done to death. Also much better. I love all these characters but the magic is when they are on their downtime and being themselves. This just felt like a generic super team of teens taking on another menace. I’m sure this is just a building issue as all Bendis writing is. He does the long game but it didnt grab me out the gate. I think that is something he forgot how to do. It happened with the first issue of Superman and it happened here. Sure building the danger is great, but it doesn’t have to be boring right at the jump. I will chalk this up as one month and return for the next one but I am certainly not going to be long on this title if this is the tempo. Shame too given the talent that is on it. Overall: What should have felt like seeing long lost friends after many years just felt like a chore and not quite inspired. Score: 5 Recommendation: Pass


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Dynamite Entertainment Announces Comic-Con Mega Sale Through Comixology

Dynamite Entertainment is ramping up for San Diego Comic-Con in style by throwing a massive mega sale on digital comics offered via Comixology!

Dynamite Entertainment offers fan favorites and iconic characters including Vampirella and Red Sonja, John Carter, Dejah Thoris, The Spirit, Garth Ennis’ The Boys, plus multimedia blockbusters A Game of Thrones, James Bond, and Army of Darkness!

A whopping 1,934 comics and graphic novels from Dynamite’s extensive library of characters will be available at a steep discount through Comixology featuring some of the industry’s best-selling and critically acclaimed talent from Gail Simone to Warren Ellis, Mark Waid, Jeph Loeb, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Mark Millar, Grant Morrison, J. Michael Straczynski, Andy Diggle, Greg Pak, Kevin Smith and so many more great creators!

This special Dynamite mega sale runs up to San Diego Comic-Con through July 20, but don’t delay!

Preview: Pathfinder: Spiral of Bones #1

Pathfinder: Spiral of Bones #1

writers: Crystal Frasier (main), Erik Mona (backup)
artist: Tom Garcia (main), Diego Galindo (backup)
covers: Diego Galindo (A), Jonathan Lau (B), Marco Santucci (C), Jen Vaughn (D)
Diego Galindo (RI-B/W), Jonathan Lau (RI-B/W), Marco Santucci (RI-B/W)
FC | 40 pages | $4.99 | Teen +

As the Pathfinder plunge into the history and mysteries below Kaer Maga—the no-holds-barred ‘City of Strangers’—Valeros plunges far deeper into the great beyond, defending his immortal soul in the courts of the dead! From Pathfinder author Crystal Frasier comes this scintillating tale of life, death, and what lingers when we’re gone.

Bonus: Starfinder backup story! Thousands of years in Pathfinder’s future, the Starfinder Society spreads adventure across the solar system!

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