Tag Archives: dono sanchez-almara

Review: Miles Morales: The End

Miles Morales: The End

Throughout January, Marvel is telling the final tales for numerous characters in a series of one-shots. It’s unclear exactly what the point of “The End” comics are, beyond just telling a story. It’s unknown if there’s any impact on Marvel itself or how in continuity these stories are. Kicking it off, Miles Morales: The End, feels like just a one-shot. A predictable one at that.

Written by Mile Morales: Spider-Man writer Saladin Ahmed, Miles Morales: The End isn’t a bad comic but it also isn’t all that exciting either. The story takes place in the future where germs have ravaged the world and a haven exists in Brooklyn. Their greatest threat isn’t the germs around them but ravaging bands of humans thus setting up a clash.

Ahmed’s story is entertaining in a quick read sort of way but lacks impact. The story itself we’ve seen before in various forms and without a real emotional hook it falls short. For fans of Miles Morales, there might be a bit more there as hints abound as to the future of his supporting cast. But, beyond those, the comic feels pretty straightforward and generally unoriginal.

Part of the problem is the one-shot itself. The comic is limited in the amount it can cover leaving some of the more interesting aspects on the shelf and unexplained. There’s an interesting set-up here but things feel generally rushed and not too deep. That all combines for a shallow read that leaves you wondering what the point was.

The art by Damion Scott is good. With color by Dono Sánchez-Almara and lettering by Cory Petit there’s a style to it that has a kinetic energy about it. It’s not all good as some details are hard to tell, especially in Miles’ debut. But, there’s just an energy about the comic to gives it the bit of pick-up that makes the overall comic something to check out.

Miles Morales: The End is worth reading but not something to rush out for. We’ll see what the rest of the one-shots bring as the whole might be better than the individual issues. There may be a point in the future where the comic matters a bit more but at this point it feels like a one-shot that’s generally forgettable.

Story: Saladin Ahmed Art: Damion Scott
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 6.5 Art: 7.75 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation:
Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Incoming #1

Get a look as to what’s coming in 2020 with Incoming #1. Marvel teases what we can expect in the months to come in this end of the year oversized comic.

Story: Various
Art: Various
Color: Various
Letterer: Travis Lanham

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Ghost Rider 2099 #1

What the shock!? Head to 2099 for this new take on the future character as Marvel celebrates 80 years… from now.

Story: Ed Brisson
Art: Damian Couceiro
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Morbius: The Living Vampire #1

Morbius wants nothing but to cure himself. While he attempts that, who’s the mysterious person hunting him?

Story: Vita Ayala
Art: Marcelo Ferreira
Ink: Roberto Poggi
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara
Letterer: Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops November 13! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Marvel Future Fight Firsts: Luna Snow

The origin stories continues in Marvel Future Fight Firsts. Up next is K-Pop star, Luna! Also featuring a back-up story of Future Avengers.

Story: Alyssa Wong
Art: Gang Hyuk Lim, Alé Garza, Cory Hamscher
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara
Letterer: Joe Sabino

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Star Wars: Tie Fighter

Meet Shadow Wing, a crack squad of Tie Fight pilots in this comic miniseries taking place after the battle of Hoth.

The trade collects Star Wars: Tie Fighter #1-5.

Story: Jody Houser
Art: Rogê Antônio, Michael Dowling, Joshua Cassara, Geraldo Borge, Ig Guara, Juan Gedeon
Color: Arif Prianto, Lee Loughridge, Neeraj Menon, Jean-Francois Beaulieu, Dono Sánchez-Almara
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now and in bookstores on October 15! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Absolute Carnage: Symbiote of Vengeance

The Absolute Carnage tie-in feels like it’s more of a lead up to Ghost Rider #1.

Story: Ed Brisson
Art: Juan Frigeri
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Absolute Carnage: Symbiote of Vengeance #1

Absolute Carnage: Symbiote of Vengeance #1

Alejandra Jones, unless you know that name or a big Ghost Rider fan, Absolute Carnage: Symbiote of Vengeance is a bit of a throwaway comic that may be important down the road.

The story revolves around Alejandra Jones who is a Ghost Rider and has a history with symbiotes. Carnage is collecting the “codexes” of those who have been infected with the symbiote. That involves tearing out their spine. Danny Ketch is sent to a small village to help Alejandra and stop Carnage.

Written by Ed Brisson, the comic is, for the most part, one long fight scene. It’s also an intriguing comic. As I said above, it feels like a bit of a throwaway comic. It’s a chapter that’s sort of needed to answer questions about Absolute Carnage of the collecting of the symbiote data. But, where it’s a bigger deal is that it seems like it’ll be an important deal for the upcoming Ghost Rider #1. It’s a stealthy comic in a way. The comic says Absolute Carnage but it’s a leadup for another series.

The comic is really for the hardcore. I doubt many comic fans would have even thought about Alejandra when it comes to Absolute Carnage. And, the story is more geared towards die-hard Ghost Rider fans. The story itself is fine but beyond the last page, its point or need isn’t all that clear.

The art by Juan Frigeri is nice. There’s some solid action and nice designs to characters. The color by Dono Sanchez-Almara has a nice brown and red palette that adds to the comic. Joe Caramagna‘s lettering sticks out not just for Carnage but the always interesting inverted text bubbles of black with white lettering.

Absolute Carnage: Symbiote of Vengeance is a comic that you read quickly and generally forget. It’s entertaining but doesn’t stand out a whole bunch. The comic feels like it’ll become important down the line once Ghost Rider #1 is released. Stealthy is the best way to describe it all.

Story: Ed Brisson Art: Juan Frigeri
Color: Dono Sanchez-Almara Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.25 Art: 7.4 Overall: 7.25 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #2

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge #2

If you asked me to guess the quality of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #2, I’d have been way off. I’ll admit I was a bit biased going in to reading the issue as it’s a tie-in to a theme park. Those types of comics don’t exactly do well. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge though, is a bit different. The comics are focused on the Star Wars aspect first and theme park second. It also brilliantly balances a meta-story while also being an anthology.

Dok-Ondar is surrounded by the First Order who’s not too happy with him. With a Jedi lightsaber present, Dok-Ondar recounts how he came across the Jedi artifact. That story? It’d involve Greedo and the notorious gangster Jabba the Hutt!

Writer Ethan Sacks brilliantly mixes the various eras of Star Wars in this comic. The lightsaber is from the prequels. Greedo we know, and the flashback takes place, during the original trilogy. This series’ main story is during the sequel trilogy. Sacks works all three together and does so in a seamless way.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #2 also balances humor and action. With Greedo as the main star of the story, at times you feel like it’s a Han Solo adventure. Greedo has the attempted swagger of Solo but is an utter failure in what he does. That combination creates a lot of comedy delivering a fun read that’ll get you to laugh or at least enjoy the pulp like feel of it all.

Will Sliney‘s art helps as well. Again, with theme-park tie-ins, I don’t recall the art being all that good. Sliney, with colorist Dono Sanchez-Almara and Protobunker along with letterer Travis Lanham have broken that stereotype. Along with Sacks’ writing, the art has a fun quality element to it all. It’s clear the team is channeling Solo with Greedo. His body language will remind you of the hero. But, that helps, as Greedo is such a screw up, the positive memory is twisted by Greedo’s failures. The art is a driver of the humor.

The issue is a solid one as this series feels like it’s improving. The ability to blend together so many eras of Star Wars is impressive. At the same time the issue really drives home it’s writing its own new addition to that history. This is becoming a surprisingly fun series that’s a perfect summer read.

Story: Ethan Sacks Art: Will Sliney
Color: Dono Sanchez-Almara with Protobunker

Letterer: Travis Lanham
Story: 8.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.45 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge #1

Black Spire Outpost has long been frequented by smugglers, merchants and travelers from every corner of the galaxy looking to make their score on the infamous black market – or experience the exotic thrills only the remote world of Batuu has to offer. Beings like the infamous Dok-Ondar, a proprietor of rare and one-of-a-kind antiquities, thrive on the unique opportunities which abound on the lawless outpost at the very edge of Wild Space! But the evil First Order has come to Batuu and the survival of the entire outpost is at stake! The road to Black Spire’s possible salvation might begin in the past…with a job Han Solo and his partner Chewbacca pulled for Dok-Ondar.

When I heard Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge was a tie-in to the upcoming theme park I honestly didn’t have much hope or expectations. Such tie-ins have been entertaining and cute but few really stand out as interesting or vital. When it comes to it being a Star Wars comic, the standard is a bit higher due to Marvel’s pedigree with their line.

Written by Ethan Sacks, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1 is an entertaining comic introducing us to a new setting and new set of characters who we’ll set upon this adventure with. The point and focus on the comic is a bit unclear to start though as we’re told of a heist in the past pulled off by Han Solo and Chewbacca. The point isn’t quite clear in what that has to do with the present situation but by issue’s end we’re off in the direction of the main focus of it all. That should be entertaining but it’ll be another issue before things really get rolling.

What Sacks, along with artist Will Sliney, colorist Dono Sánchez-Almara and letterer Travis Lanham have put together is a new chapter in the Star Wars myth. New characters. New location. Some interesting twists that expand upon what we know. This first issue is a fun exploration of it all though lacks a depth to really make things interesting. The look of the characters, the story told, the personalities, it feels all very amusement park which makes sense based on the origin of the series. There’s something very non-offensive about it as though every detail is thought through as to what might make the next ride interesting and popular.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1 is an interesting debut but on its own it’s rather forgetable as is. Maybe as the series progresses there’ll be more there to truly make it interesting but beyond new characters there’s little to hook long time Star Wars fans or comic readers.

Story: Ethan Sacks Art: Will Sliney
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara with Protobunker
Lettering: Travis Lanham
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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