Tag Archives: doc savage: the spider’s web

Preview: Doc Savage: Spider’s Web #5

Doc Savage: Spider’s Web #5

writer: Chris Roberson
artist: Cezar Razek
cover: Wilfredo Torres
incentive cover: Wilfredo Torres (B/W art)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

Doc Savage and his companions have discovered that a number of closed cases that they’ve dealt with over the decades and considered to be isolated threats were instead interconnected, all part of a larger web of crime. And now Doc finds himself at the center of that web, face to face with the man behind it all!

DocSavageSpiders05-Cov-A-Torres

Advertisements

Preview: Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #4

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #4

writer: Chris Roberson
artist: Cezar Razek
cover: Wilfredo Torres
incentive cover: Wilfredo Torres (B/W art)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

A new recruit joins the team in 1995, just in time to help Doc Savage and company contend with a group of cyber terrorists who threaten to destabilize the world economy, while in the modern day, the fallout of that case might be the missing piece in the puzzle that Doc is trying to solve.

DocSavageSpiders04-Cov-A-Torres

Preview: Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #3

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #3

writer: Chris Roberson
artist: Cezar Razek
cover: Wilfredo Torres
incentive cover: Wilfredo Torres (B/W art)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

While she seems like a sweet old lady to the staff at the nursing home where she resides, only Doc Savage knows that a seemingly harmless elderly woman was once a member of a doomsday cult that threatened to kick off World War III back in the 1970s, and might well hold the key to a mystery that threatens the safety of the world in the modern day.

DocSavageSpiders03-Cov-A-Torres

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 6/2/16

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Alex

johnnyred4Johnny Red #4 (Titan)** I love this series; it’s a fantastic WWII era story about a British fighter ace fighting for Russia (but do the Russian brass really want him there?) that tugs on my fondness for war comics, my respect for those who fought in the war, and my love of high quality stories. That this just happens to be one of my top two comics released this week, is just a happy accident. While this isn’t an ideal point for new readers to jump on – what with it being right in the middle of the series – it’s worth hunting the back issues down. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Surviving Megalopolis #2 (Dark Horse) I was surprised by this series. It has a slight flavour of Irredeemable but with enough of an original twist to the “Justice League’s gone bad” that it should pique your interest, because it’s well worth reading. Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Cry Havoc #1 (Image) I finally got around to reading a couple of the last week or two’s comics, and this was fantastic. I should have read this when it came out, because the mix of the supernatural, an awesome lead character (or two) and some brilliant art make this a must read. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

europa 3Batman: Europa #2, #3 & #4 (DC)* I found the differences in the art style issue to issue jarring – at first. Then I realized that whether intentional or not (and I think it was) it absolutely makes sense given the nature of the story. I devoured the three remaining issues that I hadn’t picked up in less than an hour. Truly great stuff. Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Amazing Forest #1 & #2 (IDW) Are a pair of fantastic anthology comics. You don’t need to read the first to enjoy the second, but both issues have some brilliant short comic stories within them that are – at times – out of this world, but are all fantastically entertaining. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #3 (Dynamite) Meh. It’s okay, but just doesn’t do it for me. Overall: 6 Recommendation: Read, maybe?

The Precinct #3 (Dynamite) I wasn’t that impressed with the last issue, but this one was a lot better. It definitely drew my interest much better, and felt like a much more complete installment in this story. Plus, the steam punk aspects are fantastically understated. This comic would be just as good without them, but why would you want that? Overall: 8 Recommendation: Read

Cage Hero #4 (Dynamite) While I have enjoyed the issues so far, I’ve enjoyed them as I would the Sharknado movies; Cage Hero is good because it knows exactly what it is, and it celebrates it with every cheesy bit of dialogue, every been-there-read-that scene. The thing is, it does those things almost well enough to be worth buying, but does fall a lttle short. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Buy

 

Mr H

Spider-Man_1_CoverSpider-Man #1 (Marvel Comics)* Whooo Miles is finally here in the Prime Universe! This issue was great. I didn’t enjoy an issue like this from Bendis since his first story arc on Ultimate Spider-Man. Miles is having trouble balancing hero life and school responsibilities. What makes the issue though is when he swings into action. Spidey takes it right to Blackheart and even wields Captain America’s shield! Just a whole lot of fun and it ends with a great cliffhanger. Bendis and Pichelli have another win. I already can’t wait for the next issue. Overall: 9 

 

Patrick

Vision #4 (Marvel) * – This is the best book about robots that needlessly stars robots. There’s really nothing about the book so far that would prevent an editor from taking out the fact that it stars androids and replacing them with a racial or religious minority family and telling the same story. If the point of the story was to humanize the Vision, why is it being injected with this daytime soap plot? I was so glad they acknowledged the Vision had previously been married to the Scarlet Witch because the whole book began to feel like it took place in a pocket universe. Tom King is amazing and I keep reading to see what he’ll do. Gabriel Hernandez Walta is a tremendous talent and I’ll often by a book just because I enjoy his dark tones and the way he captures human emotion. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy this book. The characters just haven’t meshed with the story yet. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

PaperGirls_05-1Paper Girls #5 (Image)– It saddens me to only be writing a shortened review but I don’t want to spend the time being negative about one of my favorite writers in a luscious and gorgeous book. The issue mostly resolves its own tangential distraction this issue and writes two characters who we didn’t really know super well in the first place. I have re-read every issue since it came out and I still have to go back and figure out the names of the four central characters. I like that this issue ends with them literally somewhere else (as it’s beginning to feel like they have just been bouncing back and forth between the same locations accomplishing nothing). The story… I like to start with a summary of what’s happened. You can usually tell how good a book is by how much the summary changes from review to review. I’d be writing the same summary if I did a full review.  Overall: 7 Recomendation: Read

Detective Comics #49 (DC)*– The best part of Jim Gordon-Batman is still just watching him roll with the punches and really do his best. Bruce Wayne-Batman is always treated like a dark god that somehow stands toe-to-toe with everyone from Darkseid to street-pushers. Jim Gordon’s Batman wakes up the whole neighborhood with a blimp spotlight trying to conduct an investigation and fails to get anyone turn it off before just breaking it. I also like some of the darker imagery (for a mainstream DC comic) which helps me balance out the idea that all Batman and his team are doing is watching statues. Seriously, someone’s probably being assaulted in the alleyway adjacent to one of the statues, Batman. Can you think big-picture for a second? Overall: 5.5 Recommendation: Pass

Spider-Man #1 (Marvel)* – This book follows Miles Morales integration into the mainstream universe following the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths (right? I didn’t read Secret Wars, I already had the trade for the original Crisis so I just read that). Honestly, Miles Morales is far more like Peter Parker than Peter Parker has been for a very long time which helps me to understand why this issue ended with me thinking, “Oh, yeah… it’s that red-and-blue rip-off Spider-Man! Oh, red-suit Venom!” Bendis’s best work comes when he is not writing every book with the Marvel logo printed on it (so, essentially everything from before ten years ago), however Sara Pichelli and Justin Ponsor own Miles Morales as far as I’m concerned. There’s something about Pichelli’s angles that make the formerly ultimate Spider-Man so dynamic. I’ve seen static shots of Spider-Man web-slinging for years, but Pichelli’s renditions always make me stop and admire her work. Overall: 6.5 Recommedation: Read

Uncanny X-Men #3 (Marvel)– I miss this book when it was drawn by Rob Liefeld. I miss this book when it was drawn by Mike Allred. I miss this when it was written by Rick Remender. Am I making my point? I struggle with subtly. My point is that it’s sacrilege to have the Uncanny X-Men title be a clone of one of its own spin-off. (I also struggle with perspective.) Overall: 6 Recommendation: Pass

 

Paul

vision 4Vision #4 (Marvel) * Still, in my opinion, the best All New All Different title that I’m reading. Vision still has no idea what his wife has been up to and what she’s hiding; and Virgina comes face to face with her blackmailer and the meeting does not end well. I could feel for her in this issue, and her situation; feeling helpless and things spinning out of control, thanks to King’s writing and complemented beautifully by Walta’s dark tones in the art. I look forward to this title every month and you should be too. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy 

Uncanny Avengers #5 (Marvel)* Well here’s a surprise…I didn’t hate it! Rogue, Deadpool, Human Torch and (briefly) Cable are on the hunt for the Red Skull, or more accurately, Professor X’s brain in Red Skull’s head. They do some good cop/bad cop and get a lead on where to find him. The trio (no Cable) break into where they are told they will find Skull and instead find none other then Gambit. He and Rogue have a brief litte reunion and Red Skull slips right past the team…literally. This isn’t a bad stand alone issue coming off the end of the debut story arc. The action was good and I’m sure the search for Red Skull will be explored in more depth as the series goes on.  Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read 

 

Ryan C

Providence #7 (Avatar Press) *: The best book on the stands by a country effing mile keeps getting better as hapless protagonist Robert Black finds himself thrown into the Lovecraftian underbelly of America’s physical and psychological horror-show and constructs the most bizarrely effective means for rationalizing his experiences, and coming out the other side more cheerful and optimistic, that I’ve ever witnessed. Thrown in themes of class division, loneliness and isolation, and the terrible burden of keeping secrets and this is “Pickman’s Model” as you’ve never seen it before. Alan Moore’s most compelling “major work” in decades combined with Jacen Burrows’ flat-out breathtaking art makes me feel genuine pity for the folks out there who aren’t reading this. Much as I love any number of current comics series, the simple fact is that right now there is “Providence” — and there is everything else.  Overall: 10. Recommendation: Buy

unfollow 4Unfollow #4 (DC/Vertigo) *: Rob Williams’ fiendishly clever social-darwinism-disguised-as-charity premise goes from “gettign warmer” to “heating up” with this issue, and I can only imagine what “boiling” is going to be like. Somebody we’ve gotten to “know” a bit dies in this issue, and it appears we’re going to get a murder mystery added to the mix here, as well. On art, Mike Dowling seems to be stepping out of his self-imposed Frank Quitely shadow and developing his own, more organic style, so that’s good to see, as well.  Overall: 7.5. Recommendation: Buy

The Sheriff Of Babylon #3 (DC/Vertigo) *: Another strong and compelling series of wrinkles is added to our layer-cake of corruption and rat-fuckery in Occupied Iraq — and speaking of fucking it turns out that two of our protagonists are doing just that — but while Mitch Gerads’ art continues to impress with its grittiness and authenticity, the script by “ex-” CIA operative Tom King (yeah, lots of folks quit the CIA and go into low-paying freelance writing) is taking on a more blatant neo-colonialist tone that seems very much of a piece with the right-wing themes on display in the author’s other high-profile works such as “Grayson” and “The Omega Men.” King hasn’t earned the right to be compared to Ditko, but both are examples of people in comics whose work I admire despite finding their politics anywhere from questionable to downright nauseating. If there’s any doubt in your mind as to where King stands, I’ve seen him say that he’s “proud” of the work he did in Iraq. I’m sure his “former” bosses are proud of the work he’s doing, supposedly of his own volition, to spread their worldview in our entertainment media. Troubling material to say the least, but I can’t deny its quality.  Overall: 7. Recommendation: Buy, but know the writer is probably supplementing his income with a check from Langley.

Swamp Thing #2 (DC)*: Len Wein and Kelly Jones’ “back-to-basics” take on the character continues to showcase both the best and worst aspects of 1970s horror comics — the best being Wein’s deliriously OTT purple prose and Jones’ heartfelt stylistic homage to the art of Bernie Wrightson, the worst being the lame-ass, easily-resolved plot (that could, I suppose, work as a one-or two-parter in a monthly ongoing, but feels downright bizarre in a six-issue mini-series) and the shoe-horning in of guest stars for no apparent reason. The Phantom Stranger I could see, sure — but what possible point does plugging Shade from “Starman” into this story serve? Nice little epilogue/cliffhanger at the end, though, and I’m still loving the ride for the most part. Overall: 7. Recommendation: Buy.

 

Shean

Shaft: Imitation of Life#1 (Dynamite Ent.): The adventures of John Shaft continues in this new miniseries as we catchup with him right before he becomes a successful private investigator. All it took was one case of a mobster’s missing daughter to propel his business. As he enjoys the fruit of his success, David Walker proves that it has not changed the man, as he takes on another missing person’s case , finding trouble at every turn. Altogether, a strong first issue to an already entertaining series. Overall:9.4 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write.

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Preview: Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #2

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #2

writer: Chris Roberson
artist: Cezar Razek
cover: Wilfredo Torres
incentive cover: Wilfredo Torres (B/W art)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

While investigating a series of man-made earthquakes that have ravaged South America, Doc Savage finds evidence that links the current case to another which he thought had been closed six decades before, when he and his friends had been all that stood between a private army and the destruction of the lost Mayan empire that was the source of Doc’s vast wealth: the Valley of the Vanished.

DocSavageSpiders02-Cov-A-Torres

Review: Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #2

DocSavageSpiders02-Cov-A-TorresWith explosions, gun battles, political intrigue and an in depth mystery, Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #2 packs some serious punch.

After investigating the body left behind at the end of #1, Doc Savage’s team find another fascinating clue leading Doc and Longshot to danger in California. In truly heroic fashion the pair succeed in collecting another piece of the puzzle, despite the peril that seems to be pursuing the team.

Back at Doc Savage’s headquarters, the team are reminded of a series of events from 1955, which again, just like # 1, connects this mystery to events from the past in the hope of unravelling another strand of the web. The writing, particularly within this stage of the issue, created the perfect amount of tension and intrigue as the events from the past were revealed to draw the characters deeper into the mystery.  As the reader I was seriously hooked.

The artwork used throughout this issue is strong and the use of colour and contrast is exceptional. The action packed scenes are well drawn and support the plot brilliantly.

The storyline created so far in this series is fantastic, and has been executed well.  The elements of mystery and action completely support one another and have the pages turning at lightning speed. This is fully supported by strong dialogue that feels realistic and has helped to develop suitable and realistic relationships between the characters.

Story: Chris Roberson Art: Cezar Razek
Story: 9.5 Art: 9 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Dynamite Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 6/12

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Alex

Bigfoot_SOTE_1-1Big Foot: Sword Of The Earthman #1 is a brilliant mix of John Carter and the typical Sasquatch myth. It’s a fun read, but I’m expecting more out of the series as it progresses. Overall Rating: 7 Recommendation: Read

Cage Hero #1 is becoming a guilty pleasure. Despite an outlandish concept (even for comics), it’s an entertaining story that lets you turn your brain off for five minutes. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Daredevil #1* is probably the best Daredevil comic I’ve read in years… but then that’s not saying much. Regardless, this opening chapter is well worth checking out, and shows plenty of promise. Overall Rating: 8 Recommendation: Read

Finally, the story in Dead Vengeance #3 has caught up to the current events. This issue was the weakest of the three so far, but more so because it’s bridging the bulk of the story so far with what’s coming next. Worth reading if you’re reading the series, otherwise ignore it and waiting for the trade if you’re interested. Overall 7 Recommendation: Read now, or Read the trade later.

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1. It’s okay. Nothing overly special, but not particularly bad, either. Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Maybe read it if it interests you.

Extraordinary X-Men #2* & #3* Due to a slight snafu with my LCS order, I Extraordinary_X-Men_Vol_1_2only recently picked up issue 2 of this series, but it was worth the wait. The scenes in issue #3 between Old Man Logan were interesting, although I expected him to be past that particular  issue, I still enjoyed watching them talk. I can sense the relationship between these two morph into a father/daughter vibe, much like Wolverine had with Kitty Pride or Jubilee. Keep your eye on this series. Overall Rating (Both): 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Seduction of the Innocent #1 is a crime comic in the vein of those before the Comics Code Authority came to pass, something the name of the comic (taken from Fredric Wertham’s book of the same name) pays homage too. As a comic it’s interesting, and it’s worth keeping an eye on the series as it progresses if you’re looking for a well written, well drawn non super hero comic. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Elana

All New Wolverine #2* continues to be Marvel’s best title. Laura kicks ass while continually demonstrating her humanity in the face of monstrous abuses of power. The clones are as heartbreaking as they need to be. I can’t wait for more with the classic villain reveal at the end. Overall 9. Recommendation: Buy

Daredevil_1_CoverDaredevil #1. It feels like a return to form. A return to Miller and Mazzucchelli groundbreaking work with the character decades ago. Quality stuff but I’m not sure what new there is to offer. The bad guy seems like an Orientalist stereotype but I’m excited by Daredevil’s new side kick, Samuel Chung aka Blindspot. He’s an undocumented immigrant and I love the idea of teasing that metaphor out– he’s literally an invisible man. That’s his power.

I’m giving this a 7 but I could easily see it getting better with time. Recommendation: Read

Papergirls #3. Keeps getting spiraling out at getting more complex. But in a good way. It remains addictive and I adore the characters. Another smash hit from Vaughn and Chang. I kinda expect it to get film optioned since 80s period pieces are such a thing and so far I can see that really working. Colorist Matt Wilson should get an Eisner for his work here. Overall 9.25 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write.

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Preview: Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1

writer: Chris Roberson
artist: Cezar Razek
cover: Wilfredo Torres
subscription cover: Marc Laming
incentive cover: Wilfredo Torres (B/W art), Marc Laming (B/W art)
Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

While responding to a devastating earthquake in South America, Doc Savage and company discover that not only was the disaster far from natural, but that it seems to be linked to a menace that Doc faced many years before. As he begins to investigate, Doc discovers that a number of closed cases that he had considered to be isolated threats were in fact part of a larger web that he never suspected before now.

DocSavageSpiders01-Cov-A-Torres

Review: Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1

doc savage

Throwing the reader straight in at the deep end, Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1, opens with gusto. The aftermath of an enormous earthquake has all of Doc Savage’s team investigating the cause, particularly as it seems to have occurred out of the blue. The artwork is intense, depicting the chaos with detail and real purpose, really helping to draw the reader in.

As the team discuss the peculiar events it is of course Doc Savage who recognizes a vital clue. The readers, and other characters, are then taken on a trip down memory lane, to 1935 and the events leading to the Second World War. This is an impressive storyline with key elements of mystery, suspense and tension, and the writing is excellent.  I was really intrigued to find out what was going on and ultimately how Doc Savage and his team were going to prevent any further events.

A huge clue to the recent developments in the modern day mystery is revealed to the reader towards the end of the comic, and the artwork used to display this is fantastic! The feelings are completely visible in the image, and this is supported by some fluent and impressive writing.

At the end of the issue I was left with a burning desire to find out what was going to happen and exactly how the next set of events were going to unfold, the sign of a truly great comic.

Story: Chris Roberson Art: Cezar Razek
Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Dynamite Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

 

Doc Savage Returns this December in… The Spider’s Web

Dynamite Entertainment has announced the return of the legendary action hero, Doc Savage, in an all-new storyline, debuting in December with Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1. Chris Roberson, who previously scribed Dynamite’s Doc Savage: Man of Bronze series, returns for the hero’s brand new adventure, joined by interior artist Cezar Razek.

In Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web, the intrepid explorer and scientist (alongside his trusted team) responds to a devastating earthquake in South America, only to discover that the disaster was no accident… and it seems to be linked to a menace that Doc faced many years before! As his investigation begins, Doc finds that a number of closed cases that he had considered to be isolated threats were in fact part of a larger web that he never suspected before now.

Readers were first introduced to the pulp action of Doc Savage in 1933, courtesy of Doc Savage Magazine by Street and Smith Publications. His adventures have appeared regularly in a variety of media (including novels, comic books, radio serials, and film) over the eighty years since the character’s inception. Raised from the cradle to be the pinnacle of mental and physical perfection, Clark Savage Jr. travels the world using science and sinews to right wrongs, aid the oppressed, and liberate the innocent. With his team of able associates at their headquarters high atop the tallest building in the world, he is tireless in his pursuit of knowledge and justice.

Dynamite will celebrate the debut of Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web with several cover options, allowing retailers and comic fans to satisfy their particular pulp action tastes. Wilfredo Torres provides Cover A for the first issue, while Marc Laming provides Cover B. A “Blank Authentix” edition will also be made available, featuring a blank cover perfect for aspiring artists, convention guests, etc. Finally, Dynamite will create rare incentive variants and high-end collectible editions available through qualifying retailers: Black-and-White and Virgin Art editions by Wilfredo Torres, and a Black-and-White edition by Marc Laming.

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #1 comes to shelves in December.