Tag Archives: displacement

Review: Displacement

DISPLACEMENT

A movie, which has had a long-lasting effect on me, was Sankofa. The movie, made by a film professor at Howard University, expanded on the definition of speculative fiction. It revolved around a model who did a photoshoot in what was a slave castle. Unbeknownst to her, she is transported back in time to when slavery was still legal and her life instantly becomes a living nightmare.

The movie and the story that propelled it brought into view the struggle that many Black people have to contend with. Something that Black Panther did in the fight between T’Challa and Killmonger, showing how these two worlds were not only associated but remained in perpetual struggle. This is an internal fight for all who are of two worlds, never feeling as you belong to either, yet still feeling lost in the wilderness known as life because of it.  In Kiku Hughes‘s affecting Displacement, we find one such protagonist, who finds out firsthand what her grandmother went through during World War II in her own living nightmare.

We meet Kiku as she writes in a journal, of her current predicament, as her situation is not normal, as she stuck back in a time that is not hers. As she recalls the first time, she traveled back in time, when her mother took her to San Francisco, to find the house her grandmother lived in, when suddenly everything around her was instantly different, and she was at her grandmother’s school, and where she saw a disturbing sign, but before she could make sense of what happened, she was transported back to her time and back to her mother, who was trying to find her. This would happen to Kiku a few more times before it happened permanently. She finds herself in an internment camp, with her grandmother. She endures the atrocities that all Japanese American people did at that time, including being separated from family, censoring newspapers, random inspections, being moved to another internment camp with no notice, loyalty questionnaires, and allegiance hearings. From there it’s a mystery of the travel and what it will take for her to return to her own time.

Overall, Displacement is an illuminating and harrowing story that shows the devastating effects of “trauma in the blood” and no matter how many generations have passed. As Shakespeare eloquently eschewed “ What’s past is prologue” and this important book is the most brilliant and heartfelt exposition of that quote in our modern times. The story by Hughes is fantastical, poignant, and relevant. The art by Hughes is awe-inspiring. Altogether, a story that should bring full circle why the legalization of racial discrimination at any time, is not only deplorable but un-human.

Story: Kiku Hughes Art: Kiku Hughes
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall:10 Recommendation: Buy

First Second provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: Amazon – Hardcover/Paperback/Kindle

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Ginseng Roots #6

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman: Three Jokers #1 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – After a long build up and teases, the first issue is here and it’s…. interesting.

Displacement (First Second) – A teenager is pulled back in time to witness her grandmother’s experiences in a WWII-era Japanese internment camp.

Flamer (Henry Holt) – Aiden heads to summer camp and navigates his feelings about being gay.

Ginseng Roots #6 (Uncivilized Comics) – Craig Thompson continues to explore his youth and it revolving around ginseng. A fascinating autobiography.

Hellions #3 (Marvel) – The most intriguing entry in Marvel’s new line of X-Men? The battle against the Goblin Queen continues.

Locke & Key: In Pale Battalions Go #1 (IDW Publishing) – Prepare to open a door onto one of the grimmest battlefields of the 20th century, whose darkness might even strike fear into an army of supernatural shadows.

Map to the Sun (First Second) – A YA graphic novel about five principle players in a struggling girls’ basketball team. The presentation is amazing.

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 (BOOM! Studios) – The animated reboot comes to comics. While we haven’t seen the show, we’re excited to check out the comic as fans of the video game.

Nailbiter Returns #4 (Image Comics) – If you like horror or slasher movies, you’ll enjoy this comic series.

The School for Extraterrestrial Girls (Papercutz) – Jeremy Whitley and Jamie Noguchi’s new graphic novel series about a school for extraterrestrials.

X-Factor #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was fantastic and to have a detective series that fills a niche of solving one of the flaws of Krakoa should be interesting going forward.

Displacement: A Travel Memoir by Lucy Knisley

New York Times Best Selling cartoonist Lucy Knisley is back with her graphic memoir, Displacement, out in January from Fantagraphics. After reluctantly agreeing to go on a vacation cruise with her elderly grandparents, Lucy embarks on a what she thinks will be a voyage of hardship and tedium. Documenting the minutiae of what happens on the trip, Knisley is faced with mortality, her grandmother’s declining mental health, and the physical frailty that comes with aging.

Excerpting portions of her grandfather’s WWII diary, Knisley takes the reader along on a journey of personal discovery. Part travelogue, and part family history, Displacement recounts Knisley’s attempt to not only connect with her grandparents, but to understand herself a bit better in the process.

Displacement