Tag Archives: dee cunniffe

Bad Karma #2 is Out Now on Panel Syndicate

Ethan and Sully’s quest to put things right goes more and more wrong, earning them the suspicion and anger of loved ones, old colleagues, and new acquaintances, until the two men of violence are forced to fall back on the only thing they know.

Bad Karma #2 by Alex De Campi, Ryan Howe, and Dee Cunniffe is out now on Panel Syndicate. Panel Syndicate is a pay-what-you-want digital platform. The 36-page second issue is available now in English, as usual, for whatever price you want to pay.

Bad Karma #2 cover

Review: The Man F#&%ed Up Time #3

Time is messed up and this is all about the man who f#&%ed it up. The Man F#&%ed Up Time #3 is packed with so much detail in the art, you’ll linger on the page to get the whole story.

Story: John Layman
Art: Karl Mostert
Color: Dee Cunniffe
Letterer: John Layman

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: The Man Who F#%&ed Up Time #4

The Man Who F#%&ed Up Time #4

Writer: John Layman 
Artist: Karl Mostert 
Colorist: Dee Cunniffe 
Letterer: John Layman 
Cover: Karl Mostert w/ Dee Cunniffe
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 07.22.20

Sean Bennett’s been racing the clock, trying desperately to repair the f#%&ed up space-time continuum and get the dreaded robotic Future Police off his back, but everything he’s done has made things worse. So, Sean simply says “f#%& it,” figuring things couldn’t get any worse, but it turns out things COULD get worse. Like, extinction of humanity worse! Whoops!  

Presenting a time-twisted sci-fi action-comedy, a butterfly effect noir, by multiple Eisner-winning writer John Layman (Chew, ELEANOR & THE EGRET) and talented newcomer Karl Mostert. Order it today…before time runs out! 

The Man Who F#%&ed Up Time #4

Review: Youth #1

Youth #1

Youth #1 is a new take on both the coming of age and superhero genres from Curt Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cunniffe. It’s about two teenagers, River and Frank, who are kind of, sort of boyfriends, that are fed up with their lives so they steal River’s step dad’s mustang and go on the run. The comic has plenty of attitude, a little bit pretentiousness, and goes full throttle from the first page where Pires and Diotto cross cut between River being berated by his step dad and Frank being berated by his manager and a random customer at the fast food restaurant he works at. (Seriously, everyone seems to be an asshole in this universe.)

My favorite part of Youth #1 is Pires and Diotto’s creative use of grid layouts to introduce characters, ramp up conflict, and pull off one hell of a car chase. They immediately create parallels between River and Frank and establish a relationship between them based on shared trauma even though they don’t appear on panel together eight pages in. Basically, the world treats them like shit so they lash out through one great two panel page punch before slowing down to a more romantic nine panel grid with soft colors from Cunniffe.

After the blows are landed, Curt Pires immediately backpedals and uses a Mike Tyson quote to establish our protagonists as both unreliable narrators and the opposite of role models. With some Pires comics in the past, he seems to over-rely on purple prose narration, but he’s pared down this a lot or undercut it with self-deprecating humor. I enjoy that he and Diotto portray Frank and River as a couple of messed up kids, who fall in with other messed up kids later in the comic crafting a drama filled ensemble cast. Think the attractive cast of a reality television show, but with more overt drug use, assault of police officers, and in a breath of fresh air, queerness.

Heteronormativity is a big no-no in Youth #1 with River and Frank treating their homophobic classmate with a shrug as they skip town in a Mustang, or Frank telling a girl he makes out with at a party that he doesn’t like to label his sexuality. Your average, middle aged boring writer at the Big Two would make the high school bully some great foe for them, but he’s just an annoyance on their way to other adventures like blowing up cars, reenacting Grand Theft Auto, and this issue’s explosive ending.

Rebellion seems to be the central theme of Youth #1 with Frank and River truly having some to rage against as evidenced in the opening scene. However, it seems like some of their peers are rebelling just to rebel like the host of the party, who is the son of a senator, and parties in his huge house while his dad is doing consulting work in Dubai. The line of dialogue and corresponding image from Diotto is sharp satire at the children of well-off people, who choose to act out and rebel, but honestly, it makes sense that the cast of Youth are rough around the edges and can’t articulate their actions into a neat thesis.

Beat up a cop, go on the run, and fuck the consequences because life is short, right. However, the tail end of Youth #1 does introduce some consequences that will shape the narrative of this miniseries as Pires and Diotto introduce change into their story ecosystem like a splash page after a neat grid or car chase scene where you can see every maneuver.

Tone-wise, with its musical influence, teens on the run motif, and lackadaisical approach to superpowers, Youth #1 is We Can Never Go Home meets Chronicle, which is interesting because Pires has a written a few comics for Black Mask Studios. With their messy motivations, lust for life, and distrust of authority, I definitely gravitated to the teens of Youth even though they come across as little assholes at times. But weren’t we all at that age?

Story: Curt Pires Art: Alex Diotto 
Colors: Dee Cunniffe Letters: Micah Myers
Story: 7.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Comixology Originals provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

ComiXology Original Youth by Curt Pires and Alex Diotto Goes from Comic to Amazon Studios

Youth #1

Youth, a new four-part weekly comic series beginning May 12, is currently in development as an original series for Amazon Studios. The comiXology Original digital comic series is by Curt Pires and Alex Diotto. Pires is attached to adapt the comic for streaming. The comic is already renewed for a second season in production and Pires has two more projects in the works with comiXology. Color for the comic is by Dee Cunniffe with lettering by Micah Myers.

The comic is about the next generation of superheroes. It’s the story of two high school students who are a queer couple and run away discovering a world different than what they have imagined.

Below is the official synopsis:

In YOUTH, Franklin and River struggle to navigate family, friends, high school, work, drugs, and all the pressures of growing up. As a queer couple, they yearn to escape their lives in a small, bigoted Midwest town. They steal River’s stepfather’s Mustang and hit the road. Their destination? California. But along the way, the car breaks down. They meet some kids who are travelling the country, partying, and attempting to find themselves. They party some more. . . . And soon everything changes.

The comic will be available for no additional cost for Amazon Prime, Kindle Unlimited and ComiXology Unlimited subscribers, in addition to being available for purchase for Kindle and ComiXology.

Alex De Campi, Ryan Howe, and Dee Cunniffe Launch Bad Karma on Panel Syndicate

Panel Syndicate is celebrating traditional new comic book day with a brand new series from Alex De Campi, Ryan Howe, and Dee Cunniffe. Today sees the debut of their new character-based action/thriller series Bad Karma.

Army veterans Sully and Ethan go on a Christmas road trip to free an innocent man blamed for a mercenary job they did. Turns out nobody’s interested in the truth, but they get very interested in making sure Sully and Ethan don’t live to see the New Year.

The 33-page first issue is available now in English, as usual, for whatever price you want to pay, including 0 (zero) at panelsyndicate.com!

Bad Karma

Review: Stronghold Vol. 1 The Primacy

It’s a battle of good vs. evil, or is it? Michael Grey believes he’s a normal person but reality is he’s so much more.

Stronghold Vol. 1 The Primacy collects issues #1-5.

Story: Phil Hester
Art: Ryan Kelly
Co-Creator: Tyler Walpole
Color: Dee Cunniffe
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy in comic shops now in bookstores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Check Out the Cover and a First Look at House of El by Claudia Gray and Eric Zawadzki

Known for her acclaimed Star Wars novels, Evernight series, and other sci-fi/fantasy works, YA author Claudia Gray is coming to DC next January to share a brand-new vision of the destruction of Krypton, one of the most famous tragedies in all of comics. In House of ElGray will explore life on Krypton through the eyes of Zahn and Sera—two teenagers who are different in every way—as they come together to investigate the dangers threatening their planet. The three-part young adult graphic novel series will be brought to life by illustrator Eric Zawadzki, and the first installment will debut January 5, 2021.

House of El Book One: The Shadow Threat

Written by Claudia Gray
Illustrated by Eric Zawadzki
Colored by Dee Cunniffe
Lettered by Deron Bennett
On sale: January 5, 2021
MSRP: $16.99
Available to pre-order now.

Welcome to a brand-new vision of one of the most famous tragedies in all of comics from New York Times bestselling author Claudia Gray and illustrator Eric Zawadzki. In this first graphic novel in a trilogy, explore Krypton like never before: through the eyes of two teenagers on opposite sides of the same extinction-level event.

Zahn is one of Krypton’s elites: wealthy, privileged, a future leader. Sera is one of Krypton’s soldiers: strong, dedicated, fearless. Their rule-bound society has ordained that their paths should never cross.

But groundquakes are shaking the planet’s surface. Rebellious uprisings are shaking the populace. Krypton’s top scientists—Jor-El and Lara—conduct a secret experiment that is meant to reform their planet from the cellular level up. Zahn and Sera must join forces to investigate the hidden dangers truly threatening Krypton. In the process, they form a bond that just might endure past the end of the world…

House of El Book One: The Shadow Threat

Review: The Man F#&%ed Up Time #2

The title really says it all as The Man F#&%ed Up Time is about Sean, who messes up time. It’s pretty straightforward. It’s a humorous series for those that enjoy Bill & Ted and Back to the Future.

Story: John Layman
Art: Karl Mostert
Color: Dee Cunniffe
Letterer: John Layman

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle/comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Olympia #1

Olympia #1

Olympia #1 kicks off a love letter to comics. The debut issue revolves around Elon, a latchkey kid who spends his days alone reading comic books. One day his favorite superhero, Olympian, comes crashing into reality. The concept is something we’ve seen before but there’s a heartfelt aspect to this debut that oozes off of the page.

Created by Tony Pires and Curt Pires, Olympia was created by them as Tony was undergoing treatment for cancer. There’s an earnest meditation on hope and loss in the first issue as we get hints of Elon’s life. The comic also oozes wonder as Elon meets his hero. There’s something for every comic fan to relate to in this debut which makes it all the more impressive. Whether it’s Elon’s personal life or his isolation reading comics, it’s something we’ve experienced.

While the concept, so far, doesn’t feel original, there’s just an enthusiasm that works in the comic. It’s relatable and emotional set up that sucks readers in. It’s also clearly a love letter to comics. From the magical story itself to the art.

The art by Alex Diotto riffs on the classic work of Jack Kirby who’s quoted within the comic. From the colors by Dee Cunniffe to the lettering of Micah Myers there’s a feel of “retro” in so much of the comic. A use of a Kirby crackle to the style of the colors and type of coloring, there’s been a lot of thought to create a look that evokes the classic comics the story loves.

Olympia #1 is the fantastical experience of a reader being drawn into the world they’re engaging in. There’s a meta aspect to the comic as we the reader are sucked into the experience ourselves. It’s a comic you can enjoy for the story and connect on an emotional and personal level. It’s an experience and story we can all relate to in some way.

Story: Tony Pires, Curt Pires Art: Alex Diotto
Color: Dee Cunniffe Letterer: Micah Myers Design: Ryan Ferrier
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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