Tag Archives: dave stewart

Search for Hu banner ad

Dark Horse Comics Celebrates 20TH Anniversary of Mike Mignola’s Award-Winning Graphic Novel The Amazing Screw-On Head With a New Edition Featuring 40 Pages of New Material

In 2022, Dark Horse Comics will celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Mike Mignola and Dave Stewart’s seminal Eisner Award-winning graphic novel The Amazing Screw-On Head and Other Curious Objects with the publication of a new hardcover edition, which features forty pages of new material. The new hardcover edition will include nineteen pages of the never completed, never-before-published Axorr, Slayer of Demons story, written and drawn by the legendary creator of Hellboy.

In The Amazing Screw-On Head and Other Curious Objects, Emperor Zombie is trying to take over the world once again. The Amazing Screw-On Head has been enlisted by President Lincoln to stop the evil emperor, with the help of his faithful partner Mr. Groin and his trusty canine companion Mr. Dog. Screw-On Head will have to brave ancient tombs and defeat demons from a dimension inside a turnip, just one of the strange and mischievous tales in this beloved collection.

The Amazing Screw-On Head Anniversary Edition will be available from Dark Horse Comics in comic book stores on June 22, 2022 and in bookstores on July 5, 2022.

The Amazing Screw-On Head  Anniversary Edition

Preview: Sir Edward Grey: Acheron

Sir Edward Grey: Acheron

(W) Mike Mignola (A/CA) Mike Mignola
In Shops: Dec 01, 2021
SRP: $3.99

Hellboy is gone, and the B.P.R.D. managed to fight off the monsters on earth long enough for humanity to just barely escape underground, but Edward Grey must return to Hell to confront a familiar foe and finish what needs to be done to truly save the world.

Continuing after B.P.R.D.: The Devil You Know ended in 2019, this one-shot is written and drawn completely by Mignola with colorist Dave Stewart, featuring a cover by Mignola and Stewart and a variant cover by longtime Hellboy universe artist Ben Stenbeck.

A full issue written and drawn solely by Mignola!

Sir Edward Grey: Acheron

12-Gauge Comics Expands its Serial Killer Universe with Plastic Hardcover and New Narco OGN from Doug Wagner and Daniel Hillyard

Four years ago, writer Doug Wagner, artist Daniel Hillyard, colorist Laura Martin, and letterer Ed Dukeshire unleashed Edwyn, a retired serial killer with a…unique girlfriend, Virginia, who just so happens to be a blow-up doll. Published by Image Comics, Plastic charts Edwyn’s descent into madness as he embarks on a brutal, chaotic (and often hilarious) war on the unfortunate souls who kidnap his synthetic lover. 

That same creative team presents the definitive edition of this gonzo blood-splattered epic with the Plastic: Deluxe Edition hardcover. This volume features a new cover from Hillyard and Martin alongside a new “lost scene” six-page backup story revealing Edwyn’s brutal origins. 

In addition, that same team has also reunited alongside colorist Dave Stewart for Narco, a new 136-page graphic novel and the next phase of the Plastic universe. (The overarching fiction also includes Vinyl, the killers-vs-cultists blockbuster by Wagner and Hillyard currently published by Image Comics.) 

Narco is a Hitchcockian thriller about a benevolent 20-something–Marcus–who suffers from a rare form of narcolepsy triggered by stressful and traumatic events. After being wrongfully accused of his neighbor’s murder, Marcus pursues the true killer at the mercy of his sleep-inducing condition.

Both the Plastic: Deluxe Edition and Narco are available exclusively in a joint Kickstarter. Any orders completed by 12:12 PM EST on Wednesday (10/27/2021) receive a free PLASTIC print by Daniel Hillyard and Laura Martin. 

Echolands #2 Heads Back to Print

The eye popping new release to hit shelves—Echolands #2 by J.H. Williams III, W. Haden Blackman, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Todd Klein—has hit big with readers and sold out completely at the distributor level. Image will fast-track the issue for a reprint in order to keep up with growing customer demand.

In Echolands #2, Hope Redhood and her companions, Cor, Caniff, Castrum, Dena, Rabbit, and Rosa, are on the run from the Wizard, Teros Demond, and his terrifying daughter. Why is the Wizard willing to kill to regain his stolen gem? Can Hope and her crew escape the strange robots lurking in the tunnels beneath San Francisco? And will they survive a betrayal by the pirate captain, Bloody Gums?

This breathtaking series defies comic book medium expectations and provides an unforgettable feast-for-the-eyes in a sprawling landscape format. Each spread page expertly showcases the artwork and the unique reading experience instantly sent fans abuzz with excitement for its mesmerizing story.

Set in a bizarre future world that has forgotten its history, Echolands follows reckless thief Hope Redhood. Hope holds the key to excavating a strange, dark past—but only if she and her crew can escape a tyrannical wizard and his unstoppable daughter. But fate will send them all on a path leading to a war between worlds.

Echolands is a mythic fiction epic where anything is possible; a fast-paced genre mashup adventure that combines everything from horror movie vampires to classic mobsters and cyborg elves, to Roman demigods and retro rocket ships. It’s going to be a helluva ride!

Echolands #2, second printing Cover A (Diamond Code AUG218991) and Echolands #2, second printing Cover B 1:25 copy incentive (Diamond Code AUG218992) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, November 17.

Review: Arkham City: The Order of the World #1

Arkham City: The Order of the World #1

DC has been weaving a very interesting world and story in their Batman titles. Since “Future State” ended, everything presented has been a step towards that dystopian fascist nightmare. To kick off the slide into police rule, “A Day” wiped out Arkham Asylum murdering patients and caregivers, and freeing some of the inmates. It was an attack that set in motion Simon Saint’s vision for a new “police force” for Gotham in the Batman comics and began the tension that has been present throughout James Tynion IV’s run. But, what about those inmate that escaped? Arkham City: The Order of the World #1 explores that focusing on Dr. Joy and the police tasked with rounding up the escaped inmates.

Written by Dan Watters, Arkham City: The Order of the World #1 is an interesting comic as it feels a lot like a police procedural you’d see on television. Dr. Joe attempts to deal with some of the inmates as they’re being apprehended by the police but we also see the media swarming. The comic has an underlying debate about what the public needs to know and if they do, will that only cause more panic? And Watters is very smart about that. While the comic opens with the apprehension of Ratcatcher, it bounces around with glimpses of other characters with one delivering an unexpected twist that attempts to answer the question thrown out to the readers.

The comic also has a solid debate within about what to do with these individuals. Are they criminals? Do they need psychological help? With Arkham destroyed, what facilities are there to handle them? It’s a debate about our own healthcare/mental health/jail system and what’s the best way to handle certain individuals. It adds a level of intelligence to the comic that could easily just be a riff on Se7en (and the comic has a lot of vibes from that film).

What really stands out is the art by Dani. The style is fantastic with a look that’s a bit Francesco Francavilla, Jae Lee, and Tim Sale. With Dave Stewart‘s colors, the comic is disturbing at times and beautiful at others. But, overall, there’s a tension that is created with the art style and colors that fits the narrative so well. There’s a coldness about it all that matches Dr. Joy and the characters within. It’s a fantastic mix of visuals and colors that come together to really drive home the mood and ride the readers are taken on. Aditya Bidikar‘s lettering too adds to that all with a mix of handwritten notes and dialogue each giving so much personality to the characters. The lettering adds to the unease and coldness of it all.

Arkham City: The Order of the World #1 is a solid start, perfect for the Halloween season. It answers some important questions raised after “A Day” that aren’t being dealt with elsewhere. Most importantly, it ties into the greater narrative without being bogged down by it. This is a comic that has a style, voice, and vision all its own and for those that love horror or police procedurals, this a comic that’s a must get.

Story: Dan Watters Art: Dani
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Aditya Bidikar
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties

Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties

Hellboy comics can be a hell of a lot of fun. Mike Mignola has created characters and a world that balances a rich and complicated universe but also can deliver stories that can be picked up and enjoyed with little knowledge. Mignola has figured out how to balance the ongoing narrative with the one-shot. Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties is example of the comic you can just pick up and enjoy. You have to have little knowledge of the characters but if you do, there’s clearly more to this issue.

Written by Mignola and Chris Roberson, Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties has Hellboy and Agent Xiang looking for a book that can summon demons. It takes them to a house where unnatural things are occurring or it could be horrible family relations. There’s not a ton you really need to know to enjoy the comic. It’s a pretty typical “fight demons” type of story. Where it works well is the build up and tension.

Mignola and Roberson keep the readers guessing. Who’s the malignant force in the house? Who is going to be the demon they must fight? Where’s the demon they’ll have to fight? It’s all pretty standard but the way it’s presented will leave you not knowing who can be trusted until that’s revealed. There’s also some solid creepy moments. You get a cinematic feel as the horrors are presented. While it doesn’t deliver scares, there’s a general unease created by the imagery that works really well.

That’s due to the art of Laurence Campbell. Joined by Dave Stewart on colors and Clem Robins lettering, the visuals for the comic are excellent. There are some solid moments that really will make readers unease but never grossed out. There’s the type of visuals you’re not expecting so they deliver a slight punch as they’re revealed. But, it’s all done in a way that doesn’t really scare as opposed to make readers “sick”. With the colors and pencils combined, the art has a vibe about it that is more unease and gross than make you not want to turn a page.

Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties is a solid start to this series of one-shot comics. It has some details that fans of the Hellboy world will enjoy but those who have never read a story can ignore and not miss anything. It’s a solid horror comic for this Halloween season and one fans of Hellboy or the horror genre should check out.

Story: Mike Mignola and Chris Roberson Art: Laurence Campbell
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Clem Robins
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.3 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Primordial #1

Primordial #1
Primordial #1, cover by Andrea Sorrentino

The Space Race between the Soviets and the Americans during the 1960s has always been fertile ground for conspiracy-centric storytelling, ripe with classic sci-fi concepts and ideas informed by a long tradition of weird fiction. Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new book, Primordial, is firmly set within that tradition, but what it’s managed to produce on the visual front is what truly stands out as special.

Primordial follows a black electrical engineer from MIT called Dr. Pembrook, a man who’s interest in an American space mission where monkeys were shot into space to test travel by shuttle leads him to a secret report about the operation’s hasty cancellation that questions whether the alleged failure of the project was fact or an elaborate fiction to cover something up.

Pembrook’s discovery pushed him down the rabbit hole into conspiracy territory, led by a question that instantly makes the story take a whole new spin: what if the animal shuttle flights revealed something that scared everyone into not pursing further travel?

Lemire’s script perfectly captures the nail-biting paranoia that tends to be a staple in these types of stories, but when things get cosmic, it’s Sorrentino who steps up and steals the spotlight. It works because Lemire allows the plot to unravel in two spaces, if you will, in which Pembrook’s side is allowed to develop on its own while the animals’ flight is also given room to present its trajectory.

Primordial #1
Primordial #1

The more traditional, almost spy-thriller aspects of the story belong to Pembrook while the all-out sci-fi part of the equation is afforded to the animals. Sorrentino capitalizes on the setup to let loose in what can only be described as pure and unfiltered creativity, especially when it comes to the space travel sequences.

Panel work in these sections of the book break with structure and form to reach a higher level of visual play that ranges from panel collisions to colors flying off into unexpected parts of the page. It all combines to create a sense of wonder and even fear that frames the animals’ experience as a complete transformation of the rules of physics that will transport them to uniquely unknown places.

It tips its hat to Jack Kirby sci-fi, but it also borrows from classic rock and prog album cover art to breath life into many of the surprises the book viscerally throws at its readers as the story’s pacing picks up. In other words, Primordial is a visual marvel, a feast for the eyes that’s hard not to get lost in.

Dave Stewart’s coloring is largely responsible for the visuals’ triumphs as well. The book is bright and it captures the kind of naïve optimism that tends to characterize attempts at space travel. It makes for an experience in which the unknown is given a chance to reveal itself and to pose questions that go beyond what’s seen. Stewart’s work elevates that idea and gives it new dimensions.

Primordial #1 possesses a very exciting and intense sense of discovery and exploration that rests on the notion that secrets and conspiracies can generate quite a set of sense-shattering images. It’s a supreme example of what can be achieved with visual storytelling and how comics can offer narrative possibilities other mediums can only hope to imagine.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Andrea Sorrentino Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Recommendation: Read and make sure to give comics to space animals for their voyages

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Mike Mignola to Illustrate His First Full Length Comic in Five Years – Sir Edward Grey: Acheron

For the first time in five years, legendary Hellboy creator Mike Mignola is both writing and illustrating a full-length comic book, one which provides the next chapter in the fabled Hellboy Universe. Titled Sir Edward Grey: Acheron, the one-shot story is set following the events of B.P.R.D.: The Devil You Know, in which the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense managed to fight off the monsters on Earth long enough for humanity to barely escape underground. The story is Mignola’s first full-length comic book since Dark Horse Comics published Hellboy in Hell in 2016. Here he reunites with award-winning colorist Dave Stewart, as well as letterer and longtime collaborator Clem Robins. Dark Horse Comics will publish Sir Edward Grey: Acheron this winter, featuring a main cover by Mignola and Stewart and a variant cover by acclaimed artist Ben Stenbeck.   

Sir Edward Grey: Acheron will be published by Dark Horse Comics on December 1, 2021.

  • Sir Edward Grey: Acheron

Echolands #1 Sells Out and Gets a New Printing

The highly anticipated Echolands #1 by J.H. Williams III, W. Haden Blackman, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Todd Klein launched to immense critical acclaim and has sold out completely at the distributor level. The debut issue is being rushed back to print in order to keep up with escalating demand.

This breathtaking launch defies comic book medium expectations and provides an unforgettable feast-for-the-eyes in a sprawling landscape format. Each spread page expertly showcases the artwork and the unique reading experience instantly sent fans abuzz with excitement for its mesmerizing story.  

Set in a bizarre future world that has forgotten its history, Echolands follows reckless thief Hope Redhood. Hope holds the key to excavating a strange, dark past—but only if she and her crew can escape a tyrannical wizard and his unstoppable daughter. But fate will send them all on a path leading to a war between worlds.

Echolands is a mythic fiction epic where anything is possible; a fast-paced genre mashup adventure that combines everything from horror movie vampires to classic mobsters and cyborg elves, to Roman demigods and retro rocket ships. It’s going to be a helluva ride!

Echolands #1, second printing Cover A (Diamond Code JUN219179) and Echolands #1, second printing Cover B 1:25 copy incentive (Diamond Code JUN219180) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 6.

Available on Wednesday, September 29:

  • Echolands #2 Cover A by Williams III – Diamond Code JUL210225
  • Echolands #2 Cover B by Sampson – Diamond Code JUL210226
  • Echolands Raw Cut Edition #1 Cover A by Williams III – Diamond Code JUL210058
  • Echolands Raw Cut Edition #1 Cover B by Williams III – Diamond Code JUL210059

Early Review: Primordial #1

Primordial #1
Primordial #1, cover by Andrea Sorrentino

The Space Race between the Soviets and the Americans during the 1960s has always been fertile ground for conspiracy-centric storytelling, ripe with classic sci-fi concepts and ideas informed by a long tradition of weird fiction. Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new book, Primordial, is firmly set within that tradition, but what it’s managed to produce on the visual front is what truly stands out as special.

Primordial follows a black electrical engineer from MIT called Dr. Pembrook, a man who’s interest in an American space mission where monkeys were shot into space to test travel by shuttle leads him to a secret report about the operation’s hasty cancellation that questions whether the alleged failure of the project was fact or an elaborate fiction to cover something up.

Pembrook’s discovery pushed him down the rabbit hole into conspiracy territory, led by a question that instantly makes the story take a whole new spin: what if the animal shuttle flights revealed something that scared everyone into not pursing further travel?

Lemire’s script perfectly captures the nail-biting paranoia that tends to be a staple in these types of stories, but when things get cosmic, it’s Sorrentino who steps up and steals the spotlight. It works because Lemire allows the plot to unravel in two spaces, if you will, in which Pembrook’s side is allowed to develop on its own while the animals’ flight is also given room to present its trajectory.

Primordial #1
Primordial #1

The more traditional, almost spy-thriller aspects of the story belong to Pembrook while the all-out sci-fi part of the equation is afforded to the animals. Sorrentino capitalizes on the setup to let loose in what can only be described as pure and unfiltered creativity, especially when it comes to the space travel sequences.

Panel work in these sections of the book break with structure and form to reach a higher level of visual play that ranges from panel collisions to colors flying off into unexpected parts of the page. It all combines to create a sense of wonder and even fear that frames the animals’ experience as a complete transformation of the rules of physics that will transport them to uniquely unknown places.

It tips its hat to Jack Kirby sci-fi, but it also borrows from classic rock and prog album cover art to breath life into many of the surprises the book viscerally throws at its readers as the story’s pacing picks up. In other words, Primordial is a visual marvel, a feast for the eyes that’s hard not to get lost in.

Dave Stewart’s coloring is largely responsible for the visuals’ triumphs as well. The book is bright and it captures the kind of naïve optimism that tends to characterize attempts at space travel. It makes for an experience in which the unknown is given a chance to reveal itself and to pose questions that go beyond what’s seen. Stewart’s work elevates that idea and gives it new dimensions.

Primordial #1 possesses a very exciting and intense sense of discovery and exploration that rests on the notion that secrets and conspiracies can generate quite a set of sense-shattering images. It’s a supreme example of what can be achieved with visual storytelling and how comics can offer narrative possibilities other mediums can only hope to imagine.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Andrea Sorrentino Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Recommendation: Read and make sure to give comics to space animals for their voyages

Primordial #1 will be available at comic shops on Wednesday, September 15.


Pre-Order: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Almost American
« Older Entries