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Mike Mignola is Drawing Monsters in a New Documentary Being Kickstarted

Hellboy has appeared in countless graphic novels and comic books, prose novels and short story collections, acclaimed role-playing games and videogames, three live-action films and two animated features, and has inspired countless toys and collectibles. Now, award-winning Hellboy creator Mike Mignola is getting his turn in the spotlight in the all-new documentary Mike Mignola: Drawing Monsters, which tells the definitive story of one of the most influential and important comic book creators of all time. This feature-length film includes never-before-seen interviews conducted with the legendary creator at his studio, drawing demonstrations, behind-the-scenes footage from comic book conventions, and interviews with some of the most influential people in entertainment, including Neil Gaiman (American Gods), Steven Universe creator Rebecca Sugar, Victor LaValle (The Ballad Of Black Tom), artist Tara McPherson, and comic book superstars like Vita Ayala, Duncan Fegredo, Fábio Moon, and Joe Quesada. Mike Mignola: Drawing Monsters is now on Kickstarter for a month-long campaign that runs throughout March.

As one of the most successful independent comic book creators, Mignola has inspired generations of writers and artists. Mike Mignola: Drawing Monsters provides an in-depth look at his legacy, from the beginning of his career working as an inker for Marvel Comics to his success with Hellboy. The film features never-before-told revelations from Neil Gaiman about the Mignolaverse and the production of Guillermo Del Toro’s Hellboy II, and an interview with Steven Universe creator Rebecca Sugar discussing Mignola’s influence on her creation.

The documentary features Mythbusters host Adam Savage, Hellboy film actor Doug Jones and actress Vanessa Eichhotlz, novelists Christopher Golden (of the bestselling Ben Walker novels) and Victor LaValle (The Ballad Of Black Tom), Dark Horse Publisher and founder Mike Richardson, Dark Horse Editor Katii O’Brien, Marvel EVP of Creative Development Joe Quesada, comic book writers Vita Ayala (The Wilds), Chris Roberson (Hellboy & The B.P.R.D.) and Thomas Sniegoski (Young Hellboy), and award-winning cartoonist Fábio Moon (Daytripper), as well as interviews and art demonstrations with painter Jason Shawn Alexander, Duncan Fegredo (Hellboy: The Wild Hunt), Michael Avon Oeming (B.P.R.D.: The Soul Of Venice), award-winning colorist Dave Stewart and, of course, Mignola himself.

Mike Mignola: Drawing Monsters is being co-directed and produced by Jim Demonakos (founder, LightBox Expo and ECCC) and Kevin Hanna (Clockwork Girl), an American director noted for his work in feature film, animation, comic books, and television.

The Kickstarter campaign features tiers with the Mike Mignola: Drawing Monsters film digitally or on Blu-Ray, as well as a Kickstarter exclusive t-shirt, original art, a commission from Mignola himself, the opportunity to receive an executive producer credit on the film, and an incredible Hellboy Portfolio Print Set that is exclusive to the Kickstarter campaign, featuring new 9″x12″ Hellboy prints by Mignola and Dave Stewart, Laurence Campbell, Duncan Fegredo, Alex Maleev, Fábio Moon, Mike Norton, Paolo Rivera, Craig Rousseau, Tim Sale, and Ben Stenbeck. All the artists involved have previously drawn interiors for various Mignolaverse books.

Filming will continue and is scheduled to be completed in the fall/winter of 2021, with the finished film debuting by spring of 2022.

Review: Two Moons #1

Two Moons #1
Two Moons #1

War is never short on metaphors for violence, especially in terms of being represented as something that is literally monstrous. John Arcudi and Valerio Giangiordano’s Two Moons #1 is very aware of this, but the monsters that populate their version of the American Civil War seem to have been called in to help carry some deeper metaphors into the story. Surprisingly enough, what makes it through is largely concerned with the violence that always seems to follow identity and assimilation.

Two Moons #1 introduces readers to Virgil Morris, born of the Pawnee Nation and originally given the name of Two Moons. Virgil is presented as an assimilated American, a man that left his roots behind only to see them come back to claim him. Virgil starts seeing monsters, spirits, and dead men who won’t stay quiet as he fights for the Union during the Civil War. The things he sees might be all in his head, but the comic is leaning hard on making them feel very real to him.

Arcudi and Giangiordano appear to be gearing up for a slow burn of a story centered on the resurgence of Virgil’s Pawnee heritage and how it intends to remind him of who he is and who he should be, that is if it’s proven that he can trust both the mystic aspects of his process and himself, for that matter.

Giangiordano illustrates the story’s version of America as a place that’s always thirsty for blood, a place that thrives in war. The characters are presented as forces of nature that, to an extent, make them look like walking manifestations of anger and violence. This extends to the overall setting of the story, which sticks mostly to the American wilderness. Locations come off as unwelcoming and uncooperative, as places eager to be turned into battlefields.

Two Moons #1’s script focuses on introducing Virgil’s struggle with his Pawnee identity to readers, but Arcudi also takes the opportunity to introduce another character that’s coming to terms with identity and what it means to be an outsider in America: Nurse Frances Shaw, an Irish immigrant.

Two Moons #1
Two Moons #1

Nurse Frances is forming her opinion on what America is and what it stands for during one of the most unstable and uncertain moments in its history. The soul of the nation was quite simply fractured. The idea that the Civil War was a bloody and merciless fight between brothers was something people were constantly reminded of.

Negotiating one’s identity in the midst of all this inviting chaos into one’s own sense of belonging. Arcudi’s script is approaching it in a smart and intriguing way. In addition, her inclusion in the story serves as a good counter balance to Virgil’s own journey.

And then there are the monsters and all the other things that roam the wild. Giangiordano imbues each creature design with a considerable amount of storytelling. There’s a lot one can learn about them just by scanning their bodies. On a side note, they also look like they could effectively work in a film adaptation of the comic through practical make-up effects. Their designs are nightmarish but strangely realistic. They’re instantly memorable.

Two Moons #1
Two Moons #1

Two Moons is a new series with a lot of promise. It’s in a position to offer an appropriately confrontational take on what makes an American and if it’s even possible to identify anyone as such. The art is exceptional and it takes command of the story in unexpected ways. The book welcomes questions, demands thought, and values different angles. Come ready into the story or it will sneak up on you with its dark intricacies.

Script: John Arcudi Art: Valerio Giangiordano Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy and dust off your old Civil War History books!

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Batman: White Knight Presents: Harley Quinn #5

Batman: White Knight Presents: Harley Quinn #5

Written by: Katana Collins
Art by: Matteo Scalera
Color: Dave Stewart

The Producer’s scheme is in motion, and the GTO is on high alert as Gotham’s hope of a peaceful new horizon begins to collapse. Rattled and recovering from a close encounter with Starlet, Harley examines whether her complicated past with villainy is a burden or a boon to her new identity. She weighs two final options: break all ties and retire to a quiet life, or embrace the chaos, risk, and responsibility of protecting the people and the place that created her. The choice itself may be fantasy, as a targeted attack on Harley ends in tragedy and drives Bruce to a reckless decision that could extend his prison sentence indefinitely.

Batman: White Knight Presents: Harley Quinn #5

Review: Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1

Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1

I love pulp adventures and stories. There’s a fun aspect to them where you accept the over-the-top sequences and enjoy it all. Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 kicks off a “lost tale” of a young Hellboy infused with the over-the-top nature of those types of stories.

On their way to South America, Hellboy and Professor Bruttenholm are stranded on a strange island after their plane crashes. The mysterious island is full of the crazy experiences and dangers you’d expect. From giant crabs to attacking gorillas, Hellboy and Bruttenholm must figure out where they are and how to survive.

With a story by Mike Mignola and Thomas Sniegoski, Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 is a solid read that you can just pick up and enjoy. It bathes itself in the moments you’d expect from this type of story. It takes its inspiration from the old reels and films full of adventure. It’s the type of story where the action is the focus and the “what” isn’t quite the focus at all. You just roll with what’s thrown at you and enjoy the ride.

Mignola and Sniegoski fills the issue with enthusiasm with a young Hellboy that’s full of excitement. Like a kid of that age, he wants to know what’s going on with glee. A lot of the fun comes from that aspect and it brings a bit of youthful energy to the comic.

Craig Rousseau‘s art is great. Dave Stewart provides colors with lettering by Clem Robins. Much like the story itself, the visuals feel a bit over the top. Things feel exaggerated in a good way adding to the fun aspect of it all. Hellboy comics can fall into the horror genre in both stories and visuals but this issue brings a bit of the lighter side of things.

Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 is an entertaining comic. It’s one you can just pick up and enjoy without having to know anything about the world or character. It shares a lot of its DNA with adventures like Flash Gordon, Indiana Jones, and Tarzan. There’s an aspect where it doesn’t take itself too seriously and knows exactly what it wants to be and that’s a lot of fun.

Story: Mike Mignola, Thomas Sniegoski Art: Craig Rousseau
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Clem Robins
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 (of 4)

Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 (of 4)

(W) Mike Mignola, Thomas Sniegoski (A) Craig Rousseau (C) Dave Stewart (CA) Matt Smith
In Shops: Feb 17, 2021
SRP: $3.99

Stranded on a strange island after a mishap on their way to a South American dig site, Hellboy and Professor Bruttenholm are confronted by all manner of monsters! But even when the stranger who rescues them turns out to be one of Hellboy’s heroes, they aren’t as safe as they think they are!

Join Hellboy creator Mike Mignola as he teams with writer Tom Sniegoski, artist Craig Rousseau, and colorist Dave Stewart to bring you a tale of Hellboy’s childhood!

Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 (of 4)

Ultramega #1 Gets Variants from Tradd Moore and James Harren

James Harren’s highly anticipated Ultramega is getting two new variant covers for issue #1. The upcoming kaiju action series will slam into stores with a 60-page debut, now with additional black and white covers from Tradd Moore and Harren himself.

In addition to announcing the new covers, Image Comics and Skybound have unveiled the previously announced Tradd Moore color variant.

In the world of Ultramega, a cosmic plague has spread and transformed everyday people into violent, monstrous kaiju. Only the Ultramega—three individuals imbued with incredible powers—hold the line against this madness. Their battles level cities and leave untold horror in their wake. Now, the final reckoning approaches for the Ultramega… but is this a war they can even win?

Ultramega #1 will be available at comic book shops and digital platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, comiXology, and Google Play on Wednesday, March 17:

  • Ultramega by James Harren #1 Cover A by Harren – JAN210038
  • Ultramega By James Harren #1 Cover B by Moore – JAN210039
  • Ultramega By James Harren #1 Cover C Blank cover – JAN210040
  • Ultramega By James Harren #1 Cover D Raw (1:5 Copy Incentive) by Moore – DEC209206
  • Ultramega By James Harren #1 Cover E Raw (1:10 Copy Incentive) by Harren – DEC209207

James Harren is the creator, writer, and artist of Ultramega, with Eisner award winning colorist Dave Stewart.

Review: Rorschach #4

Rorschach #4

Rorschach as a whole has been an interesting series so far. While it’s draw is its tie-in to Watchmen, remove that, you have a pretty solid political thriller. With an attempted Presidential assassination having been stopped, a detective does what he can to uncover the why of it all and the individuals who were stopped, one being Rorschach. The other is the focus of Rorschach #4. Who was the person behind the domino mask? Rorschach #4 attempts to answer some of that.

Writer Tom King uses the issue to shed some light on Rorschach’s partner in crime. He uses the rather common framing of a police interrogation. Laura’s story is told from the perspective of a friend with whom she spent time in a circus.

Rorschach #4 sheds some light on the mysterious character though leaving a lot to open. It’s a very smart dive into characters and their motivations. But, more importantly, the issue is an examination of falling into a fantasy. How easy it is to be propped up and manipulated. How easy it is to be disconnected from reality. The issue is an examination in some ways of our modern times and how easy it is to commit horrific acts when in the enthrall of another.

There’s also a nice examination of conspiracies and how easy it is to fall into and believe, “fake news”. We get a new theory as to what happened to the heroes at the end of Watchmen and why. Mixed in with the television series, it’s all very interesting together.

King also throws in a lot to muddy up what we’ve been told before by what’s revealed. What’s really going on with Rorschach? Who was the person under the mask in the first issue? Is what we’ve been told true? Things are a bit up in the air right now.

Jorge Fornés‘ art continues to impress. Though the clothing and style still screams 70s, there’s so much here to take in. This is a psychological comic. There’s not tons of action. But Fornés keeps the visuals engaging and interesting. With Dave Stewart‘s colors and lettering by Clayton Cowles, Rorschach #4 is muted in some way. It’s not dour but a bit sad as we learn about an individual who was in love and led down a dark path by someone not attached to reality.

Rorschach #4 is an interesting comic. It’s a piece of a bigger puzzle that teases the bigger picture. It’s also a hell of a compact story taking place in an interrogation room. The team has put together what feels like a two-person play in comic form.

Story: Tom King Art: Jorge Fornés
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Post Americana #1

Post Americana #1

Steve Skroce‘s last project begins with Post Americana #1 taking us to a place called the Bubble and it’s a hulking installation built into a Colorado mountain, housing many of the 1%. One of them is to be the new leader of the United States but others have some different ideas. After bombing the inauguration, an escape happens, though short-lived, as they crash into the wastelands, the housing of various raiders and cannibals.

Post Americana #1 is a beautiful book to look at. I’ve been a fan of Steve Skroce for quite some time and really dug the last couple of projects he worked on, like Maestros and We Stand On Guard. Like Maestros, Skroce put in double time on this, doing both the writing and art. Skroce is at the top of his game, delivering page-after-page of highly-detailed artwork. His style is just about my favorite thing to look at.

Dave Stewart definitely adds another level of awesomeness with his colors. They go together well. It helps sell the image of a blade going through someone’s head or various mutated wasteland folks.  And besides the art, Skroce is a pretty good storyteller. If I had to nitpick, I’d say the dialogue is the weakest part of Post Americana #1.

A comic book like Post Americana #1 might draw readers in with its art but it is a pretty good story with an adequate balance of action and humor. If you read Skroce’s previous Image Comics book Maestros, you’ll like this as much, too.

Story: Steve Skroce Art: Steve Skroce Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 7.0 Art: 10 Overall: 8.5

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy review


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Review: Post Americana #1

Post Americana #1

Post Americana #1 is a new entry in the apocalyptic post-America genre that feels like it’s in vogue right now. Steve Skroce does double duty in a debut issue that left me cheering for the bad guy.

In this world a disaster strikes forcing America’s leaders and their rich supporters to head to an underground bunker. But, the elected officials and heads of the government didn’t make it leaving just the rich to run the show. Now, years later, one person has come forward with a vision of re-uniting the United States.

Skroce delivers an interesting idea and concept. The idea of the rich taking over the nation completely and using it to rebuild in their vision is an interesting one. Unfortunately, what’s presented to start has be cheering them on.

After a daring escape from the bunker by those opposing the current leadership, we’re slowly introduced to what’s outside. What exists is a weird combination of Mad Max and other horrors, not exactly anyone you’d sympathize with. Beyond murder chickens there’s murdering rapists and murdering cannibals. We’re not presented with anyone we should be cheering to take on a stand. What’s hinted at beyond the initial two groups doesn’t sound much better since both seem to kneel to an unknown warlord. Everyone seems to be a bad guy and maybe that’s a point. There’s just a whole lot of bad directions and possibilities.

Skroce’s art is entertaining to look at and there’s a lot of creativity to the world. The style is very unique and stands out along with Dave Stewart‘s colors that make it all pop. There’s a lot of thought to the history of the world. Every character presented tells a story by themselves. It also opens up a lot of questions too as a society with such wonders has fallen into disarray and apparently, no one has used the technology to do much since.

Post Americana #1 delivers a good amount of action and some interesting concepts but as a whole has presented a lot of bad guys and no one to cheer on. Why wouldn’t I want a government to restore order when cannibals are running about? Where is the part of society that’s functioning and I’m supposed to care about? None of it is presented and none of it is really hinted at. For once, I’m hoping the 1% wins.

Story: Steve Skroce Art: Steve Skroce
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Fonografiks
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.95 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Rorschach #3

Rorschach #3

Written by: Tom King
Art by: Jorge Fornes

In an instant, 15 million people are dead! What happens when the human psyche is forced to accept such a devastating truth? Follow the story of “the Kid,” a radicalized, gun-toting performer and the right-hand woman of the new Rorschach. See how this masked woman grows from an innocent child to the would-be cold-blooded assassin of a presidential candidate. This detective thriller will unravel the mysteries behind the assassination attempt and reveal how the struggles of these killers connect to larger turmoils of the world. Eisner Award-winning writer Tom King delves into the desperation that leads to radicalization and the questions that can lead a person into violence. Featuring art by new sensation Jorge Fornes with acclaimed colorist Dave Stewart.

Rorschach #3
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