Tag Archives: craig thompson

Review: Ginseng Roots #11

Ginseng Roots #11 continues Craig Thompson’s journey in China in the penultimate issue.

It continues to focus on Thompson’s creation of the comic itself and more research in Korea and China. At the same time, it focuses on Thompson’s own family and his relationship with his brother.

Story: Craig Thompson
Art: Craig Thompson

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Zeus Comics
Uncivilized Books


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Review: Ginseng Roots #9

Ginseng Roots #9 pivots a bit focusing on two major ginseng farms in Wisconsin and the political decisions that impact them.

Story: Craig Thompson
Art: Craig Thompson

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Zeus Comics
Uncivilized Books


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Ginseng Roots #8

Ginseng Roots #8

When it come sot fulfilling your promise, it is never more ingrained than in immigrant families. My own family, came with their own set of challenges, and those pressures transferred to their children, me and my cousins. We were often told to either go to medicine or law. Like many families but it feels as though they had the pressures of the “old country” on us. The audacity of hoping for a better life for you, your family and maybe, being part of this “American dream”, is what pushes so many of us to do better.

It is often in that push to do better than those who came before, that the struggle of living within the “hyphen” becomes suddenly apparent. As it is usually the generation who is born into the new country, who finds themselves often conflicted. They are both a child of immigrants and someone born to this nation they have always known as their home. In Ginseng Roots #8, Craig Thompson takes a look at a particular Hmong family and find out just how important legacy is.

Within this issue we find about Chua and Chua’s family, as we soon find out how the cultural differences lead to his father being named Abraham, because the Mennonites who lived there, never anyone who was not white, but eventually adopted the name for religious reasons and also, to assimilate. Chua would work the fields with his Dad every day after school, but after Junior year, he would drop out,  and he would eventually take over the family business, as that became all he knew. By the issue’s end, we get a full exploration of who Chua is and just how important his Dad, Abraham, was to him and to this community.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #8 is an issue which will remind many Minari, but is much more heartfelt, because this true story. The story by Thompson is authentic. The art by Thompson is incredible. Altogether, Chua’s journey shows sometimes legacy finds its way to you.

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Zeus ComicsUncivilized Books

Fantastic Four, Giant-Size Marvel, Hercules, and More are New on comiXology

There’s eight new releases available now on comiXology. You can get new comics from Marvel, Harlequin, and Tidalwave Productions. Get shopping now or check out the individual issues below.

Fantastic Four: Clobberin’ Time

Written by Todd DeZago
Art by Michael O’Hare
Cover by Randy Green
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Collects Marvel Age: Fantastic Four Tales #1, Tales Of The Thing #1-3 And Spider-Man Team-Up Special (2005) #1. Check out the Thing and the rest of his Fantastic Four pals in their latest collection of all-ages adventures! Each of these four action-packed stories features a special guest from the Mighty Marvel Universe. Join the Black Panther, Dr. Strange and other heroes as they combine forces with the Thing for this contemporary spin on classic Marvel tales.

Fantastic Four: Clobberin' Time

Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules

Written by James Sturm
Art by Guy Davis, James Sturm
Cover by Craig Thompson
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Collects Startling Stories: Fantastic Four – Unstable Molecules #1-4. In 1961 the first issue of THE FANTASTIC FOUR was drawn and written by the brilliant team of Jack Kirby and Stan Lee and set a new standard for heroic adventure comics. Few people realize that the Fantastic Four — a family of sci-fi adventurers gifted with amazing powers — were actually based on the lives of real people. As often is the case, real life was as astonishing as fiction. UNSTABLE MOLECULES is a biography that revisits the Fantastic Four’s beginnings with a historian’s eye.

Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules

Giant-Size Marvel

Written by Gerry Conway, Steve Gerber, Tony Isabella, Donald McGregor, Roger Slifer, Roy Thomas, Len Wein
Art by Rich Buckler, John Buscema, Dave Cockrum, Don Heck, Gil Kane, Don Perlin, Frank Robbins
Cover by John Romita Sr.
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Collects Giant-Size Fantastic Four #4; Giant-Size Avengers #1; Giant-Size Defenders #4; Giant-Size Super-Heroes #1, Giant-Size Invaders #1; Giant-Size X-Men #1, Giant-Size Creatures #1. Giants roamed the Earth in those days, and now they’re back! Witness the formation of the new X-Men and the old Invaders! The rapid return of the wartime runner called the Whizzer! The debut of the multiplying Marvel Knight Madrox! Spider-Man vs. the Man-Wolf! The Defenders vs. the Squadron Sinister! The tantalizing Tigra and more! Tales almost too tall to tell, together in a titanic tome!

Giant-Size Marvel

Hercules: The New Labors Of Hercules

Written by Frank Tieri
Art by Mark Texeira
Cover by Mark Texeira
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Collects Hercules (2005) #1-5. Reeling from the tragic death of Thor, the Prince of Power knows his star is fading fast. So what better way to pump up his Q-rating than to relive his defining moment? When his most bitter foe throws down the gauntlet, Hercules agrees to the challenge: twelve labors, each more perilous than the one before it — and each updated for reality-TV consumption. Zounds!

Hercules: The New Labors Of Hercules

Partenaire en amour

Written by Jessica Hart
Art by Marito Ai
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Darcy a fait le voyage depuis Londres pour visiter Bindaburra Ranch, une propriété que lui a léguée son grand-oncle. Sur sa route vers le ranch, sa voiture tombe en panne et elle se voit contrainte de continuer à pied sur ses talons dans une campagne qu’elle ne connaît pas. Juste au moment où elle commençait à désespérer, un homme nommé Cooper arrive dans sa voiture et la sauve. Mais Cooper déclare qu’il est le propriétaire de Bindaburra. Cooper essayait-il de profiter du décès de son grand-oncle pour accaparer le ranch que son oncle aimait tant ?

Partenaire en amour

Un mariage par nécessité

Written by Christine Rimmer
Art by Kuremi Hazama
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Le père de Megan avait stipulé dans son testament qu’elle devait se marier dans les deux ans et avoir un enfant, sous peine de perdre la propriété de la ferme d’élevage. Désormais, elle doit trouver un mari, au plus vite ! Pour cela, elle se bat pour rencontrer son ami d’enfance Nathan Bravo. Alors qu’ils ont grandi ensemble, il a quitté la ville il y a longtemps pour y pratiquer la médecine vétérinaire. À présent, douze ans plus tard, Megan est décidée à lui demander de l’épouser !

Un mariage par nécessité

Welcome to Waterbury #2

Written by Dan Rafter
Art by Byron L. Golden
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Chapter 2: The Devil You Know. Living in Waterbury in an aging inn wasn’t Audrey’s dream. It was her husbands. But now her husband is dead, and Audrey is the only one who thinks it wasn’t an accident. She’s also the only one who thinks the scarecrows scattered throughout the town have been moving. What’s really going on in Waterbury? Audrey’s about to find out.

Welcome to Waterbury #2

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: Ginseng Roots #7

Ginseng Roots #7

The journey of immigrants across the world and their contributions to society are far-ranging and prolific. The need to emphasize this point is one that seems to need to be reinforced during the pandemic. In America, xenophobia and nativism have suddenly become synonymous with what it means to be part of the national identity. This, of course, is not isolated to the United States, but seemingly everywhere, making BIPOC understandably cautious.

As people who were once welcome to shores worldwide were now being looked at as burdens. What is strangely true is that no country on earth would thrive without outside influence. Just about every modern innovation has its ties back to immigrants or people of color. In Ginseng Roots #7, Craig Thompson gives readers another reveal, of the first family to harvest ginseng in America, who just so happens to be Hmong.

We find the Thompson siblings who come to the realization that their Saturday’s watching cartoons were no more and they would have to spend their weekends working the ginseng gardens with 30-50 other workers, of whom half were Hmong immigrants. One of those workers, Chua, we find out that his family was one of the first to harvest ginseng in America and definitely the first to harvest in Wisconsin. As Thompson regales the reader on the long and arduous journey the Hmong people have had to face, being displaced everywhere they settled from China to eventually aid to America in their fight in Vietnam.  We also find a bit of back-story about Chua’s family, how they never felt at home wherever they went and how it took a family in Tennessee to sponsor his, for their journey to come to America. By the issue’s end, Thompson gains an appreciation of his friend, Chua but ultimately, the immigrant journey.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #7 is an issue which shows just how many people this one root affects. The story by Thompson is genuine. The art by Thompson is amazing. Altogether, Thompson imbues Chua to the reader and gives an utterly compelling look at refugees.

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Uncivilized Books

Review: Ginseng Roots #6

Ginseng Roots #6

The older I get, the more I appreciate my surroundings. When I say surroundings, I especially mean working in my garden. When I see my neighbors work in their gardens as well, I often ponder the meaning of life in my solace. This is usually where I come up with some great ideas for stories and even books, as I frequently find something I truly come to endear, peace.

As I watch my plants and grass grow, the fruits and vegetables come to bear. Often in writing, we like to compare the seasons to growing up. As cliché as it is, it’s so very true. You can even compare it to raising children as time is all you have in abundance and in short supply. In Ginseng Roots #6, Craig Thompson gives readers a fascinating parallel, where we see the ginseng grow, as he grows up.

We find the Thompson siblings working the ginseng gardens, as we get a quick and dirty lesson in the stratification process, one that resembles their eagerness for the school year to end. As Thompson guides the reader through their home life, and how each individual Thompson sibling was treated, where they endured strict discipline from their father and they had one on one time with their mother and their collective love of books. He also goes onto giving the reader a lesson in how the sterilization procedure and interestingly compares it to when he and his siblings being baptized, as the family becomes even more tethered to the church, Craig starts seeing just how they demonize things they don’t understand. By the issue’s end, Thompson’s parents because of the church’s influence, make the decision that secular education is sinful, dividing the siblings for the first time in their lives.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #6 is a very personal issue that gives the reader more insight into the dynamics of the Thompson family. The story by Thompson is authentic. The art by Thompson is spectacular. Altogether, Thompson makes you feel like you are eavesdropping but makes you feel right at home with the Thompsons.

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Uncivilized BooksZeus Comics

Review: Ginseng Roots #5

Ginseng Roots #5

How we use the soil beneath our feet says a lot about humankind. Humans have toiled the land for our sustenance. This fact makes the future bleak, as this skillset is slowly disappearing and fewer and fewer farmers exist. Industrialization has made this profession an option but it’s still a necessity for our future.

Unfortunately what happens is that the world tilts to big corporations and the world of farming has gone this way as well. Family-based farmers are slowly becoming a thing of the past. The tradition goes back further than most people would even know. In Ginseng Roots #5, Craig Thompson gives readers another lesson in history. It’s one that shows how early Americans ate off the land.

We find the Thompson siblings visiting their neighbor, Bear, who also owns a Ginseng farm, as we soon find out it has been with his family for a very long time, going back to when the French first came to America and started to trade with the Native Americans. As Thompson eventually tells the reader of the Beaver Wars, where the French, Dutch and indigenous peoples fought each other to reap profits off of the natural resources that the land yielded and how it lead to the Treaty Du Chen which divided the state of Wisconsin amongst the tribes and designated plots of land for white settlement. We also find out how the Great Depression and the age of industrialization where the introduction of chemicals into soil gave a crushing blow to what were Ginseng empires all throughout Wisconsin, as the rule of Chairman Mao, changed China’s trade agreement in 1950 from agricultural to industrial, making the need for Ginseng from America almost obsolete. It was not until 1970, where the American Ginseng industry got revived, but one dependent on the chemicals that the big corporations mass-produced. By the issue’s end, Thompson introduces us to his other love after comics, guns, one which allowed him to find himself.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #5 is a mesmerizing issue that is a pure master class. The story by Thompson is genuine. The art by Thompson is breathtaking. Altogether, Thompson gives the reader, a class in geopolitics.

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Uncivilized BooksZeus Comics

Review: Ginseng Roots #4

Ginseng Roots #4

As a native of New York, I have seen the city change over the years. My neighborhood changed demographics within waves of five to ten years. It went from being influential to the middle class. Then right after I joined the military, it went through one more transformation, gentrification.

Neighbors whom I knew for a lifetime, lost their homes. It wasn’t lost on me that this was part of the larger machine. As it is with the “Haves and Have Nots”, those with money have choices. Those who don’t are at somebody’s will.  In the years since then, it has increasingly more prevalent and pervasive, with no urgency for equity. In Ginseng Roots #4, Craig Thompson gives readers another dimension to gentrification, as he illuminates the reader on how it affects rural communities.

We find the Thompson siblings visiting an old friend, Rollie, whom they work for in the summers they did not work the Ginseng gardens. There they did even more grueling work, rock picking. The reader soon finds out just how crucial the work was to pruning ginseng, and how it helped the different Ginseng farmers. The reader eventually finds out there are a plethora of different types of ginseng roots, and all of them are used differently, even inspiring some childhood friends to make Ginseng beer. By the issue’s end, Thompson tethers his childhood experiences to the concept that ginseng is more than root to him and the people he loves.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #4 is a fascinating issue that illuminates while it educates. The story by Craig Thompson is authentic. The art by Thompson is wonderful. Altogether, Thompson gives the reader an issue that focuses on something that matters.

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Uncivilized Books

Review: Ginseng Roots #3

Ginseng Roots #3

As a fan of Star Wars, what I loved about the books before Lucasfilm Story Group was that they filled those gaps. Many of the books that came between the original trilogy and when they were bought by Disney were monumental. As it brought to life those characters in ways not even the current canon has satisfied. My favorite being Heir To The Empire.

What I also loved were the comics that came from Dark Horse. One of the immensely heralded comics was Dawn Of The Jedi. As it introduced to first ones to be called as such, and how their pillars of faith came into being. As the book answered all those questions, us Star Wars nerds wanted to know.  In Ginseng Roots #3, Craig Thompson does the same, answering those questions about why the world has come to depend on this particular root for all its needs.

Thompson dives into the metaphysical origins of the root, introducing us to the # Sovereigns, in Chinese mythology, relaying the legend of Shennong and how the Father Of Medicine discovered its purpose. We also find out about “Ginseng Hunters:, who would  scavenge forests for this “God root”, as it enhance one’s own “Qi ( life force) . We also find Craig back home, enjoying all its comforts, as we get a front row seat at the International Ginseng Festival.  By issue’s end, Thompson gives us a concise history of the root and even gives a mini solo adventure, with his brother, Phil.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #3 is a special issue that educates the reader. The story by Thompson is genuine. The art by Thompson is outstanding. Altogether, Thompson gives the reader, a complete rundown of why this root is important.   

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Ginseng Roots #2

Ginseng Roots #2

One of my favorite shows of all time is the short-lived October Road. The series focused on a famous writer who goes back home and suffers the wrath of the town and its people he wrote about. The show only lasted two seasons and suffered from extended episode count fatigue. The story’s premise remained undeniable nonetheless.

It dove into why writing any autobiography can ultimately be problematic. As the intention is everything, but so is perception. Ultimately, it is how you make those people feel when you write about them, is what the main character learned right away. In Ginseng Roots #2, Craig Thompson returns home and introduces us to the people who made those summers.

We find our author flying back home to Wisconsin, where Marathon is hosting the first-ever International Ginseng Festival. We also meet our author’s sister, who was omitted from his previous work, but shares the same memories as her brothers, toiling day after day in the Ginseng gardens, but had a wholly different experience, as she often felt solitude, away from her brothers, an issue the family finds difficult to deal with at present. We also meet Harold and Judy, their neighbors who once were some of the biggest Ginseng farmers in the area, and who employed the family, to only quit because of the changing nature of the soil. By the issue’s end, we get a more complete picture of who our narrator is and what lead him to write this immensely entertaining and affecting book.

Overall, Ginseng Roots #2 is a personal issue that brings home the struggle of the working class. The story by Thompson is heartfelt. The art by Thompson is prominent and engaging. Altogether, Thompson much like Nick Garrett in October Road finds that sometimes going gives us the reason to aspire for more.  

Story: Craig Thompson Art: Craig Thompson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Uncivilized BooksTFAW

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