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Review: War of the Realms Omega #1

War of the Realms Omega #1

War of the Realms: Omega #1 is not so much a full epilogue story to the “War of the Realms” event as a tasting menu for the various spinoffs that come after it. Kudos to Marvel for putting these in their own comic instead of stepping on Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matthew Wilson’s literal thunder as they hit the high point of Aaron’s Thor epic. With one last omniscient conversation between Daredevil and Heimdall as a framing narrative, Omega #1 tells the story of Jane Foster, Loki, and Punisher while setting up Jane Foster Valkyrie #1, Loki #1, and Punisher Kill Krew #1.

Even if it’s mostly just a conversation between Daredevil and Heimdall, the framing narrative of Omega #1 is a fantastic conclusion to Daredevil’s struggles with godhood that Jason Aaron penned in War Scrolls. It’s also reunion of one of my favorite recent Daredevil art teams of Ron Garney and Matt Milla, who transform the look of their framing narrative from fantasy to street level as Daredevil goes from talking about gods, prayers, and Valhalla to stopping a mugger with the help of some Yggdrasil forged fighting sticks. Aaron also brings up some interesting ideas like Daredevil’s guilt about his own faith and beliefs making him a good God of Fear that protected Midgard in their direst need. It connects to his recent writing of Thor that the best god isn’t one that fights for the mantle, but acknowledges the responsibility that is thrust upon him.

The first story in Omega #1 features Jane Foster and the Valkyries in a morgue where she hopes to help find them some peace and is written by Aaron and Al Ewing with art from Cafu and Jesus Aburtov. Jane interacts with Lisa, who used to date the superhero America Chavez, and they both can empathize on what it’s like to be connected to someone with so much power and be ordinary. It’s a nice human interaction before a beautiful transformation sequence where Jane takes on the responsibility of reopening Valhalla and finding rest for the Asgardians. Cafu’s art is clean and photorealistic, but not too stiff while Aburtov’s colors are bright, glossy, but a little sad. Jane played a major role in “War of the Realms”, and it’ll be nice to see her as headliner for a little bit in her own series that looks to continue to play on Aaron’s themes of faith and belief that he has explored throughout his Thor comics.

On the more mischievous side, there is a story starring Loki and his undersized Frost Giant buddy Drrf from Daniel Kibblesmith, Oscar Bazaldua, and David Curiel. As evidenced by his work on Valiant High, Lockjaw, and Deadpool vs. Black Panther, Kibblesmith excels at combining comics continuity with funny and genuinely heartfelt moments. And there are a few of those in this short story as Loki takes a young Frost Giant under his wing after he spots the little guy using a stew pot lid as a sled. Bazaldua’s cartoon-y style visuals are a good fit for this book and capture Loki’s every smirk and glint of mischief in his eye. He earned the role of king of Frost Giants by killing his father, but it will be difficult to keep the respect of this murderous and cannibalistic realm. However, adding Drrf to the equation keeps the tone of the story light and not super serious in a Game of Thrones kind of way.

The final Omega #1 short story is a Punisher one, from Gerry Duggan and the fantastic Juan Ferreyra that shows that the War of the Realms never really ended for one person: Frank Castle. Castle is barbecuing stray Helhounds with a flamethrower, breaking up Asgardian revelry with semi-automatic gun fire, and making sure the inhabitants of Midgard don’t loot in the post-War chaos. His mission of vengeance towards criminals has expanded from mortals to fantasy beings thanks to the losses suffered by the people, and especially the children of New York, during the War. However, the real star of the Punisher story isn’t the brooding revenge or monster becomes monster hunter narrative book, but Ferreyra’s art, which he colors himself and has a Steve Dillon meets Heavy Metal vibe. The combination of melodramatic dialogue and captions and over the top violence is a winner.

War of the Realms Omega #1 accomplished what it set out do, which is to pique my interest in the upcoming Jane Foster, Loki, and Punisher comic book series that are spinning out of the event. The artists for these books are especially well-cast, and Cafu’s beautiful take on Jane Foster’s transformation from mortal to Valkyrie was the highlight of this entire one-shot. Also, Juan Ferreyra is such an underrated artist, and I’m excited to see his take on creative fantasy monster executions.

Story: Jason Aaron, Al Ewing, Daniel Kibblesmith, Gerry Duggan
 Art: Ron Garney, Cafu, Oscar Bazaldua, Juan Ferreyra
 Colors: Matt Milla, Jesus Aburtov, David Curiel
Letters: Joe Sabino, Clayton Cowles, Cory Petit
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dead Man Logan Vol. 1 Sins of the Father

Old Man Logan is dying and before he goes he wants to make sure his nightmarish future doesn’t happen.

Dead Man Logan Vol. 1 Sins of the Father collects issues #1-6.

Story: Ed Brisson
Art: Mike Henderson
Color: Nolan Woodard
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores on June 25! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: X-Force #9

X-Force #9

X-Force is in a tough place attempted to fight Stryfe’s forces and also rescue Kid Cable! X-Force #9 delivers the penultimate chapter in Ed Brisson epic X-storyline.

Brisson has been weaving a solid follow up to his Extermination storyline taking us further into the world of Kid Cable as well as the fate of Rachel Summers. For longtime readers of the X-Universe, the jump to the future has been fun giving us a further glimpse as to what’s to come.

Brisson brings the humor in X-Force #9. It’s been a highlight of his run as he mixes violence with laughs. From Boom Boom punching a frozen enemy to Shatterstar trying not to kill anyone, there’s enough to enjoy the action. It’ll all put a smile on one’s face. Humor really seems to be Brisson’s focus with this series. Every character has their moment to deliver something that’ll get you to laugh. It’s a throwback in many ways to action films of the 80s with their quips to make it all a bit more “cool.”

The art in the issue improves with just one artist focused on the action. Dylan Burnett is joined by Jesus Aburtov on color and Cory Petit on lettering. The result is a more consistent look to the comic removing a problem present from the previous issue. The art still has its very stylized look which some might not like. But, the style adds to the humor of the series delivering over the top action.

X-Force #9 delivers as it not only has Domino and her team taking the fight to Stryfe but also Rachel stepping up in a major way. The end of the issue should have X-fans excited to see what comes next and where Brisson is taking his contribution to X-Men history.

Story: Ed Brisson Art: Dylan Burnett
Color: Jesus Aburtov Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1

Betty Ross is dead and Bruce Banner is suicidal and has an assassin waiting for his signal to end his life. It’s a touching and emotional issue that reunites Peter David and Dale Keown.

Story: Peter David
Art: Dale Keown
Ink: Mark Farmer, Marc Deering, Walden Wong, Scott Hanna
Color: Peter Steigerwald, John Starr
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Avengers Vol. 3 War of the Vampires

Blade has joined the Avengers as a war has broken out within the Vampire nation and Dracula has gone missing!

The Avengers Vol. 3 War of the Vampires includes issues #13-17.

Story: Jason Aaron
Art: Andrea Sorrentino, David Marquez
Color: Justin Ponsor, Erick Arciniega
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores on June 18! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1

The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1

The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1 is a celebration of two creators who have had a massive impact on the character. It re-teams writer Peter David with artist Dale Keown for an oversized one-shot that packs a punch.

Bruce Banner is tired of being the Hulk. Heck, he’s tired of being. Taking place after the death of Betty Ross, Banner is broken and wants the pain to end. He’s debating if he should remain in this world and contemplating suicide. Not so much contemplating as Banner has tried it multiple times. But, now he has a plan that might work. But, instead of pulling the trigger right away, he reaches out to a help line.

David delivers a story focused on Banner’s ups and downs. It’s a “this is your life” type tail going through his history, both good and bad. All the time he’s contemplating if he should continue on.

The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1 is a tough read. The comic’s a rough emotional ride focused on depression and loss. But, that’s also where the comic soars. It creates an emotional impact in the reader and when art can impact you like that, it’s a success.

The art by Keown has ups and downs. For the most part it’s dazzling and engaging. But, it’s clear Keown’s strength is the monster himself. So, when presented with Banner, things just aren’t as impressive. What’s interesting is that Keown forgoes the expected splash pages and full page spreads to let us soak in the Hulk. Instead the art matches the emotional tone with a subdued style to it all. It’s more emotional horror than monster. The art also has a lot of inkers and colorists and the shift is noticeable. None of it enough so to hamper the issue. But, it is something that sticks out while reading the comic. Keown’s work still holds up though. The art brings home the emotional story David has put together adding a depressing tone to it all through the art style and look.

The comic is an emotional one that needs a trigger warning to start. It’ll impact you at an emotional level and that’s a good thing. When art hits you at that level, it’s a success. The Incredible Hulk: Last Call #1 is a comic you may want to grab a box of kleenex while reading. These two are still a hell of a team and hopefully we get some more down the road.

Story: Peter David Art: Dale Keown
Ink: Mark Farmer, Marc Deering, Walden Wong, Scott Hanna
Color: Peter Steigerwald, John Starr Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 8.1 Art: 7.65 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: X-Force Vol. 1 Sins of the Past

Kid Cable is out there and X-Force wants answers. Domino, Cannonball, Shatterstar, Boom-Boom, and Warpath are on his trail to get them. Then there’ Deathlok too!?

X-Force Vol. 1 Sins of the Past collects issues #1-5.

Story: Ed Brisson
Art: Dylan Burnett, Juanan Ramírez, Damian Couceiro
Color: Jesus Aburtov, Brian Reber
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops nowand book stores in June 11! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: X-Force #8

X-Force #8

In X-Force #8, the team heads to the future! What type of future is it?

There’s a lot I’ve liked about writer Ed Brisson‘s run on X-Force. X-Force #8 features the expected fun interaction of the team and action you’d want. But, the art hurts Brisson’s rollercoaster ride.

The team gets to the future and with time travel being the focus, the fun confusion you’d expect is all present. It’s all the set up for a battle between X-Force and the Mutant Liberation Army which is pretty solid as far as action. There’s also the suffering of Kid Cable and his out of control techno-virus. That too is revisited a bit with some interesting results that has me wanting to see where it goes.

All of that would be great and fun but inconsistent art drags it down.

Dylan Burnett handles the art with Jesus Aburtov on colors and Cory Petit lettering. Normally, I’ve enjoyed the art on the series. It’s different with a Samurai Jack feel about it. That style made the comic stand out in a good way. But, this issue, things go off the rails a bit and now the art stands out… but in a not so good way. I have no idea where the blame lies but there’s some serious issues with lines and inking.

The first few pages with Aliya and Kid Cable have Aliya looking like she’s cell shaded. The thick black lines are a distraction as the style is so different than the rest of the comic. Look at the detail of Kid Cable’s virus for example. The thin lines versus Aliya’s thick in panels next to each other create an early distraction. That carries over for the rest of the comic where that difference isn’t as present.

While the issue is just one piece of the puzzle, it’s an issue that stands out for the inconsistent art. Thankfully Brisson continues to deliver the action and fun dialogue, a nice distraction that has me coming back for the next issue.

Story: Ed Brisson Art: Dylan Burnett
Color: Jesus Aburtov Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 8.0 Art: 5.0 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Shatterstar: Reality Star

Shatterstar has gone from warrior to super managing a building filled with refugees from across the multiverse. But, he needs to grab his swords again when his tenants are kidnaped.

Story: Tim Seeley
Art: Carlos Villa, Gerardo Sandoval
Ink: Juan Vlasco, Carlos Villa
Color: Carlos Lopez
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: War Of The Realms: Punisher #1

War Of The Realms: Punisher #1

PUNISHER: AVENGER OF MIDGARD!

The War of The Realms has brought monsters to the streets of New York City, but New York has a monster all its own…Frank Castle, A.K.A. THE PUNISHER! And he’ll be damned to Hel if he’s going to let a bunch of Ten Realms tin-pot tyrants terrorize his town. But given he’s one man against an army of monsters, Hel might soon have him! The War of Realms is about to meet Marvel’s One Man Army. Expect Punishment!

It has been a long time since I’ve bothered to read any of the spin off series that a Marvel event usually produces, but lately I’ve been on a bit of a Punisher kick (almost entirely due to the Netflix series), and so despite not having read either of the first two issues of War Of The Realms, I decided to pick this issue up.

I can honestly say that you don’t need to have read anything regarding the main series to enjoy this book because once the Punisher starts fighting giants and dark elves nothing else matters other than his surly one-liners and the explosive actions as Frank Castle shows the forces of Malekith why you don’t mess with New York and innocent lives.

There isn’t a whole lot of depth to this book, though there is an interesting scene with Frank on a bus that playing into your expectations of the Punisher. Instead, Gerry Duggan focuses on giving the reader something that we can all get behind; a really fun comic.

After decades of watching the Punisher battler monsters in human form, with War Of The Realms: Punisher #1 we’re treated to him shooting literal monsters. It’s not quite a fish out of water tale, as Frank seems more resigned to his current task than overwhelmed by the nature of the enemy he faces which leads to the previously mentioned dry one-liners.

The comic is drawn by Marcelo Ferreira with inks by Roberto Poggi and colours provided by Rachelle Rosenberg. The trio give the comic a clean style that conveys the weight and gravitas of the situation without ever coming off as cheesy (which would be an easy trap to fall into , given the nature of the story.

When it comes down to this comic, and its place in the greater arc, I assume it fits in, but seeing as how this can be read independently to the main series, there’s no real excuse for fan of the Punisher to pick this book up and enjoy the book you’re reading.

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Marcelo Ferreira
Inks: Roberto Poggi Colours: Rachelle Rosenberg Letters: Cory Petit
Story: 8.1 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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