Tag Archives: #comicsforward

NYCC 2015: 451 Media Releases Graphic Novel Slate

451 Media’s Interactive Publishing debuted their  premiere slate of graphic novels that merge premium content from printed graphic novels with digital video at New York Comic Con. The five all-new graphic novels are going into stores nationwide and also feature top notch live action and animated video content. 451 will be teasing their TouchCode Technology from T+ink that allows readers to unlock exclusive content housed on the Machinima Network using their smart phone or tablet. Sneak peaks of the technology, giveaways of the graphic novels, as well as writer meet-and-greets and autograph signings will be available at 451’s “Imagination to Burn” booth #1536 throughout New York Comic Con.

  • Six” from George Pelecanos (The Wire, The Pacific, Treme and best-selling novelist) is a searing tale of warfare at its worst and fighting soldiers at their best. When the wife of a former Marine buddy finds herself a target of a vicious Mexican cartel, she ends up turning to her husband’s old squad for help. Available November 18.

Six

  • Bad Moon Rising” from Scott Rosenberg (Con Air, High Fidelity, Gone in Sixty Seconds) follows Teddy Waggner, who returns home to discover the small town has become victim to a rash of brutal murders including his father, Sheriff George Waggner. When the moon and gas tanks are full things take an unexpected turn when the townies and werewolves go to war to kick some serious werewolf butt in this wild and wooly smash up of The Wolfman and Sons of Anarchy. Available October 14.

Bad Moon Rising

  • Sunflower” from Mark Mallouk (Black Mass) rewinds ten years back when CJ’s husband and nine year-old daughter were murdered off a desert highway near the California/Arizona border. And, in the decade since, she might as well have been dead.  Until the day a letter arrives. There’s no return address, only one word in the letter. It simply reads: Sunflower. CJ’s daughter is alive. And now so is CJ, who will stop at nothing to get her daughter back. Available October 21.

Sunflower

  • Ex-Mortis” from Peter and Paul Williams (vfx for Avatar, The Avengers, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, King Kong, I Robot, District 9) details the story of the Nazi’s after they unearth the long lost diary of the infamous Dr. Victor Frankenstein. They continue to carry on his work reanimating the corpses of fallen soldiers and building an army of undead infantry to fend off the Allied Liberation of Europe. Under the code name: Project Ex-Mortis the unstoppable legion will try to turn the tide of the war in Hitler’s favor – unless they can be stopped. Available November 4.

cover template

  • Self-Storage” from Clay McLeod Chapman (The Boy, The Avengers, Amazing Spider-Man, Edge of Spider-Verse) tells the story of Chris Smith, who spends his days hopping from one storage facility to the next, bidding on units sight-unseen, only to sell whatever’s inside to antique dealers and pawn shops for as much money as he can squeeze. But Chris has never found anything like what’s waiting for him inside unit #83… …Her name is Jessica. Available October 28.

Self Storage

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Push Comics Forward – A Move Towards Gender Parity

Among the big two publishers there is a fairly common occurrence whereby in order to revamp a team title that there is a shakeup of the characters that belong to that team.  The new characters figure out how to work together under some duress, and then they become an unstoppable team.  This is perhaps the most common with the biggest teams in the medium – the Justice League, The X-Men and the Avengers – as the smaller teams tend to stay more true to their membership.  What is notable about the dynamics of these teams is when the female membership is examined.  Although other teams arguably are better in terms of sales, the Justice League will generally serve as some of kind of touchstone for teams in the medium as it was the first and has the biggest names from a popular culture standpoint.  The League started as a collection of Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman, Green Lantern, Martian Manhunter, the Flash and Aquaman, and when looked upon from that standpoint, the ratio of female to male characters is six to one.

jla01Over the course of the Justice League’s publication history, and more or less for the publication history of every team, there has been a couple of general rules when it comes to its female members.  Female members, if they are written out of the team, and if they are written out of the team, they almost always have to be replaced by another female member.  Equally, when the characters are written out, there is not such a big pool to draw upon when replacing them as if a male character were written out of the story.  In 2006, the Justice League of America was rebooted once again, this time after the events of Infinite Crisis, and in order to tie into the rift between the big three heroes at the time, they decided to sit down and vote on each other’s inclusion into the League as well as all of the other heroes.  While this resulted in a new team, what it also did was to present a somewhat memorable cover (seen at the above right.)  While it is an impressive collection of heroes, the problem of gender parity is obvious here.  There is good representation of most of the popular characters here, but aside from female characters from another time, most of the female superheroes from DC are shown in one panel, whereas there are nunmerous lacking from well-known male characters, and even then the ratio of male to female characters in this picture is 30 to 12, not as bad as 6 to 1, but that still boils down to 5 to 2.

xmenDifferent teams have different compositions of characters.  Justice League International in the new 52 actually had a one to one gender parity (depending on who was counted in its members) and the X-Men have always been better at gender parity, the more so that the X-Men title is comprised of only female members.  At the same time, medium wide, there are generally fewer female characters to draw upon if there was to be a need for them.  In a real world sense, there exists equally the ability of a woman or a man to be a hero, and in terms of who could develop superpowers, seeing as the origins are so different, there is no real reason why men would be favored over women.  The favoritism only exists in character design.  It is not as though female characters should be expected to thrive in comics, at least from a sales standpoint, but creators should endeavor to at least create some interesting background or secondary female characters that would have a chance to grow into something more over time

BOOM! Studios Calls to Push #ComicsForward

2014 BOOM! LogoThis morning BOOM! Studios announced the below editorial from their Founder and CEO of the company Ross Richie. Their hope is to spark a movement to actively shape what the comic book industry should look like in 10 years. The conversation is already happening, and their attempting to unify it under the #ComicsForward banner, to inspire, motivate, and support comics publishers, creators, professionals, press, and fans who want to see an industry that welcomes all types of readers.

So join in the conversation! What would you like to see more of in comics that’s all inclusive? What company is working toward creating a better industry? Which creators are producing content that expands the boundaries of what comics can do? Call them out! Use #ComicsForward in your posts on social media platforms, and we’ll see you there!

Expect lots of discussion here on this site, as well as on our radio show, and elsewhere.

Read Richie’s full statement below.

Push #ComicsForward

It’s Keith Giffen’s fault. I keep telling people that he talked me into it in a dive bar on L.A.’s west side. But the truth is that I started this company out of the spare bedroom in my apartment because I couldn’t believe the guy that created Rocket Raccoon thought I could do it. Maybe we could bring something to comics that hadn’t been there before?

I’ve loved comics since 1976. I never thought I’d publish them. Sure, I’d worked with giants of the field, including Barry Windsor-Smith, Howard Chaykin, Jim Starlin, Walter Simonson, and others too numerous to mention, when I was a young marketing turk at Malibu Comics 20 years ago. But me, publish comic books? You’re crazy.

So it’s 10 years later now. Comics publishers don’t often make it that far, do they? We should do a victory lap right now.

But who wants to look backward when there’s so much more cool stuff around the bend?

Let’s talk about the future.

Have you ever had a friend that shared a lot of your interests, but they didn’t read comics? You gave them Watchmen, you gave them Y: The Last Man, you gave them X-Men. But nothing stuck. They liked the idea of comics, but there wasn’t a comic book that felt like it was made for them…

Let’s go make that comic book for them. Together. As fans, as creators, as retailers, as the press, as publishers. All of us. Let’s talk about how we can all Push #ComicsForward. Because comic books should be for everyone.

We know where we’ve been—our favorite eras, our favorite characters, our favorite runs. We already know all of that. I’ve got a garage full of Silver, Bronze, Copper, and Modern Age comics and I love them.

But the medium of comics has never been more on the forefront of driving pop culture and as fans of this art form, we have a rare opportunity to take that interest to the next level and embrace an entire generation of potential fans who don’t read comics right now.

We can make a new Golden Age.

At BOOM!, we’ve carefully selected new projects in 2015 that we believe will help Push #ComicsForward. These projects will take on risky subject matter, introduce new characters from diverse backgrounds, and debut a swath of new creative voices to the industry.

Just in the first few months of 2015, we’ve launched a gaming-inspired humor comic in Munchkin, two projects that tackle the complex climate in the Middle East with Burning Fields and The Realist, five series with unique female leads (Curb Stomp, HaloGen, Cluster, Help Us! Great Warrior, and Giant Days), a period crime project (Hit: 1957), and an original graphic novel about the cutest crabs to ever start a revolution (The March of the Crabs). And we’ve only just begun. But this movement isn’t just about BOOM!, it’s about all of us. We’ll be devoting a ton of our time and energy in 2015 to work with the press, conventions, and social media channels to keep the conversation going.

If you know me, you know I’m the “Challenge Accepted!” guy. If there’s a problem that hasn’t been solved or a project that seems insurmountable, I’m the first one to jump in. This is a big challenge, but I want you to join me in taking it on.

No one thought comics targeted at All Ages was viable until KaBOOM!. Now it’s the norm. No one thought an all-female cast of characters with an all-female creative team had a shot in the Direct Market—until Lumberjanes. And who would have guessed that an oversized limited series like Memetic, starring a hearing-impaired, gay college student and a blind, African-American general about a meme-induced apocalypse, would garner rave reviews? We did.

If you believe comics are great just the way they are, this isn’t for you. If you think superheroes are the only kinds of stories worth telling in comics, this isn’t for you. But if you want to see everyone reading comics—your aunt, your co-workers, your niece, your boyfriend, that kid down the street—let’s Push #ComicsForward in 2015.

Together.

ROSS RICHIE

Founder & CEO BOOM! Studios