Tag Archives: christopher priest

Review: U.S.Agent #1

U.S.Agent #1

U.S. Agent has always been a bit too much of a B-lister for me to care much about. I do feel he worked best as a haywire version of Captain America, one not afraid to get his hands too bloody to save the day. I’m also a bit of a fan of Christopher Priest from his Quantum & Woody stuff and his more recent Deathstroke work. So, I wanted to see Priest’s take on the character in U.S.Agent #1.

U.S.Agent #1 is comprised of Priest’s writing style, lots of black box panels to move the reader along. Story-wise, U.S. Agent is holed up in a mining town punching out pizza deliverymen until one comes to his house and hands him a slice of his ass and sends him toppling down the stairs. Then the mystery pizza man hangs out with him and they fly off to fight some bad people.

I wanted to like this but I did not like it much at all. U.S. Agent doesn’t work as some jobber just getting beaten down by randos. Maybe I have not paid enough attention to the character history to know what’s up but this guy was Captain America’s replacement and here he just kinda sucks. And it stink because I like Priest’s work but this just felt like the scrap ideas of a bunch of better books that he’s done. I liked Georges Jeanty’s art a bit more than the writing on this book. Nothing special with the panels but his detail is solid. He deserves a better project than this.

Overall, U. S. Agent seemed quite a bit mediocre and I don’t see the appeal of a weak knock-off going on this kind of adventure. It lacked the humor and action that I expect from a Christopher Priest book. Instead of buying this, go get one of the Deathstroke trade paperbacks because that’s a better use of your money.

Story: Christopher Priest Art: Georges Jeanty
Ink: Karl Story Color: Matt Milla Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 4.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon – Kindle – Zeus Comics

Christopher Priest Talks about the Complexity and Relevance of U.S.Agent

U.S.Agent, the Super-Soldier you love to hate is back in an all-new series by writer Christopher Priest and artist George Jeanty! When John Walker is stripped of his official status as U.S.Agent, the former Super Patriot goes independent and gets caught up in a conflict between a small town and the corporate giant trying to destroy it. With a brand-new partner and a dangerous new enemy, Walker’s mission will force the unconventional “superhero” to confront hard-hitting questions about himself and the nation he serves. This journey of self-discovery will dive into the character’s past and set U.S.Agent on course for an exciting new place in the Marvel Universe.

Marvel Host Ryan Penagos recently sat down with Christopher Priest to discuss the acclaimed writer’s views on the former Captain America. Find out what makes U.S.Agent tick and check out never-before-seen art from the series in the below video interview!

John Walker’s high-stakes adventure is now underway! Pick up the debut issue, on sale now, and don’t miss U.S.Agent #2 when it hits stands on December 23rd.

Review: U.S.Agent #1

U.S.Agent #1

There’s a lot I like about U.S.Agent #1. There’s also a lot I struggled with in a mixed debut issue. John Walker is back but he’s no longer an official agent of the government. Instead, he’s a government contractor hired out to do whatever his employer wants. The conflict of this debut revolves around a small town and a conflict with a mega-corporation that has moved in. There’s a lot of potential with just that but with some twists and turns what should be a simple commentary on the state of Middle America turns into a rather muddled and confusing debut.

Written by Christopher Priest, U.S.Agent #1 has a premise that should be easy. It’s themes are an easy layup and its focus should be clear. The concept of a small town having to deal with a mega-corporation destroying their life is something that is well worth discussing. It’s a real-world event that happens over and over and there’s so much material to mine. Instead, Priest mixes in former S.H.I.E.L.D. operation centers, Walker having a partner to tag along, and kidnapping pizza boys!? Yeah, the last part is a bit over the top, even for a character such as Walker.

But, where Priest really drops the ball is Walker himself. The man is beyond bigoted and racist. As depicted, he has absolutely no redeeming qualities. He’s completely unlikeable. I’m given no reason to cheer for him in succeeding or even redeeming himself. He’s a complete asshole and at this point I would love to see him just take a bullet and get it over with.

Georges Jeanty‘s art delivers a little pep to the debut with a style that fits the more comedic tone of the debut. A lot of the art leans on to stereotypes, especially when it comes to the small town. Joined by Karl Story on ink, Matt Milla on color, and Joe Sabino on lettering, the opening few pages features individuals who live in the small town. Each is a bit too similar to each other with the same positioning of their head and even mouth and teeth that look like they’re repeated. I’m not sure if this is done on purpose to make a point or if it’s just the style. But, we’re told they’re small town folk by their hats, clothes, and the slightly dirty look to them all.

But, not all of the art is frustrating. The action has its moments and when the comic wants to play for laughs, Jeanty’s style really fits the moment and the pacing delivered with each panel plays a comedic action comedy beat. If the comic went more in that direction and stuck with it, the art might pull the comic up to a point I’m more excited about it but there’s just too much that doesn’t click in both narrative and visuals.

U.S.Agent #1 feels like it doesn’t know what it wants to be. There’s part of it that’s action/comedy starring a racist. Part of it is a spy/action story… also starring a racist. Then, there are hints there are some psychological things at play and it’s an exploration of John Walker himself. It can be any of those things and if it focused on one of them it might be really good and interesting. As presented, it comes off as a choppy debut that never quite gets its bearing or finds its voice.

Story: Christopher Priest Art: Georges Jeanty
Ink: Karl Story Color: Matt Milla Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.4 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Preview: U.S.Agent #1 (of 5)

U.S.Agent #1 (of 5)

(W) Christopher Priest (A) Georges Jeanty (CA) Marco Checchetto
32 PGS./Rated T+
In Shops: Nov 04, 2020
SRP: $3.99

CHRISTOPHER PRIEST & STEFANO LANDINI BRING BACK THE SUPER-SOLDIER YOU LOVE TO HATE!
“American Zealot” Chapter 1 of 5: John Walker, the former Super Patriot, has been stripped of his official USAgent status and is now operating as an independent government contractor protecting government covert interests. His latest protection detail draws him into a conflict between a small town and the corporate giant trying to destroy it. John acquires a new partner and new enemy along the way while being haunted by ghosts from his past and confronting challenges to his future.

U.S.Agent #1 (of 5)

Get an Early Look at U.S.Agent #1

U.S.Agent #1

Written by Christopher Priest
Art by Georges Jeanty
Colors by Matt Milla
32 PGS./Rated T+
In Shops: Nov 04, 2020
SRP: $3.99

CHRISTOPHER PRIEST & STEFANO LANDINI BRING BACK THE SUPER-SOLDIER YOU LOVE TO HATE!
“American Zealot” Chapter 1 of 5: John Walker, the former Super Patriot, has been stripped of his official USAgent status and is now operating as an independent government contractor protecting government covert interests. His latest protection detail draws him into a conflict between a small town and the corporate giant trying to destroy it. John acquires a new partner and new enemy along the way while being haunted by ghosts from his past and confronting challenges to his future.

U.S.Agent #1

Around the Tubes

Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #1

It’s the first new comic book day of the week! What are you all looking to get? What are you excited for? Sound off in the comments below! While you decide on that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Salon – “We in America have actual fascists marching in the streets”: Ed Brubaker on releasing art right now – Well worth the read.

Sequart Organization – Panther’s Range: The History of the Black Panther Prior to Christopher Priest – For those that want to learn about the character.

Kotaku – New Zealand’s Prime Minister Made A Very Wholesome Appearance On Twitch – Expect a lot more campaigning on Twitch in the coming years.

Reviews

Flickering Myth – Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #1
CBR – Getting It Together #1
The Beat – Magician A

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal Guidebook #1

DARK NIGHTS: DEATH METAL GUIDEBOOK #1

I remember “guidebooks” from back in the day. They’d be a lot of text that were more like roleplaying game supplements than comic books. And that’s what I expected with Dark Nights: Death Metal Guidebook #1. I was also really wrong about that as well. The Dark Nights: Death Metal tie-in is full of standalone stories and tales that shed more light on what has happened. It’s also a perfect guide for those that skipped “Year of the Villain” and want to catch up.

Dark Nights: Death Metal Guidebook #1 featured five stories from various creative teams and in between it has one-page guides/sketches that I was expected more of. As with all anthologies, the quality varies in story and art but this is the rare case where everything is at least good if not great. The story subjects, tones, and focus are all different delivering insight into the event.

The main chunk of the comic is made up of the “Fall of Earth”. The story goes into detail exactly what happened. While it skips some of the lead up it’s the perfect read for those who want to know what they missed. In goes into so much detail it spoils the first three issues of Dark Nights: Death Metal as well. It’s the Cliff’s Notes version of the event and when I got to the end, I felt like I had a good grasp as to what was going on and the why. None of it was Earth-shattering (pun intended) but I feel like I have a bit more of a grasp as to what’s going on now.

The other four stories focus on various heroes and villains and where they stand.

Harley Quinn gets a spotlight as she explores the irradiated wastelands and it answers some questions as to what has happened to some villains while raising questions as well. Aquaman is the most intriguing of the stories as it shows a former King subjugated and folded to protect his people. We learn more about Wonder Woman and her jail of villains. The story is the highlight of the comic delivering an emotional punch. Wrapping it up is a story featuring Batman, Jonah Hex, and the Joker Dragon. While the overall story is the weakest of the bunch it also has some key details that will impact the main story. There’s a reason Hex was chosen by Batman and something he must do if things go sideways.

The art is pretty solid all around. The styles vary a bit but none of it varies too much from each other. It’s unique but cohesive at the same time. All of it is good across the board and each has its moments that’ll leave you lingering. With a limited amount of pages to work with, the art is key to tell the story and bring emotion.

Dark Nights: Death Metal Guidebook #1 is a one-shot tie-in that really works. While it feels like it should have come out earlier in the event, it does a great job of acting as a starting point for those who missed the first three issues. It answers a lot of questions and also drops some key hints for the main story as well. It’s a spin-off that feels as vital as any main event issue.

Story: Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV, Joshua Williamson, Chip Zdarsky, Becky Cloonan, Vita Ayala, Christopher Priest
Art: Doug Mahnke, Khary Randolph, Becky Cloonan, Dan Panosian, Eduardo Risso
Ink: Jamie Mendoza
Color: David Baron, Emilio Lopez, Tamra Bonvillain, Luis Guerrero, Eduardo Risso
Lettering: Tom Napolitano, Dave Sharpe, Steve Wands, Ferran Delgado, Willie Schubert
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazon Kindle Zeus Comics

Christopher Priest and Stefano Landini Explore the Conflict Between a Town and Corporation in U.S.Agent

In a comic that immediately went in to our “excited to read” pile, Marvel has revealed that writer Christopher Priest and artist Stefano Landini area teaming up for U.S.Agent. The first issue drops in November. Titled “American Zealot” the story is described by Priest as a morality play that takes place in five chapters.

John Walker has been stripped of his official USAgent status and is now an independent government contractor protecting government covert interests. He’s drawn into a conflict between a small town and corporate giant attempting to destroy it. Along the way, he gets a new partner and new enemy as well as being haunted by the ghosts from his past while facing his future.

Around the Tubes

I Had That Same Dream Again

It’s new comic book day for DC Comics! What are you all excited for? What do you plan on reading? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Comicbook – The King’s Man Director Teases a Longer, Dirtier Cut of the Film – Release the dirty cut!

ICv2 – Superhero Comics May Have Finally Met Their Kryptonite – A major shift in comics continues.

Sequart Organization – Exploring White Privilege in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther: Part 2, Hunter, the White Wolf – An interesting read.

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: Stumble through life with Dami Lee in AS PER USUAL – Free comics!

Review

The Beat – I Had That Same Dream Again

Preview: Our Fighting Forces #1

Our Fighting Forces #1

House Call” by Priest, Christopher Mooneyham, Ivan Plascencia, and Willie Schubert (cover by Mikel Janín)

A cable news reporter embedded with a mysterious U.S. Army tactical unit tries to figure out which one of the team’s members is the immortal covert operative code-named the Unknown Soldier—and discovers much more than she bargained for!

Our Fighting Forces #1
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