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The Inkwell Awards has announced the winners of its 14th annual awards for excellence

Inkwell Awards

The Inkwell Awards has announced the winners of its 14th annual awards for excellence in the comic-book inking art form. Results are normally first made public at its live awards ceremony during its host show, The Great Philadelphia Comic Con, but at present, due to uncertainties with the Covid-19 pandemic, the show status is unknown and the ceremony is canceled.

Nominees were chosen by a separate and independent nomination committee on their own as well as from artist submissions. Voting by professionals and fans took place for one week in March on the official ballot at the non-profit advocacy’s website. After 1587 ballots were tallied, one winner was chosen in each of five categories based on printed American interior comic-book work cover-dated 2020.

As begun last year, the Inkwells’ internal committee chose to not limit lifetime achievement awards within a given year. They selected four inductees for the annual Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame and three recipients for the Stacey Aragon Special Recognition Award (SASRA). There were no internal Silver Inkwell Awards recipients this year but there were two internal Above & Beyond Awards given to Bob Bretall and Johnny B. Gerardy for 10 years of Nomination Committee service.

Ballot nominees are listed below with their credits and the percentage of votes received by the winners, along with the other nominees in alphabetical order.

  • FAVORITE INKER (Favorite ink artist over the pencil work of another artist; cannot also be nominated for the “Props” award): Ruy Jose (41%) (Immortal Hulk [Marvel]).
    Other nominees: Jonathan Glapion, Klaus Janson, Joe Prado.
  • MOST-ADAPTABLE (Artist showing exceptional ink style versatility over other pencillers): Norm Rapmund (42%) (Batman Beyond, Detective Comics, The Flash, Flash Forward, Dark Nights Death Metal: The Multiverse Who Laughs (one-shot), Wonder Woman [DC]).
    Other nominees: Marc Deering, Daniel Henriques, Matt Santorelli, LeBeau Underwood.
  • PROPS (Inker deserving of more attention): Eber Ferreira (41%) (Speed Metal (one-shot), Freedom Fighters, Justice League [DC]).
    Other nominees: Adriano Di Benedetto, Daniel Henriques, Le Beau Underwood.
  • S.P.A.M.I. (Small Press And Mainstream Independent): Adelso Corona (69%) Snake Eyes [IDW]; Bloodshot [Valiant]).Other nominees: Le Beau Underwood.
  • ALL-IN-ONE (Favorite artist known for inking his/her own pencils): Chris Samnee (40%) (FirePower [Image]).
    Other nominees: Marco Santucci, Liam Sharp.

In alphabetical order, the lifetime achievement awards were as follows:

THE STACEY ARAGON SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD (SASRA): Alfredo Alcala, Frank Frazetta, and Wendy Pini.

THE JOE SINNOTT HALL OF FAME: Sal Buscema, Mike Esposito, Pablo Marcos, and Mike Royer.

Mark Sinnott, Joe’s son/agent, said, “It is an honor for me to keep with the tradition that my dad, Joltin’ Joe Sinnott started over 10 years ago. On behalf of the Inkwell Awards, I would like to welcome its four newest members to its hallowed halls: Sal Buscema, Mike Esposito, Pablo Marcos and Mike Royer. It is great to have you all as members of the Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame class of 2021. Welcome to the Inkwell family! You have all brought a great deal of talent and class to the comic book world, and we thank you for that. Keep slingin’ ink, and never let your inkwell run dry!”

Full acceptance statements from Sinnott and the winners will be found in the “Award Recipients” section of the Inkwell Awards’ website in the near future.

Robert Kirkman, Chris Samnee, and Matthew Wilson Celebrate One Year of Fire Power

Superstars Robert Kirkman, Chris Samnee, and Matthew Wilson celebrate Fire Power’s historic first anniversary with a line-up of stunning covers and a sneak peek at interior art from issue #12. This momentous issue will showcase some of the biggest names in comics lending their talents to some of Image and Skybound’s hottest covers of the year.

Everything has been leading to this moment. The Scorched Earth Clan and The Order of the Flaming Fist face off one final time! Owen Johnson has fully reentered the world he left behind and from this point on—everything changes! This extra-length issue is NOT TO BE MISSED!

Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 will be available at comic book shops and digital platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, comiXology, and Google Play on Wednesday, June 2:

  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover A by Samnee & Matthew Wilson (Diamond Code APR210165) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover B by Frank Quitely (Diamond Code APR210166) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover C by Mindy Lee (Diamond Code APR210167) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover D by Tula Lotay (Diamond Code APR210168)  
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover E by Todd McFarlane & Matthew Wilson (Diamond Code APR210169) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover F by Simone Di Meo (Diamond Code APR210170) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover G by Tonci Zonjic (Diamond Code APR210171) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover H by Rob Liefeld & Marcelo Maiolo (Diamond Code APR210172) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover I by Annie Wu (Diamond Code APR210173) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover J by Erik Larsen & Matthew Wilson (Diamond Code APR210174) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover K by Khary Randolph (Diamond Code APR210175) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover L by Frank Miller & Alex Sinclair (Diamond Code APR210176) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover M Pride variant by Kira Okamoto (Diamond Code MAR219145) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover N 1:25 Copy B&W incentive variant by Frank Miller (Diamond Code MAR219146) 
  • Fire Power by Kirkman & Samnee #12 Cover O 1:25 Copy B&W incentive variant by Todd McFarlane (Diamond Code MAR219147)  

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 Heads Back to Print

The Oni-Lion Forge Publishing Group is thrilled to announce that the first issue printing of the all-ages single-issue series Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters, in which two sisters struggle on a journey against incredible “unpossible” monsters of all shapes and sizes from the creative team of Chris Samnee, Laura Samnee, Matthew Wilson, and Crank!, has sold out at the distribution level and is heading for an immediate reprint. The second printing features the already-iconic first issue cover by Chris Samnee as reimagined by colorist Matthew Wilson.

Rainbow has been searching for her sister, Jonna, for a year. The last time she saw Jonna was also the first time she saw one of the strange monsters that now roam the planet. They’re big, ugly, and dangerous creatures that have driven humanity to the brink of extinction. Though there isn’t much hope for survival out in the wild, Rainbow knows that her sister is out there somewhere—and she’ll do anything to find her.

Print copies of Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 continue to be available at your local comic book store. Digital copies are available for purchase from comiXology and other digital retailers.

The final order cutoff for the Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters issue #1 reprint is March 22, 2021, it will be available in stores and online on April 14, 2021. The Diamond Previews code for Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 second printing is FEB218316. Final order cutoff for Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #2 has been updated to March 29, 2021, in light of the second printing of issue #1, with a new on-sale date of April 21, 2021.

You can read our review of Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 2nd printing

Review: Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1

The talented artist/colorist duo of Chris Samnee and Matthew Wilson dive headfirst into the world of all-ages fantasy comics in Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 with Samnee handing story duties as well with co-writer Laura Samnee. The premise of the story is simple, yet heart-rending. Jonna is an energetic young girl, who enjoys running, climbing trees, and being generally adventurous. However, she runs into a big monster one day and goes missing. The hook for the series is that her older sister, Rainbow, must find her in a landscape that’s gone from pastoral to dystopian. With a knapsack on her back and a feather in her beanie, Rainbow also seems to have that adventurous spirit, but it’s for a purpose: finding her lost sister and family.

The first and second half of Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters have completely different tones, and the Samnees and Wilson do an excellent job conveying that through script, art, and color palette. All the dialogue in the first half of the comic comes from an exasperated Rainbow, except for one word from Jonna, “Unpossible”. And, honestly, that’s all that needs to be said about her character and the setup of the comic. Jonna is a doer, not a talker, and Samnee and Wilson fill full pages of her leaping from branch to branch culminating in a triumphant splash page at her leaping at the titular monster. These pages are a showcase for Samnee’s skill at showing action and tension as Jonna’s position changes from panel to panel, and Samnee switches from horizontal to vertical layouts depending on the degree of difficulty of her jumps and flips. The tension comes when a branch almost break, and, of course, when she encounters a monster so Wilson uses red to symbolize fear and danger almost in a similar manner to how he colored Chris Samnee’s work on Black Widow when its protagonist got in a rough spot.

However, the second half of Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters swaps out Matthew Wilson’s bright colors for something a little more drab. (The one exception is Rainbow’s shock of blue hair.) Facial expressions and dialogue play a larger role as the Samnees’ story transitions from a little girl running free in the wood to her sister trying to find her. Chris Samnee digs into the hopelessness of this new monster-infested status quo in little ways like Rainbow’s utter surprise when she has a nice conversation with another kid about the feather (From the last bird ever!) in her cap or from a close-up of her kicking rock to show the sheer emptiness of her surrounding. However, he and Laura Samnee find little glimmers of light like through Rainbow’s interactions with the totally adorable Gramma Pat, who wants nothing more than for Rainbow to settle down and stay in the camp for a while. However, she also understands that the potential of finding Jonna or the rest of her family is what keeps her motivated and basically gives her a reason to get up in the morning.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 reminds me a lot of Gareth Edwards’ excellent kaiju film Monsters although the Samnees’ comic has a much more whimsical vibe than the film. The main similarity is in the focus on how these giant monsters have affected human civilization instead of epic battles. (For now.) Rainbow blacks out when she sees Jonna jumping at the monster, and then there’s a page of black with a couple stars that leads into the one year time skip. It shows that these monsters have changed humanity’s way of life and aren’t just gentle giants that young girls can hop around in the woods. These two pages between the first and second part of the comics are a metaphor for having to grow up too fast and sacrifice your childhood and sense of wonder to survive, which is what Rainbow has had to do even though she does keep around relics of the “before time” like her beanie, the aforementioned feather, and her blue hair. These little costume and design choices from Chris Samnee definitely add a hopeful tone to the dark setting of the second half of the comic and hint at a rich world that we’ve only scratched the surface of.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 shows off Chris Samnee and Matthew Wilson’s skill at visually depicting both dynamic movement and quiet character moments as they and Laura Samnee set up a world full of danger and things that go bump during the night and day plus a plucky protagonist, who is willing to face them because she loves and misses her family. I can’t wait to see how Rainbow grows as a character and the dangers (Aka monsters) she faces and hopefully overcomes on her adventure with a purpose.

Story: Laura Samnee and Chris Samnee Art: Chris Samnee
Colors: Matthew Wilson Letters: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.5 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Early Review: Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1

The talented artist/colorist duo of Chris Samnee and Matthew Wilson dive headfirst into the world of all-ages fantasy comics in Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 with Samnee handing story duties as well with co-writer Laura Samnee. The premise of the story is simple, yet heart-rending. Jonna is an energetic young girl, who enjoys running, climbing trees, and being generally adventurous. However, she runs into a big monster one day and goes missing. The hook for the series is that her older sister, Rainbow, must find her in a landscape that’s gone from pastoral to dystopian. With a knapsack on her back and a feather in her beanie, Rainbow also seems to have that adventurous spirit, but it’s for a purpose: finding her lost sister and family.

The first and second half of Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters have completely different tones, and the Samnees and Wilson do an excellent job conveying that through script, art, and color palette. All the dialogue in the first half of the comic comes from an exasperated Rainbow, except for one word from Jonna, “Unpossible”. And, honestly, that’s all that needs to be said about her character and the setup of the comic. Jonna is a doer, not a talker, and Samnee and Wilson fill full pages of her leaping from branch to branch culminating in a triumphant splash page at her leaping at the titular monster. These pages are a showcase for Samnee’s skill at showing action and tension as Jonna’s position changes from panel to panel, and Samnee switches from horizontal to vertical layouts depending on the degree of difficulty of her jumps and flips. The tension comes when a branch almost break, and, of course, when she encounters a monster so Wilson uses red to symbolize fear and danger almost in a similar manner to how he colored Chris Samnee’s work on Black Widow when its protagonist got in a rough spot.

However, the second half of Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters swaps out Matthew Wilson’s bright colors for something a little more drab. (The one exception is Rainbow’s shock of blue hair.) Facial expressions and dialogue play a larger role as the Samnees’ story transitions from a little girl running free in the wood to her sister trying to find her. Chris Samnee digs into the hopelessness of this new monster-infested status quo in little ways like Rainbow’s utter surprise when she has a nice conversation with another kid about the feather (From the last bird ever!) in her cap or from a close-up of her kicking rock to show the sheer emptiness of her surrounding. However, he and Laura Samnee find little glimmers of light like through Rainbow’s interactions with the totally adorable Gramma Pat, who wants nothing more than for Rainbow to settle down and stay in the camp for a while. However, she also understands that the potential of finding Jonna or the rest of her family is what keeps her motivated and basically gives her a reason to get up in the morning.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 reminds me a lot of Gareth Edwards’ excellent kaiju film Monsters although the Samnees’ comic has a much more whimsical vibe than the film. The main similarity is in the focus on how these giant monsters have affected human civilization instead of epic battles. (For now.) Rainbow blacks out when she sees Jonna jumping at the monster, and then there’s a page of black with a couple stars that leads into the one year time skip. It shows that these monsters have changed humanity’s way of life and aren’t just gentle giants that young girls can hop around in the woods. These two pages between the first and second part of the comics are a metaphor for having to grow up too fast and sacrifice your childhood and sense of wonder to survive, which is what Rainbow has had to do even though she does keep around relics of the “before time” like her beanie, the aforementioned feather, and her blue hair. These little costume and design choices from Chris Samnee definitely add a hopeful tone to the dark setting of the second half of the comic and hint at a rich world that we’ve only scratched the surface of.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #1 shows off Chris Samnee and Matthew Wilson’s skill at visually depicting both dynamic movement and quiet character moments as they and Laura Samnee set up a world full of danger and things that go bump during the night and day plus a plucky protagonist, who is willing to face them because she loves and misses her family. I can’t wait to see how Rainbow grows as a character and the dangers (Aka monsters) she faces and hopefully overcomes on her adventure with a purpose.

Story: Laura Samnee and Chris Samnee Art: Chris Samnee
Colors: Matthew Wilson Letters: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.5 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Pre-order: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Marvel Celebrates 80 Years of Captain America with a Giant-Sized Tribute

In March 1941, comic book legends Jack Kirby and Joe Simon introduced the world to Steve Rogers in the historic Captain America Comics #1, and a pop culture icon was born. Marvel will honor their tremendous contribution to the comic book industry with Captain America Tribute #1, a giant-sized special celebrating the character’s 80th anniversary.

Captain America Tribute #1 will feature a cadre of Marvel’s best artists redrawing and modernizing Captain America’s first appearance, Captain America Comics #1, as well as his genre-defining reintroduction to the Marvel Universe, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s Avengers #4. See the Star-Spangled Avenger’s extraordinary origin, his first battle against the Red Skull, and his Silver Age debut where he emerges from suspended animation to live on as a Star-Spangled Avenger like never before as your favorite artists reimagine these classic tales for a new age. These definitive comic book stories will be presented in an all-new way in a star-studded special that will delight long-time True Believers and the current generation of Marvel fans!

This unparalleled undertaking will include artwork by John Cassaday, Marguerite Sauvage, David Lapham, Declan Shalvey, Pere Pérez, Salvador Larroca, Leinil Francis Yu, Valerio Schiti, Carlos Pacheco, Inhyuk Lee, Kei Zama, Sara Pichelli, Jesús Saiz, Kim Jacinto, Adam Kubert, Federico Vicentini, Mahmud Asrar, Jim Cheung, Terry Dodson, Joe Bennett, Alex Ross, Steve Epting, Adam Hughes, Stephanie Hans, Javier Garrón, Alitha E. Martinez, Elena Casagrande, Paco Medina, Daniel Acuña, Chris Samnee, Butch Guice, Rachael Stott, Pepe Larraz, Greg Smallwood, Greg Land, Ray-Anthony Height, Mark Bagley, and Marvel’s Stormbreakers including Peach Momoko, Juann Cabal, Carmen Carnero, R.B. Silva, Joshua Cassara, Natacha Bustos, Iban Coello, and Patrick Gleason! And with a cover by Steve McNiven.

For 80 years, Captain America’s adventures have entertained fans of all ages around the world. Don’t miss today’s top talent pay homage to Captain America’s most legendary stories when Captain America Tribute #1 hits stands this coming March!

Captain America Tribute #1

The MCU’s Black Widow Inspires Variant Covers Showcasing Marvel Comics’ Black Widow

Marvel has revealed that select Black Widow comics will receive new Marvel Cinematic Universe variant covers featuring artwork inspired by Marvel Studios’ Black Widow! To celebrate the superspy Avenger’s upcoming solo adventure, fans can find these variants by exploring her action-packed world of espionage in Black Widow #3, the next issue in her current ongoing series by Kelly Thompson and Elena Casagrande, as well as one-shots like Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 by Ralph Macchio and Simone Buonfantino and Widowmakers: Red Guardian and Yelena Belova #1 by Devin Grayson and Michele Bandini.

Drawn by some of the industry’s hottest talents, these eye-catching covers showcase characters and imagery from the highly-anticipated film. One of the most popular Black Widow artists in recent years, Eisner award-winning artist Chris Samnee returns to the character with a movie poster-style cover depicting the film’s main cast for Widowmakers: Red Guardian and Yelena Belova #1. On superstar artist Stefano Caselli’s Black Widow: Widow’s Sting #1 cover, Natasha Romanoff races to her next mission. And fans will be delighted at Jen Bartel’s vibrant depiction of Scarlett Johansson’s iconic portrayal of the character in her cover for Black Widow #3!

BLACK WIDOW: WIDOW’S STING #1 (FEB200830)

Written by RALPH MACCHIO
Art by SIMONE BUONFANTINO
MCU Variant Cover by STEFANO CASELLI (AUG200683)

BLACK WIDOW: WIDOW’S STING #1 (FEB200830)

BLACK WIDOW #3 (APR200951)

Written by KELLY THOMPSON
Art by ELENA CASAGRANDE
MCU Variant Cover by JEN BARTEL

BLACK WIDOW #3 (APR200951)

WIDOWMAKERS: RED GUARDIAN AND YELENA BELOVA #1 (FEB200833)

Written by DEVIN GRAYSON
Art by MICHELE BANDINI
MCU VARIANT COVER by CHRIS SAMNEE (SEP200639)

WIDOWMAKERS: RED GUARDIAN AND YELENA BELOVA #1

Preview: Giant-Size X-Men: Tribute to Wein & Cockrum

Giant-Size X-Men: Tribute to Wein & Cockrum

(W) Len Wein (A) Alex Ross, Kevin Nowlan, Chris Samnee, Marcus To, Siya Oum, Stephen Segovia, Marguerite Sauvage, Carmen Nunez Carnero, Bernard Chang, Aaron Kuder, Takeshi Miyagawa, Juan Cabal, Gurihiru, Mark Brooks, Kris Anka, Phil Noto, Valerio Schiti, Leinil Francis Yu, Matteo Lolli, Emanuela Lupacchino, Carlos E. Gomez, R. B. Silva, Ramon Rosanas, Joshua Cassara, David Baldeon, Marcelo Ferreira, Javi Garron, Rod Reis, Javier Rodriguez, Marco Checchetto, Jen Bartel, Michael Del Mundo, Rahzzah, Pepe Larraz, Mike Hawthorne (CA) Adi Granov
Rated T+
In Shops: Sep 30, 2020
SRP: $5.99

CELEBRATING THE CLASSIC’S 45TH ANNIVERSARY!
Forty-five years ago, a comic book came out that would change the face of Marvel Comics forever. Writer Len Wein and artist Dave Cockrum revamped the X-Men completely, replacing the bulk of the teen heroes with a completely new international cast! The legendary one-shot took comic fans by storm and set the series off in a new direction, setting the stage for the legendary X-scribe Chris Claremont to make them the most popular heroes in the Marvel Universe! Now, 37 of Marvel’s top artists come together to re-create this epic story, each re-drawing one pulse-pounding page in tribute to this Marvel masterpiece!

Giant-Size X-Men: Tribute to Wein & Cockrum

Fire Power Gets a Double Sellout and New Printings

The New York Times bestselling, Eisner Award winning pop culture phenomenon Robert Kirkman has caught lightning in a bottle once more on his co-creation with Eisner winning artist Chris Samnee, Eisner Award-winning colorist Matt Wilson, and letterer Rus Wooton in the new series—Fire Power. Issues #1 and #3 are being rushed back to print in order to keep up with breakout customer demand.

Despite a total of 200K copies of Fire Power #1 already pumped into circulation, the launch issue has sold out at the distributor level, alongside Fire Power #3, with backorders piling up.

In the new series Fire Power, Owen Johnson’s journey to China to learn about his birth parents eventually leads him to a mysterious Shaolin Temple. The students there study The Fire Power—the lost art of throwing fireballs. A power they claim will be needed soon to save the world. Will Owen Johnson be the first person in a thousand years to wield the Fire Power?

Fire Power #1, second printing (Diamond Code AUG208118) and Fire Power #3, second printing (Diamond Code AUG208119) will both be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 14.

Comics Deserve Better: Episode 4: Descender #1-7 by Jeff Lemire, Dustin Nguyen, and Steve Wands

In this episode of Comics Deserve Better, Brian, Darci, and Logan gush over the first arc of Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen‘s 2015 space opera comic, Descender. Stay tuned for chatter about small robots, big robots, and great watercolor art. Other comics mentioned on the show, include Robert Kirkman and Chris Samnee‘s blockbuster Fire Power, self-published darlings Post and Stella vs. the Tinder Box, Tom Taylor and Daniele Di Nicuolo‘s Seven Secrets, Evan Dahm‘s Harrowing of Hell, and more. (Episode art by Dustin Nguyen)

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