Tag Archives: chip zdarsky

Preview: Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1

Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1

(W) Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, Paul Dini, Chip Zdarsky, Daniel Kibblesmith (A) Chad Hardin, Joe Quinones, David Lafuente (A/CA) Amanda Conner
In Shops: Sep 13, 2017
SRP: $4.99

In a story written by Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti, with art by Conner, learn what really happened when Harley, Catwoman, and Poison Ivy hit Vegas!
Then, a tale written by Paul Dini with art by Chad Hardin takes us back to Harley’s days with the Joker to see the hell he unleashes when he makes the mistake of scheduling the biggest heist of their career on Harley’s birthday!

Plus, writer Chip Zdarsky and artist Joe Quinones pit Harley and the Joker against Batman and Robin — but while you might think the Joker knows how to play with Batman’s mind, it’s nothing compared to Harley’s ability to crack Robin’s psyche!
And that’s not all! Writer Dale Kibblesmith with art by David LaFuente put Coney Island right in the path of a hurricane — and put Harley on a collision course with Swamp Thing, of all people…monsters…things…?

This issue also includes Harley pin-up pages with art by Babs Tarr, Bengal, Dustin Nguyen and more!

DC Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Harley Quinn!

Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1 by Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, Paul Dini, Chip Zdarsky, Chad Hardin, and Joe Quinones.

Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1 is in comic book stores today.

Get your copy now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFW

 

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Review: Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1

Jimmy Palmiotti and Amanda Conner are back on the scene to kick off he first take in this super fun, super sized, four story issue celebrating Harley, Harley Quinn 25th Anniversary Special #1. We are treated to a bevy of talented writers and artist and, despite the diverse writing and art styles, cover to cover Harley Quinn 25th is an interesting and fun exploration into Harley’s most interesting relationships. In “Diva Las Vegas” we get a glimpse into a girls road trip featuring Harley, Catwoman and Poison Ivy where they stop a robbery and destroy some stuff with a huge party. We then get a history of Harley’s birthdays and some slight Joker interaction where we get a sweet wink into her relationship with Ivy. The third story is another fun adventure with Ivy and the issue wraps up with a Harley vs Robin fight where Robin gets to be a hero and Harley does something unexpected.

There are some amazing artists lending a hand in this issue using various but, somehow cohesive styles. Paul Mounts and Dave Sharpe make the colors and art pop in “Diva Las Vegas,” Chad Hardin and Alex Sinclair give some pop style art to the Paul Dini written “Birthday Blues,” David Lafuente and John Rauch provide the muted tones and throwback art for the Daniel Kibblesmith penned “Somewhere That’s Green” story and Chip “Zdark Knight” Zdarsky‘s “Bird Psychology” gets an artist assist from Joe Quinones who served us some simple but, aesthetically pleasing characters and detailed backdrops.

Overall, this issue is a fun read for Harley fans. There’s some nice girl powered storylines, a glimpse into Harley and Joker, a view into her turning point where we remember the complex nature of our favorite antihero. It’s a hella fun ride and I think that everyone should get in on the action for some great stories that are short, sweet, and packed full of Harley Quinn goodness.

Story: Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, Chip Zdarsky, Paul Dini, Daniel Kibblesmih Art: Joe Quinones, Paul Mounts, Dave Sharpe, David Lafuente , John Rauch, Chad Hardin, Alex Sinclair
Story: 8.9 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

 

Marvel Legacy Unveils Multiple New Series

This fall, a new day will shine on the Marvel Universe with your favorite heroes, your favorite creators…where every story is an event!

Marvel has announced the following creative teams and Legacy titles:

PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN #297
Written by CHIP ZDARSKY
Art by ADAM KUBERT

 

MASTER OF KUNG-FU #126
Written by CM PUNK
Art by DALIBOR TALAJIC

 

DAREDEVIL #595
Written by CHARLES SOULE
Art by STEFANO LANDINI

 

MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #25
Written by BRANDON MONTCLARE
Art by NATACHA BUSTOS

 

For an in-depth look at our return to original numbering, fans can consult Marvel’s renumbering chart – a handy and easy way to jump on board with our Legacy content! Featuring new adventures and dozens of exciting returns, look for more interviews and updates with artists, writers, and editors of these series.

Marvel Announces “How to Draw Variants” by Chip Zdarsky

Have you ever wanted the great power and responsibility of drawing Spider-Man? Do you look at the pages of Black Panther and wish you could draw a Wakandan king? How often have you been tempted to break the fourth wall and draw Gwenpool?

Marvel is giving fans a chance to learn how to draw like a super hero with How to Draw Variant Covers by blockbuster writer Chip Zdarsky. First appearing on the back of a blank variant cover on Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #1, How to Draw Variants will debut on the covers of select Marvel comics this fall. Each custom cover features a step-by-step process for drawing one of Marvel’s iconic characters – along with some helpful “Zdarsky Advice” for good measure.

 

Don’t miss your chance to learn how to draw from Marvel’s best. Be sure to visit your local comic shop and pick up your How to Draw Variants for these titles this fall!

  1. ALL-NEW GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #11
  2. ALL NEW WOLVERINE #25
  3. BLACK PANTHER #166
  4. CABLE #150
  5. CAPTAIN MARVEL #125
  6. CHAMPIONS #13
  7. DAREDEVIL #27
  8. DEFENDERS #6
  9. FALCON #1
  10. GWENPOOL, THE UNBELIEVABLE #21
  11. HAWKEYE #11
  12. INCIVIBLE IRON MAN #593
  13. MIGHTY THOR #700
  14. PUNISHER: THE PLATOON #1
  15. ROYALS #9
  16. SPIDER-GWEN #25
  17. SPIRITS OF VENGEANCE #1
  18. THE UNBEATABLE SQUIRREL GIRL #25
  19. VENOM #155
  20. X-MEN: GOLD #13

Preview: Road to Riverdale Vol. 3

ROAD TO RIVERDALE VOL 3 (TR)

Script: Mark Waid, Chip Zdarsky, Adam Hughes, Marguerite Bennett & Cameron Deordio, Tom DeFalco
Art: Fiona Staples, Erica Henderson, Adam Hughes, Audrey Mok, Sandy Jarrell, Andre Szymanowicz, Jose Villarrubia, Kelly Fitzpatrick, Jack Morelli
Cover: Francesco Francavilla
978-1-68255-964-2
$14.99/$16.99CAN
6 5/8 x 10 3/16”
TR
136 pp, Full Color
Direct Market On-Sale Date: 7/19

READ THE STORIES THAT INSPIRED THE NEW CW TV SERIES! Road to Riverdale Vol. 3 features stories from Archie, Jughead, Betty and Veronica, Josie and the Pussycats, and Reggie & Me.

HeroesCon Proves Good Comic Shows Don’t Have To Be Hard to Find

“Hello neighbors,” I say to the circle I’m standing in the middle of.

“Hello neighbor,” the circle intones back happily, including Bitch Planet co-creator Kelly Sue Deconnick, who is running this panel. This is just one of the games she’s taught us. The same games she teaches her Girl Scout troop to teach them how to set boundaries and learn about their community.

“I love all of my neighbors, but especially the ones who watch professional wrestling,” I say to the circle. I cover it professionally. I wanted to see if someone was at least interested.

Silence. No one gets up.

“Just me? Okay.”

I change my prompt to those who like combat boots and we scramble to find chairs, leaving someone else in the center to greet their neighbors. I’m not salty though. It’s not long before I’m talking to someone else about pro-wrestling at the end of the panel. It’s HeroesCon after all. Most of us are just neighbors who haven’t met yet.

HeroesCon is an annual comic book convention in Charlotte. Every Father’s Day weekend, comics creators and fans from all around the country descend upon the Queen City to mingle and to sell books and art. It was started by Shelton Drum, the owner of the local shop Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find, but the con has extended beyond the reach of the shop. Especially 35 years on.

I went to my first one in 2014 on a whirlwind day trip from Atlanta to Charlotte, determined to meet my newfound comics heroes Deconnick, Matt Fraction, and Chip Zdarsky. Three years later, I’m still making friends and greeting friends every time I walk the floor, and that’s honestly part of the charm of HeroesCon.

The con is unique in this day of entertainment industry powered comic cons, where comics often take a back seat to television and movies. HeroesCon is comics and comic creator focused, still even after 35 years. The local CW affiliate sets up a booth where they give prizes away relating to the DC Comics TV shows on the network, but that’s about as far as the TV involvement goes. Walk a little further, and you’re bound to find some of your favorite creators sitting at tables, selling their books and art. Or maybe even your future favorite creator. That same con three years prior? That was the first con I met Babs Tarr, excited to see the Bosozoku Sailor Scouts art in person. This year, she was selling exclusive trades of Motor Crush that could only be found at the convention, with Domino and Lola blasting past Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find. It’s hard not to feel proud.

The games panel is different from the other panels I was able to make it to during the weekend. The other two were more traditional. Well, as traditional as you can get with Zdarsky talking about going undercover at a skeezy nudist resort as the long way of saying his parents are into Sex Criminals during his spotlight panel and Fraction reading quotes from his supervillain daughter Tallulah Louise during the Milkfed Criminal Masterminds panel (which I livetweeted here).

It feels like only a panel that could work at HeroesCon though. Laid back and concentrated on being open. There is no pressure to participate. It’s not crunched and stressful like Dragon Con and it’s not about promoting the next big property. We’re here to learn about our community. To share in a mutual love.

“I feel welcome in my fandom,” Deconnick asks the room in a game of Across the Room, where we cross to the other side of the room to join a line.

I stay firmly planted for the time. I feel welcome at HeroesCon. It’s not a con of exclusion. They’re here for all fans of comics. But comics fandom? I’m a queer woman. I barely feel welcome. For pro-wrestling? I constantly feel like I’m loitering around a door, screaming at the residents inside, even if I do write about it professionally.

“I want to make people feel welcome in my fandom.”

There, I take the opportunity to aggressively stomp across the room.

“My mom wanted me to give you a hug from her,” I tell Deconnick after the panel. She met my mom at a Bitch Planet signing in Toronto a couple of years ago and asks me about her every time we see each other at a convention. We exchange hugs and she ‘awws’ about my mom.

It’s one of those things I wish I could tell me of three years ago about, nervous about meeting her idols. It’s also one of those things I feel grateful to HeroesCon for. Helping break down barriers and anxieties to help me figure out my career.

Every year I’ve gone, it’s expanded a little more, but it still feels like a family reunion. It’s the con I look forward to the most every year just because I get to see my comics friends without the added extra stress of packing five days worth of cosplay or having to time running across five hotels to make it to a panel in a basement. It drains my wallet with good art and good food, but it’s welcome. Where else can Kris Anka make jokes about having to fix Joe Quinones’ art when I come to pick up a commission of Captain Marvel? Or the press liaison that I have not previously met recognizes me and thanks me for tweeting while he goes to attend to delivering extra books to creators from the shop?

HeroesCon is special in those ways. It’s not about the big press push, but reminding the world that comics and the people who make them can be pretty great. And that everyone can and should be welcome in their fandoms, despite whatever state laws exist in North Carolina or in the patriarchal confines of old fandom structures.

Review: Peter Parker Spectacular Spider-Man #1

Spidey definitely has the jokes in the new series Peter Parker Spectacular Spider-Man #1 from one of comics’ greatest comedy writers Chip Zdarsky, stellar and steady artist Adam Kubert, and colorist extraordinaire Jordie Bellaire. (It rhymes on purpose.) Instead of trying to tell some epic, interweaving crossover story or as a vehicle for his Batman fan fiction, Zdarsky and Kubert focus on the humorous and relational sides of Spider-Man. In this issue, he stops a mugger, basically goes on a date with Johnny Storm, sets up a date with a new character which he will probably miss, and there’s a soap opera ending. Sure, there might be one or two too many guest stars, but a little bit of comedy covers a multitude of gratuitous superhero cameos.

In its page layout, Spectacular Spider-Man #1 evokes the art of late 80s/early 90s “hot” artists Erik Larsen and Todd McFarlane, who tried to make every double page spread a poster you wanted to throw up on your bedroom wall unless you were one of those Goth kids that liked Sandman and Sandman alone. Except Adam Kubert is a hell of a storyteller, who kicks off the issue Manhattan style with an aerial shot of Spider-Man and his (boy)friend Human Torch eating shawarma on a New York rooftop after a frenetic opening page that both retells his origin and pokes fun at the incessant retellings of his origin in both comics and films. In his art style, Kubert strikes a balance between the cartoonish goofiness of, say, Erica Henderson and the strong superhero work of Andy Kubert. There’s punching, web swinging, and size changing when Ant-Man pops up, but Kubert leaves the page open for Zdarsky’s banter with bright pops of color from Bellaire, who is operating in happy superhero mode.

Chip Zdarsky and Adam Kubert spend most of the time with Spider-Man in costume because his weak Breaking Bad puns as Peter Parker either fall flat or work as excellent “your parents just spent a weekend binging Better Call Saul and didn’t answer any of your calls” jokes. Plus it sets up excellent sight gags like Spidey trying and failing to do a good cop/bad cop routine when he investigates a hacked phone in Chicago. (His costume is too damn bright.) Kubert brings the iconic splash pages while Zdarsky brings Spidey back to Earth with awkward phone conversations with Aunt May about the copyright friendly version of Tinder or freaking out about his powers when it was really just Ant-Man lending a helping hand.  Spider-Man is still about power and responsibility, but Zdarsky and Kubert show him struggling with his web fluid (This leads to so much dirty subtext if your mind’s in the gutter.) and freaking out whether to call or text back a standup comedian named Rebecca that he rescued earlier. Spidey is back to protecting ordinary people, being awkward and funny, and occasionally geeking out about science until Zdarsky pulls the proverbial rug out with a couple reveals in the last few pages.

And like a post-credits sting that stands alone as a complete narrative and adds a certain level of intrigue to the main plot, Chip Zdarsky, Goran Parlov, and Nathan Fairbarn cook up a one one one battle between Spider-Man and his fellow arachnid themed superhero, Black Widow. Zdarsky gives Spider-Man all the goofy, pleading dialogue he can handle while keeping Natasha silent and stoic until the final couple pages. She’s there to kick Spider-Man’s ass, and Parlov’s return into interior art is a true tour de force of action choreography. Spidey isn’t as good of a martial artist as Black Widow so he focuses on his speed, agility, and Spider sense as he dodges kicks that would incapacitate any ordinary person. However, his powerful figures aren’t lost under the speed lines, and you can see every move as the fight progresses. The backup makes you wish that Marvel would let Parlov draw an action-driven comic featuring any Marvel hero. Hell, he could even make Stilt-Man look badass.

If you want a Spider-Man comic that reminds you of flipping through comics with big, open layouts by John Romita Sr, Todd McFarlane, or Mark Bagley and still has a quirky, clever, and occasionally adult sense of humor, then Peter Parker Spectacular Spider-Man #1 is the book for you. Chip Zdarsky is truly the king of comedy featuring iconic pop culture characters with his playful, sometimes encyclopedic, and joke-a-minute approach to the webslinger just like he did with Jughead for Archie.

Story: Chip Zdarsky Art: Adam Kubert Colors: Jordie Bellaire
Backup Art: Goran Parlov Backup Color: Nathan Fairbarn
Story: 9.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #1

Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #1

(W) Chip Zdarsky (A/CA) Adam Kubert
Rated T
In Shops: Jun 21, 2017
SRP: $4.99

SPIDER-MAN RETURNS TO THE FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD!
The webslinging, wallcrawling wonder returns to New York City in the all-new PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN. A companion series to the best-selling Amazing Spider-Man series, Peter Parker is going back-to-basics for big heroics in the Big Apple. Featuring adversaries old and new, be there as Spider-Man returns to his friendly neighborhood for his never ending battle against crime and the dreaed “Parker Luck”.

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