Tag Archives: carlos trigo

Review: Chainsaw Reindeer

Chainsaw Reindeer

Chainsaw Reindeer is an interesting comic. The concept has some humor to it but the execution turns into one repeated joke with a lot of cringe-worthy in between.

Created and written by Brandon Rhiness, Chainsaw Reindeer is about a reindeer who is tired of Santa’s abuse goes on a revenge spree against mankind. The abuse? Lots of beatings and for some reason multiple implied rapes. A mean Santa who’s an asshole would be enough but Rhiness takes everything so over the top it makes one groan.

And that over the top attitude extends to the comic forgoing much of a story consists of nine-panel pages featuring a reindeer chainsawing people. It’s so over the top I found myself laughing at parts but at the same time, the comic isn’t quite as funny or as clever as it thinks it is. It’s juvenile humor at best and if that’s your thing more power to you.

Carlos Trigo delivers the bloody art. Along with colors by Przemyslaw and lettering by Chris Johnson the humor is in the images. There’s little dialogue and the joke is in what’s cut off by a chainsaw and where. Locations around the world play to stereotypes and implied abuse in the beginning makes one shudder. If you laugh at the images, this is a comic for you. It’s all over the top.

Chainsaw Reindeer is a one-note joke that only differs slightly when played. It’s a great concept that’s never quite realized as it sticks to cheap and cringe-worthy laughs.

Story: Brandon Rhiness Art: Carlos Trigo
Color: Przemyslaw Letters: Chris Johnson
Story: 5.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Action Lab: Danger Zone provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for you

Preview: Chainsaw Reindeer

CHAINSAW REINDEER ONE-SHOT

Writer(s): Brandon Rhiness
Artist Name(s): Carlos Trigo (pencils, inks) Przemyslaw Dedelis (colors) Nicholas O’Gorman (letters)
Cover Artist(s): Carlos Trigo
24 pgs./ M / FC
$3.99

Chainsaw Reindeer is the story of one of Santa’s reindeer who…snaps. Sick of Santa’s abuse, the Reindeer grabs a chainsaw and the slaughter begins.

Unsatisfied with simply laying waste the North Pole, the Reindeer brings his un-meticulous massacring to the four corners of the Earth, killing every human (and animal) in his path.

Can anyone stop the Chainsaw Reindeer?

No.

CHAINSAW REINDEER ONE-SHOT

Chainsaw Reindeer: A reindeer has enough of Santa’s abuse and embarks on a world-wide swath of destruction… with a chainsaw!

That’s right, the latest creator-owned release from Action Lab: Danger ZoneChainsaw Reindeer, by writer Brandon Rhiness and artist Carlos Trigo, features one of Santa’s reindeer on a murderous chainsaw rampage! And when killing at the North Pole isn’t enough to satisfy his blood lust, he starts a massacre around the world! This will make a wonderful mature readers Christmas gift for all you naughty boys and girls!

The comic features colors by Przemyslaw Dedelis and lettering by Nicholas O’Gorman. Check out all the gore and destruction in the Chainsaw Reindeer One-Sho which will be in a comic book store near you on September 11, 2019.

Review: Hero Hourly #2

hero-hourly-preview-page-01Alright, I’m going to go out on a limb here and assume you’ve had to take a job to make ends meet; for me it was surveying work laying sewer lines where on one particularly hot day there was a bit of an issue. I was voluntold to remove a blockage from a live sewer (some idiot had dropped their work glove into a sewer pipe, causing a bit of a backup in the pipe) because I was the only one on the crew thin enough to fit in the man hole. I needed the job so I took a shovel and a bucket on a rope down the hole. I’ll go a bit further on that limb and assume there’s been a guy at your job that does the bare minimum to get by, and as much as you want to punch them, you need your job. It’s the only one you have.

Now imagine that job is being a superhero.

That James Patrick is able tell a story about the struggles of making ends meet, the perceived indignity of people who feel that they’re too good for a minimum wage position finally being forced to strap on a uniform or pick up a shovel so that they don’t starve that just happens to be wrapped up in a superhero comic that is probably one of the best I’ve read in a long time is, frankly, fantastic.

The second issue continues to follow Saul as he tries to make the best of his situation after a promising future turned into a life of being punched in the face for basic pay and some average benefits. James Patrick is able to take most comic book fans dream of developing superpowers (come on, are you telling me you wouldn’t love to be able to fly around and punch people through a wall? Really?) and turning it into such a relatable day to day employment story. The comic is funny, with the banter between Saul‘s roommates and his internal monologue never failing to make me laugh, and coupled with Carlos Trigo‘s art that fits the comic wonderfully, turn Hero Hourly into one of the best miniseries I’ve picked up in a long time.

Hero Hourly is a unique take on the whole concept of superheroing, that many readers should find incredibly interesting. Rather than fighting the good fight because it’s the right thing to do, these men and women take their daily super serum, don a cape and cowl to fight crime because it’s the only job they can find, and they have to (struggle to) pay the bills. There are no secret identities amongst the employees at the company, and Saul certainly makes no attempt to hide his current profession, which only adds to the sense that the superheroing job at the company formerly known as Hero Hourly is as mundane as can be.

Oh, but the comic isn’t.

It is, somewhat surprisingly, perfectly possible to read Hero Hourly #2 as a standalone issue, despite being the second part of a three issue miniseries. What that means is that if, for some inexplicable reason, you haven’t read the first issue that you can still enjoy the second issue when you pick it up at your favourite comic book vendor.

And you should. You really should.

Story: James Patrick Art: Carlos Trigo Colours: Alex Sollazzo
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.75 Recommendation: Buy. Buy It Yesterday.

 

21 Pulp provided Graphic Policy a FREE copy for review, which is awesome  because I got to read it early, but I picked up my print copy anyway because this comic is absolutely amazing.

Review: Hero Hourly #2

hero-hourly-preview-page-01I came across an interesting quote via my twitter feed the other day from @existentialcoms:

“A good novel distracts you from how shitty life is.

A great novel makes you realize that life is shitty in ways you never even thought of.”

I’m going to add/paraphrase a third refrain: “a great comic book makes you realize that life is shitty in ways you never even dared to think of.” Hero Hourly #2 is such a great book. If you haven’t picked this one up, rush out and buy it, and if you can find issue #1 pick that one up too (even if you have to pay a premium).

I connect to this one at all levels. It’s a funny fast page-turner that leaves you wanting more. I haven’t laughed this hard reading a comic book in a very long time.

It’s for all of us whom have had our dreams stepped on, but yet persevere to live our lives with dignity, in spite of it all. It’s a humanistic existential, but profane, action comedy with heart. Saul is the hero we all want to be: the gal or guy who goes to work everyday in and out looking for a little recognition, a small display of appreciation from their corporate overlords– and if we don’t get it today, maybe tomorrow. The art can be a bit cartoony, but it meshes well with the comedic story.

I’m going to have to reach out to the editors at Graphic Policy to add a new rating for this one. It’s not a BUY; it’s a BUY2. Get two copies; they might appreciate enough in value one day to be able to sell them to pay off your mortgage to avoid The Foreclosure.

Story & Art: James Patrick Letters: Carlos Trigo
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Hero Hourly #2

hero-hourly-preview-page-01The most enjoyable book of the year. Yes, I’m calling it already.

Hero Hourly is easily the funniest book in years. Constant, inappropriate and laugh-out loud humor waits on every page.

In a corporate ruled by middle management, defined by rules that make no sense and plagued by the laziest co-workers imaginable, even superheroes aren’t immune. In this world, wearing a mask and matching underwear outside your one-piece suit is the same thing as wearing a green apron. Of course, being an hourly employee at a company that specializes in super heroics has its own drawbacks. Imagine instead of dealing with a pain-in-the-ass customer you had to deal with Godzilla.

The book features Saul, our modest narrator trying to get ahead in the world. Armed with a brightly colored suit and a great attitude, he’s taking on the dangers and frustrations life throws his way.

Something that should be made very is clear is that this is not a book that stars a funny protagonist. Every person in this book has great lines, the kind that get you stuck re-reading individual panels out of amusement. This book is an authentic work of comedy from start to finish. While comics like Spider-Man know their character should be funny and struggle to somehow make it work, Hero Hourly shows the web-slinger how it’s done. Reminiscent of books like the original Tick and Quantum & Woody, the title captures the nostalgia of when reading comics was purely fun. It reminded me of when I was a boy reading Wizard Magazine back when it was funny and… still a thing.

Certainly not an all-ages read, Hero Hourly doesn’t shy away from adult language or themes. However, when paired with the cartoonish stylings of Carlos Trigo, this makes for a very disarming feel, rather than a crass grab at toilet-humor. Trigo’s work also helps capture the absurdity of modern life. Yes, everything in this book is surprisingly relatable to the working class, even as its main characters are forced to undergo sexual harassment sensitivity training for a mishandled rescue.

The book isn’t easy to find so make sure you start calling your local book stores now to see who will be carrying the second issue this Wednesday. The first issue is listed for an average of ten dollars on eBay.com but truth be told it’s probably best to go directly to the publisher to order the first issue. This three-issue miniseries from 21 Pulp will be what you’re loaning to your friends and insisting they read years from now.

Story: James Patrick Art: Carlos Trigo
Story: 10 Art: 8 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Preview: Hero Hourly #2

Hero Hourly #2

Written by James Patrick,
Drawn by Carlos Trigo
Colors by Alex Sollazzo
Lettered by ET Dollman

Everyone has one of those days at work. The one where nothing goes right. Where the copy machine jams or you spill coffee on your pants. Saul’s about to have one at Hero Hourly, and let’s just say it’s not exactly the same.

HERO HOURLY PREVIEW PAGE 01

Review: Hero Hourly #1

Hero Hourly coverI’m willing to bet that you’ve worked a job just for the paycheck, whether it be flipping burgers or asking if you’ve tried turning it on and off again. Sometimes those jobs are taken when we’re young and just starting out in the work force, but sometimes we take them because there is nothing else available; and so we find ourselves fighting through minimum wage and battling stupid corporate policies just to put food on the table. Welcome to Hero Hourly, where you get paid $9.75 an hour to save the world, and your job still sucks.

But while their job may suck just as much as yours, the comic sure doesn’t.

Written by James Patrick (Batman, Green Arrow), Hero Hourly is a unique take on the whole concept of superheroing. Rather than fighting the good fight because it’s the right thing to do, these men and women do it because there’s a paycheck involved at the end of the day (although maybe not a very good one), and there are some fairly decent benefits. That probably sounds familiar to a lot of us, minus the yellow spandex, that is. With Hero Hourly James Patrick has delivered the opening salvo in a three issue mini series that manages to be both relevant to today’s economic problems, and yet timeless in it’s approach to the back drop of the tale; most of us have had jobs where we counted down to the weekend. On top of that, though, indeed even because of it, this is a funny comic. Maybe because the story has struck so closely to periods in my life, but I absolutely love this series.

Issue #1 follows Saul as his life takes a series of turns from a promising career to getting punched in the face in a mask, before experiencing the all too mundane side of the superhero business. Watching him suffer through work place politics, unemployment and misery is fantastic; it’s not exactly a good trait to watch somebody suffer, but when it’s as funny as Hero Hourly #1, how can you not enjoy it? Carlos Trigo (2000AD) does some really great work here that compliments the dialogue between characters like milk does cookies (especially the scenes depicting Saul‘s first day on the job – oh man). Hero Hourly is a breath of fresh air, and as the first offering from 21 Pulp that I’ve read, it really excites me for what else this promising new company has up their sleeve (and Graphic Policy have an interview with James Patrick where he gives a little away about what’s coming down the pipeline).

Hero Hourly #1 is part one of a three part miniseries published by James Patrick‘s new publishing company 21 Pulp, that is absolutely worth your time and money.

Story: James Patrick Art: Carlos Trigo Colours: Alex Sollazzo
Story: 9.5 Art: 9 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

21 Pulp provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Hero Hourly #1

Hero Hourly #1

Creators: James Patrick (Batman Confidential, Green Arrow, Joker’s Asylum: Harley Quinn), Carlos Trigo (2,000 AD), and Alex Sollazzo (Morning Glories).

Welcome to Hero Hourly! If Saul thought that working as a superhero would be any different than asking if you want fries with that, he was sorely mistaken. Now he has to deal with bad pay, passive-aggressive bosses, work politics, and that one jerk who never carries his weight. We all have to start somewhere, and Saul’s going to learn that the best thing for a person might just be a hard-day’s work.

HERO HOURLY COVER

Early Review: Hero Hourly #1

Hero Hourly coverI’m willing to bet that you’ve worked a job just for the paycheck, whether it be flipping burgers or asking if you’ve tried turning it on and off again. Sometimes those jobs are taken when we’re young and just starting out in the work force, but sometimes we take them because there is nothing else available; and so we find ourselves fighting through minimum wage and battling stupid corporate policies just to put food on the table. Welcome to Hero Hourly, where you get paid $9.75 an hour to save the world, and your job still sucks.

But while their job may suck just as much as yours, the comic sure doesn’t.

Written by James Patrick (Batman, Green Arrow), Hero Hourly is a unique take on the whole concept of superheroing. Rather than fighting the good fight because it’s the right thing to do, these men and women do it because there’s a paycheck involved at the end of the day (although maybe not a very good one), and there are some fairly decent benefits. That probably sounds familiar to a lot of us, minus the yellow spandex, that is. With Hero Hourly James Patrick has delivered the opening salvo in a three issue mini series that manages to be both relevant to today’s economic problems, and yet timeless in it’s approach to the back drop of the tale; most of us have had jobs where we counted down to the weekend. On top of that, though, indeed even because of it, this is a funny comic. Maybe because the story has struck so closely to periods in my life, but I absolutely love this series.

Issue #1 follows Saul as his life takes a series of turns from a promising career to getting punched in the face in a mask, before experiencing the all too mundane side of the superhero business. Watching him suffer through work place politics, unemployment and misery is fantastic; it’s not exactly a good trait to watch somebody suffer, but when it’s as funny as Hero Hourly #1, how can you not enjoy it? Carlos Trigo (2000AD) does some really great work here that compliments the dialogue between characters like milk does cookies (especially the scenes depicting Saul‘s first day on the job – oh man). Hero Hourly is a breath of fresh air, and as the first offering from 21 Pulp that I’ve read, it really excites me for what else this promising new company has up their sleeve (and Graphic Policy have an interview with James Patrick where he gives a little away about what’s coming down the pipeline).

Hero Hourly #1 is part one of a three part miniseries published by James Patrick‘s new publishing company 21 Pulp, that is absolutely worth your time and money. Originally funded as part of a Kickstarter campaign, the digital copies of the first issue have already been distributed to backers already, and with print copies scheduled to hit the racks on November 18th, now is an ideal time to let your retailer know you want to add this comic to your pull list.

Story: James Patrick Art: Carlos Trigo Colours: Alex Sollazzo
Story: 9.5 Art: 9 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

21 Pulp provided a FREE copy for review, but I have added this to my pull list, and will be buying it next month. I hope you do, too.

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