Tag Archives: brian buccellato

Legendary Comics’ Pokémon Detective Pikachu is Out Now

The highly anticipated Pokémon Detective Pikachu graphic novel adaptation from Legendary Comics, in collaboration with The Pokémon Company International, is now available for purchase online. Last summer’s popular big-screen adventure starred Ryan Reynolds as the adorable super-sleuth Detective Pikachu and was the first-ever live action Pokémon movie. Fans are now invited to relive the adventures of Tim Goodman and his crime-solving Detective Pikachu partner in comic form.

The graphic novel is written by Brian Buccellato with art by Nelson Dániel and draws inspiration from the film that is based on the beloved Pokémon brand—one of the world’s most popular, multi-generation entertainment properties and one of the most successful media franchises of all time. Readers are invited to follow along as lead character Tim Goodman, played in the movie by Justice Smith, journeys through Ryme City searching for his missing father. With twists and turns around every corner, nothing is more twist-y than Tim’s unexpected partner: a Pikachu with a penchant for coffee and danger, and the amazing ability to speak human language. In a city where humans and Pokémon live together in harmony, unexpected dangers surround them as they try to solve a mystery.

Pokémon Detective Pikach

Lost in Space: Countdown to Danger Volume Three is Out Now

Legendary Comics has released the third volume of the popular graphic novel series: Lost in Space: Countdown to Danger, based on the smash-hit rebirth of the beloved sci-fi classic television show. Fans eagerly awaiting the Season Two premiere of the Netflix Original show on December 24 can dive deeper into all-new thrilling backstories of the show’s favorite heroic characters, with a special focus on Don West, Judy, John and Maureen. The graphic novel, penned by writer Brian Buccellato with stunning artwork by Zid, is now on sale in comic stores and online.

Thirty years in the future, en route to a distant colony, the Robinson family finds itself thrown off-course when their ship crash-lands on a mysterious and dangerous planet. On this strange new world, they encounter a hostile environment and an enigmatic alien robot. In order to survive, the Robinson family must rely on their training, and they’ll discover that no matter how lost they are, their family is their home. The graphic series offers readers the chance to explore new missions, not aired on television, as our heroes struggle to survive in an unknown world full of new creatures, unexpected visitors, and new danger.

Volume Three features two new storylines. When Judy Robinson receives a distress signal, she jumps into her chariot and races off to help in true Robinson fashion. But, when Don tags along for the ride, tensions rise and Judy suspects Don of keeping a secret from her. The second chapter follows John and Maureen, who after narrowing escaping death, start the trek back to their Jupiter. When their lives are threatened by dangerous animals, it takes experiences both new and old to survive another day.

Lost in Space: Countdown to Danger

ECCC 2019: Detective Pikachu Gets a Graphic Novel

In anticipation of this summer’s big-screen adventure Pokémon Detective Pikachu, the first-ever live-action Pokémon movie with a cast led by Ryan Reynolds opening May 10, Legendary Comics announced at Emerald City Comic Con the official movie graphic novel Pokémon Detective Pikachu. Written by Brian Buccellato, with art by Nelson Dániel, it is set to debut online and in stores in Summer 2019, following the film’s release.

The graphic novel draws inspiration from the upcoming film that is based on the beloved Pokémon brand—one of the world’s most popular, multi-generation entertainment properties and one of the most successful media franchises of all time. Readers are invited to follow along as lead character Tim Goodman, played in the movie by Justice Smith, journeys through Ryme City searching for his missing father. With twists and turns around every corner, nothing is more twist-y than Tim’s unexpected partner: a Pikachu with a penchant for coffee and danger, and the amazing ability to speak human language. In a city where humans and Pokémon live together in harmony, unexpected dangers surround them as they try to solve a mystery.

Pokémon Detective Pikachu

Preview: Lowlifes

Lowlifes

Brian Buccellato (w) • Alexis Sentenac (a & c)

Human lives are supposed to be priceless. Theirs are worthless. Los Angeles is not all sunshine, surfing, and red carpets. Behind the facade, the City of Angels is an illicit, morally ambiguous world of fading dreams. Grand is a revenge-seeking cop clinging to the good man he was. Leonard is an addict who wants his family back. Rip is a haunted thug embroiled in underground fighting. And Wendall is the criminal corruptor pulling all of their strings. In the seedy L.A. underworld, lives intersect like freeway overpasses. When Wendall’s poker game is robbed, three lowlifes attempt to stay one step ahead of each other, because redemption or destruction is their only ticket out.

TPB • FC • $19.99 • 128 pages • 8 1/4” x 11” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-376-6

Lowlifes

Wonder Woman, Titans, Swamp Thing, and The Flash Get Giant at Walmart

DC announced today that it’s expanding its line of comics currently exclusive to Walmart. The publisher is increasing the slate of 100-Page Giant comics from four to six. In addition, two titles from the original lineup will be re-titled and renumbered as #1 issues. All titles, including the Superman 100-Page Giant featuring Tom King with Andy Kubert and the Batman 100-Page Giant featuring Brian Michael Bendis and Nick Derington, will arrive in participating U.S. Walmart retail stores by Sunday, February 17.

Additions to the lineup include the Swamp Thing 100-Page Giant #1 and The Flash 100-Page Giant #1. As with the other Walmart titles, each book will retail at $4.99 and combine new original stories with “flashback” content from popular DC story eras such as DC Rebirth, the New Age of Heroes and the New 52.

The debut issue of the Swamp Thing 100-Page Giant includes an original story, “Desert of Ash,” written by Tim Seeley, with art by Mike Perkins. This 12-page tale features Swamp Thing and his witch companion Briar as they face the pyromaniac Char Man, who possesses the ability to control flames, a power granted by the elemental spirits of fire itself. Issues #2 and #3 feature “Bog of Blood,” a two-parter by Seeley with art by Joëlle Jones, which introduces a terrifying and potentially supernatural slasher stalking the swamps of Louisiana.

This 100-page spectacular also includes fan-favorite stories from DC’s New 52 period, including Jeff Lemire, Travel Foreman, and Dan Green’s “The Hunt,” from Animal Man, in addition to “Raise Dem Bones,” from the New 52 Swamp Thing by writer Scott Snyder and Yanick Paquette, plus “Death in a Small Town,” featuring Detective Chimp and Shadowpact.

Swamp Thing 100-Page Giant

The Flash 100-Page Giant #1 features an all-new tale of the Scarlet Speedster, written by Gail Simone with art by Clayton Henry. In the 12-part arc “Glass Houses,” Barry Allen is dedicated to keeping the streets of Central City safe as the Fastest Man Alive. But when his old foe Mirror Master shows up looking to cause trouble, it’s up to the Flash to stop him. This book also debuts classic tales of the New 52 version of the Flash by Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato, in addition to the spacefaring adventures of Adam Strange from 2004 by Andy Diggle and Pasqual Ferry, plus the classic New 52 “rebirth” of the World’s Mightiest Mortal, Shazam, from Geoff Johns and Gary Frank.

The Flash 100-Page Giant #1

Both the Justice League of America and Teen Titans Giants will retain their same contents but continue with new cover titles and will be renumbered with #1 issues. The Justice League of America 100-Page Giant becomes Wonder Woman 100-Page Giant #1, continuing the original Wonder Woman story by Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti ,Tom Derenick, and Chad Hardin, with “flashback” stories from Geoff Johns’ New 52 Justice League and Aquaman, plus 2006’s “Who Is Wonder Woman?” by Allan Heinberg, Rachel Dodson, and Terry Dodson.

Wonder Woman 100-Page Giant #1

The Teen Titans 100-Page Giant continues as Titans 100-Page Giant #1, with writer Dan Jurgens continuing his original story with art by Scot Eaton and Wayne Faucher. In addition, the book will continue the ongoing reprint stories from Geoff Johns and Tom Grummett’s Teen Titans from 2004, Peter Tomasi’s Super Sons from 2017’s DC Rebirth and Kenneth Rocafort, Dan DiDio, and Max Raynor’s Sideways from the New Age of Heroes.

Titans 100-Page Giant #1

Each 100-page comic sells for $4.99 and are available in more than 3,000 participating Walmart retailers in the United States.

Preview: Lowlifes #4 (of 4)

Lowlifes #4 (of 4)

Brian Buccellato (w) • Alexis Sentenac (a) • Brian Buccellato (c)

In the seedy Los Angeles underworld, lives intersect like freeway overpasses. When a crime boss’s poker game is robbed, three lowlifes—a bad cop, a drug addict, and a haunted criminal—attempt to stay one step ahead of each other, because redemption or destruction is their only ticket out…

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Preview: Lowlifes #3 (of 4)

Lowlifes #3 (of 4)

Brian Buccellato (w) • Alexis Sentenac (a) • Brian Buccellato (c)

In the seedy Los Angeles underworld, lives intersect like freeway overpasses. When a crime boss’s poker game is robbed, three lowlifes—a bad cop, a drug addict, and a haunted criminal—attempt to stay one step ahead of each other, because redemption or destruction is their only ticket out…

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Preview: Lowlifes #2 (of 4)

Lowlifes #2 (of 4)

Brian Buccellato (w) • Alexis Sentenac (a) • Brian Buccellato (c)

In the seedy Los Angeles underworld, lives intersect like freeway overpasses. When a crime boss’s poker game is robbed, three lowlifes—a bad cop, a drug addict, and a haunted thug—attempt to stay one step ahead of the others, as redemption or destruction is their only ticket out…

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Preview: Lowlifes #1

Lowlifes #1

Brian Buccellato (w) • Alexis Sentenac (a) • Brian Buccellato (c)

In the seedy Los Angeles underworld, lives intersect like freeway overpasses. When a crime boss’s poker game is robbed, three lowlifes—a bad cop, a drug addict, and a haunted thug—attempt to stay one step ahead of the others, as redemption or destruction is their only ticket out…

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Review: Lowlifes #1

There should be a trigger warning on Brian Buccellato’s inaugural issue of Lowlifes, since IDW Publishing neglected to do so, I am giving one for my review.

Lowlifes #1 has the violence that you would expect from a comic with a dead woman on the cover but it also has scenes and talk about a brutal rape and continued harassment by the victims still free rapist. Lowlifes starts with a flash forward that ends with a literal bang before jumping to introduce us to the world of the characters. Buccellato weaves a story of Richard, a cop set out for vengeance, Leonard (Lenny) who starts the story in a shady gun deal in a car and, and Wendell an unseen force that connects the story.

While this premiere issue clues us in on the three main characters, it doesn’t actually explain what’s going on with the story. The only person who we get to know is Richard and we discover more about his wife than we do about him.

The gritty, muted artwork by Alexis Sentenac goes well with the story that Buccellato aims to tell and the palette choices prepare the readers for the story of rape, murder, and brutal violence that Lowlifes explores. It’s reminiscent of early 80s depiction of Hell’s Kitchen in Daredevil. While Sentenac’s style matches the story it isn’t very original and seems kind of stale and derivative. Some of the panels reminded me too much of 80’s comics. It’s not necessarily a bad thing because it serves it’s purpose but it lacks the unique charm, shadows, and ominous tone of the original. Some of the panels seemed like things I’ve seen before. The comic isn’t very pretty, and it shouldn’t because of the story, but usually when this style of art is used the artist attempts to tweak it and make it into another character in the story. Sentenac just misses the mark in that aspect. Considering the material that Sentenac was working with, he does a pretty good and gets high praise from me for the way he frames the rape flashback. It’s not sensationalized and seems rather respectful to the female form and the character.

Overall, the comic isn’t bad but it wasn’t great either. It’s kind of underwhelming. If Buccellato was only going to focus on one character he could have let us into the characters life more. Instead he shows us the age old trope of man seeking revenge for his raped love because he didn’t arrive in time to save her. The scenario is very predictable until it’s ludicrous. Richard doesn’t manage to actually arrest the guy, even though he chases him and the rapist harasses his wife with presents after the attack because he was never charged. While that does happen, the particulars of the way things go down are highly unlikely. You can tell the rape storyline was written by a man because of how he thinks it goes down and what’s worse it appears to be a man who has never watched a crime procedural because, if he had he would have know that there were other ways to catch this guy and, if he knew that then Richard, a cop, would have known that too.

I realize that the story needs something to propel itself forward and explain why a “good cop” would get involved with a criminal but the reasoning doesn’t make sense. I don’t approve of using a woman’s suffering to propel a man’s story as a general rule but the hackneyed, unrealistic and, implausible way that Buccellato writes this scenario makes it a boring story. The story is 20 pages in a 34 page comic and perhaps the issue would have made more sense, been more cohesive, and given more backstory if they had afforded the creative team more pages. I know more about Richard’s wife than I do about him and if he’s a central character, then her story shouldn’t be the driving force in his. It’s cliched and it’s been done before and better.

Even taking the haphazardly rehashing of a sexual assault out of the equation, the story itself is very one dimensional and rather boring, much like the art work it is paint by numbers and tries to contain everything the writer heard that a story like this should contain but lacks the heart , soul and levels that people who have done it before used to make it work.

Story: Brian Buccellato Art: Alexis Sentenac
Story: 5.4 Art: 6.5 Overall: 5.9 Recommendation: Read

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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