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LaGuardia Wins the Hugo Award for “Best Graphic Story or Comic”

LaGuardia

The winners of the 2020 Hugo Awards have been announced. LaGuardia, written by Nnedi Okorafor with art by Tana Ford, colors by James Devlin, and published by Berger Books and Dark Horse won for “Best Graphic Story or Comic.”

The Awards were presented on August 1, 2020 at a ceremony at the 78th World Science Fiction Convention in New Zealand, which was entirely virtual due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Check out below for the full list of nominess and winners this year. Congrats to everyone.

Best Novel

  • A Memory Called Empire, by Arkady Martine (Tor; Tor UK)
  • The City in the Middle of the Night, by Charlie Jane Anders (Tor; Titan)
  • Gideon the Ninth, by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Light Brigade, by Kameron Hurley (Saga; Angry Robot UK)
  • Middlegame, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Ten Thousand Doors of January, by Alix E. Harrow (Redhook; Orbit UK)

Best Novella

  • This Is How You Lose the Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone (Saga Press; Jo Fletcher Books)
  • “Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom”, by Ted Chiang (Exhalation (Borzoi/Alfred A. Knopf; Picador)
  • The Deep, by Rivers Solomon, with Daveed Diggs, William Hutson & Jonathan Snipes (Saga Press/Gallery)
  • The Haunting of Tram Car 015, by P. Djèlí Clark (Tor.com Publishing)
  • In an Absent Dream, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • To Be Taught, If Fortunate, by Becky Chambers (Harper Voyager; Hodder & Stoughton)

Best Novelette

  • Emergency Skin, by N.K. Jemisin (Forward Collection (Amazon))
  • “The Archronology of Love”, by Caroline M. Yoachim (Lightspeed, April 2019)
  • “Away With the Wolves”, by Sarah Gailey (Uncanny Magazine: Disabled People Destroy Fantasy Special Issue, September/October 2019)
  • “The Blur in the Corner of Your Eye”, by Sarah Pinsker (Uncanny Magazine, July-August 2019)
  • “For He Can Creep”, by Siobhan Carroll (Tor.com, 10 July 2019)
  • “Omphalos”, by Ted Chiang (Exhalation (Borzoi/Alfred A. Knopf; Picador))

Best Short Story

  • As the Last I May Know”, by S.L. Huang (Tor.com, 23 October 2019)
  • “And Now His Lordship Is Laughing”, by Shiv Ramdas (Strange Horizons, 9 September 2019)
  • “Blood Is Another Word for Hunger”, by Rivers Solomon (Tor.com, 24 July 2019)
  • “A Catalog of Storms”, by Fran Wilde (Uncanny Magazine, January/February 2019)
  • “Do Not Look Back, My Lion”, by Alix E. Harrow (Beneath Ceaseless Skies, January 2019)
  • “Ten Excerpts from an Annotated Bibliography on the Cannibal Women of Ratnabar Island”, by Nibedita Sen (Nightmare Magazine, May 2019)

Best Series

  • The Expanse, by James S. A. Corey (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • InCryptid, by Seanan McGuire (DAW)
  • Luna, by Ian McDonald (Tor; Gollancz)
  • Planetfall series, by Emma Newman (Ace; Gollancz)
  • Winternight Trilogy, by Katherine Arden (Del Rey; Del Rey UK)
  • The Wormwood Trilogy, by Tade Thompson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

Best Related Work

  • “2019 John W. Campbell Award Acceptance Speech”, by Jeannette Ng
  • Becoming Superman: My Journey from Poverty to Hollywood, by J. Michael Straczynski (Harper Voyager US)
  • Joanna Russ, by Gwyneth Jones (University of Illinois Press (Modern Masters of Science Fiction))
  • The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick, by Mallory O’Meara (Hanover Square)
  • The Pleasant Profession of Robert A. Heinlein, by Farah Mendlesohn (Unbound)
  • Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin, produced and directed by Arwen Curry

Best Graphic Story or Comic

  • LaGuardia, written by Nnedi Okorafor, art by Tana Ford, colours by James Devlin (Berger Books; Dark Horse)
  • Die, Volume 1: Fantasy Heartbreaker, by Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)
  • Monstress, Volume 4: The Chosen, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image)
  • Mooncakes, by Wendy Xu and Suzanne Walker, letters by Joamette Gil (Oni Press; Lion Forge)
  • Paper Girls, Volume 6, written by Brian K. Vaughan, drawn by Cliff Chiang, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image)
  • The Wicked + The Divine, Volume 9: “Okay”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

  • Good Omens, written by Neil Gaiman, directed by Douglas Mackinnon (Amazon Studios/BBC Studios/Narrativia/The Blank Corporation)
  • Avengers: Endgame, screenplay by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo (Marvel Studios)
  • Captain Marvel, screenplay by Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck and Geneva Robertson-Dworet, directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Walt Disney Pictures/Marvel Studios/Animal Logic (Australia))
  • Russian Doll (Season One), created by Natasha Lyonne, Leslye Headland and Amy Poehler, directed by Leslye Headland, Jamie Babbit and Natasha Lyonne (3 Arts Entertainment/Jax Media/Netflix/Paper Kite Productions/Universal Television)
  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, screenplay by Chris Terrio and J.J. Abrams, directed by J.J. Abrams (Walt Disney Pictures/Lucasfilm/Bad Robot)
  • Us, written and directed by Jordan Peele (Monkeypaw Productions/Universal Pictures)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

  • The Good Place: “The Answer”, written by Daniel Schofield, directed by Valeria Migliassi Collins (Fremulon/3 Arts Entertainment/Universal Television)
  • The Expanse: “Cibola Burn”, written by Daniel Abraham & Ty Franck and Naren Shankar, directed by Breck Eisner (Amazon Prime Video)
  • Watchmen: “A God Walks into Abar”, written by Jeff Jensen and Damon Lindelof, directed by Nicole Kassell (HBO)
  • The Mandalorian: “Redemption”, written by Jon Favreau, directed by Taika Waititi (Disney+)
  • Doctor Who: “Resolution”, written by Chris Chibnall, directed by Wayne Yip (BBC)
  • Watchmen: “This Extraordinary Being”, written by Damon Lindelof and Cord Jefferson, directed by Stephen Williams (HBO)

Best Editor, Short Form

  • Ellen Datlow
  • Neil Clarke
  • C.C. Finlay
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas
  • Sheila Williams

Best Editor, Long Form

  • Navah Wolfe
  • Sheila E. Gilbert
  • Brit Hvide
  • Diana M. Pho
  • Devi Pillai
  • Miriam Weinberg

Best Professional Artist

  • John Picacio
  • Tommy Arnold
  • Rovina Cai
  • Galen Dara
  • Yuko Shimizu
  • Alyssa Winans

Best Semiprozine

  • Uncanny Magazine, editors-in-chief Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas, nonfiction/managing editor Michi Trota, managing editor Chimedum Ohaegbu, podcast producers Erika Ensign and Steven Schapansky
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies, editor Scott H. Andrews
  • Escape Pod, editors Mur Lafferty and S.B. Divya, assistant editor Benjamin C. Kinney, audio producers Adam Pracht and Summer Brooks, hosts Tina Connolly and Alasdair Stuart
  • Fireside Magazine, editor Julia Rios, managing editor Elsa Sjunneson, copyeditor Chelle Parker, social coordinator Meg Frank, publisher & art director Pablo Defendini, founding editor Brian White
  • FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction, executive editor Troy L. Wiggins, editors Eboni Dunbar, Brent Lambert, L.D. Lewis, Danny Lore, Brandon O’Brien and Kaleb Russell
  • Strange Horizons, Vanessa Rose Phin, Catherine Krahe, AJ Odasso, Dan Hartland, Joyce Chng, Dante Luiz and the Strange Horizons staff

Best Fanzine

  • The Book Smugglers, editors Ana Grilo and Thea James
  • Galactic Journey, founder Gideon Marcus, editor Janice Marcus, senior writers Rosemary Benton, Lorelei Marcus and Victoria Silverwolf
  • Journey Planet, editors James Bacon, Christopher J Garcia, Alissa McKersie, Ann Gry, Chuck Serface, John Coxon and Steven H Silver
  • nerds of a feather, flock together, editors Adri Joy, Joe Sherry, Vance Kotrla, and The G
  • Quick Sip Reviews, editor Charles Payseur
  • The Rec Center, editors Elizabeth Minkel and Gavia Baker-Whitelaw

Best Fancast

  • Our Opinions Are Correct, presented by Annalee Newitz and Charlie Jane Anders
  • Be The Serpent, presented by Alexandra Rowland, Freya Marske and Jennifer Mace
  • Claire Rousseau’s YouTube channel, produced & presented by Claire Rousseau
  • The Coode Street Podcast, presented by Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe
  • Galactic Suburbia, presented by Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce and Tansy Rayner Roberts, producer Andrew Finch
  • The Skiffy and Fanty Show, presented by Jen Zink and Shaun Duke

Best Fan Writer

  • Bogi Takács
  • Cora Buhlert
  • James Davis Nicoll
  • Alasdair Stuart
  • Paul Weimer
  • Adam Whitehead

Best Fan Artist

  • Elise Matthesen
  • Iain Clark
  • Sara Felix
  • Grace P. Fong
  • Meg Frank
  • Ariela Housman

Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book

  • Catfishing on CatNet, by Naomi Kritzer (Tor Teen)
  • Deeplight, by Frances Hardinge (Macmillan)
  • Dragon Pearl, by Yoon Ha Lee (Disney/Hyperion)
  • Minor Mage, by T. Kingfisher (Argyll)
  • Riverland, by Fran Wilde (Amulet)
  • The Wicked King, by Holly Black (Little, Brown; Hot Key)

Astounding Award for the Best New Science Fiction Writer, sponsored by Dell Magazines

  • R.F. Kuang (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Sam Hawke (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Jenn Lyons (1st year of eligibility)
  • Nibedita Sen (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Tasha Suri (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Emily Tesh (1st year of eligibility)

1945 Retro Hugo Award Finalists

Best Novel

  • “Shadow Over Mars” (The Nemesis from Terra), by Leigh Brackett (Startling Stories, Fall 1944)
  • The Golden Fleece, by Robert Graves (Cassell)
  • Land of Terror, by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.)
  • Sirius: A Fantasy of Love and Discord, by Olaf Stapledon (Secker & Warburg)
  • The Wind on the Moon, by Eric Linklater (Macmillan)
  • “The Winged Man”, by A.E. van Vogt and E. Mayne Hull (Astounding Science Fiction, May-June 1944)

Best Novella

  • “Killdozer!”, by Theodore Sturgeon (Astounding Science Fiction, November 1944)
  • “The Changeling”, by A.E. van Vogt (Astounding Science Fiction, April 1944)
  • “A God Named Kroo”, by Henry Kuttner (Thrilling Wonder Stories, Winter 1944)
  • “Intruders from the Stars”, by Ross Rocklynne (Amazing Stories, January 1944)
  • “The Jewel of Bas”, by Leigh Brackett (Planet Stories, Spring 1944)
  • “Trog”, by Murray Leinster (Astounding Science Fiction, June 1944)

Best Novelette

  • “City”, by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding Science Fiction, May 1944)
  • “Arena”, by Fredric Brown (Astounding Science Fiction, June 1944)
  • “The Big and the Little” (“The Merchant Princes”), by Isaac Asimov (Astounding Science Fiction, August 1944)
  • “The Children’s Hour”, by Lawrence O’Donnell (C.L. Moore and Henry Kuttner) (Astounding Science Fiction, March 1944)
  • “No Woman Born”, by C.L. Moore (Astounding Science Fiction, December 1944)
  • “When the Bough Breaks”, by Lewis Padgett (C.L. Moore and Henry Kuttner) (Astounding Science Fiction, November 1944)

Best Short Story

  • “I, Rocket”, by Ray Bradbury (Amazing Stories, May 1944)
  • “And the Gods Laughed”, by Fredric Brown (Planet Stories, Spring 1944)
  • “Desertion”, by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding Science Fiction, November 1944)
  • “Far Centaurus”, by A. E. van Vogt (Astounding Science Fiction, January 1944)
  •  “Huddling Place”, by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding Science Fiction, July 1944)
  • “The Wedge” (“The Traders”), by Isaac Asimov (Astounding Science Fiction, October 1944)

Best Series

  • The Cthulhu Mythos, by H. P. Lovecraft, August Derleth, and others
  • Captain Future, by Brett Sterling
  • Doc Savage, by Kenneth Robeson/Lester Dent
  • Jules de Grandin, by Seabury Quinn
  • Pellucidar, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • The Shadow, by Maxwell Grant (Walter B. Gibson)

Best Related Work

  • “The Science-Fiction Field”, by Leigh Brackett (Writer’s Digest, July 1944)
  • Fancyclopedia, by Jack Speer (Forrest J. Ackerman)
  • ’42 To ’44: A Contemporary Memoir Upon Human Behavior During the Crisis of the World Revolution, by H.G. Wells (Secker & Warburg)
  • Mr. Tompkins Explores the Atom, by George Gamow (Cambridge University Press)
  • Rockets: The Future of Travel Beyond the Stratosphere, by Willy Ley (Viking Press)
  • “The Works of H.P. Lovecraft: Suggestions for a Critical Appraisal”, by Fritz Leiber (The Acolyte, Fall 1944)

Best Graphic Story or Comic

  • Superman: “The Mysterious Mr. Mxyztplk”, by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (Detective Comics, Inc.)
  • Buck Rogers: “Hollow Planetoid”, by Dick Calkins (National Newspaper Service)
  • Donald Duck: “The Mad Chemist”, by Carl Barks (Dell Comics)
  • Flash Gordon: “Battle for Tropica”, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • Flash Gordon: “Triumph in Tropica”, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • The Spirit: “For the Love of Clara Defoe”, by Manly Wade Wellman, Lou Fine and Don Komisarow (Register and Tribune Syndicate)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

  • The Canterville Ghost, screenplay by Edwin Harvey Blum from a story by Oscar Wilde, directed by Jules Dassin (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM))
  • The Curse of the Cat People, written by DeWitt Bodeen, directed by Gunther V. Fritsch and Robert Wise (RKO Radio Pictures)
  • Donovan’s Brain, adapted by Robert L. Richards from a story by Curt Siodmak, producer, director and editor William Spier (CBS Radio Network)
  • House of Frankenstein, screenplay by Edward T. Lowe, Jr. from a story by Curt Siodmak, directed by Erle C. Kenton (Universal Pictures)
  • The Invisible Man’s Revenge, written by Bertram Millhauser, directed by Ford Beebe (Universal Pictures)
  • It Happened Tomorrow, screenplay and adaptation by Dudley Nichols and René Clair, directed by René Clair (Arnold Pressburger Films)

Best Editor, Short Form

  • John W. Campbell, Jr.
  • Oscar J. Friend
  • Mary Gnaedinger
  • Dorothy McIlwraith
  • Raymond A. Palmer
  • W. Scott Peacock

Best Professional Artist

  • Margaret Brundage
  • Earle Bergey
  • Boris Dolgov
  • Matt Fox
  • Paul Orban
  • William Timmins

Best Fanzine

  • Voice of the Imagi-Nation, edited by Forrest J. Ackerman and Myrtle R. Douglas
  • The Acolyte, edited by Francis T. Laney and Samuel D. Russell
  • Diablerie, edited by Bill Watson
  • Futurian War Digest, edited by J. Michael Rosenblum
  • Shangri L’Affaires, edited by Charles Burbee
  • Le Zombie, edited by Bob Tucker and E.E. Evans

Best Fan Writer

  • Fritz Leiber
  • Morojo/Myrtle R. Douglas
  • J. Michael Rosenblum
  • Jack Speer
  • Bob Tucker
  • Harry Warner, Jr.

The Seeds Concludes in a Deluxe Trade Paperback in December

From esteemed comic all-stars, legendary writer Ann Nocenti and Eisner Award-winning artist David Aja, the hotly anticipated The Seeds miniseries reaches its breathtaking conclusion in a deluxe collected trade paperback arriving December 23, 2020.

Eco-fiction tech thriller-meets-love-story, The Seeds is set in a broken-down world, where a rebellious group of ruthless romantics have fled a tech-obsessed society to create their own… and a few cantankerous aliens have come to harvest the last seeds of humanity.

When one of them falls in love with a human, idealistic journalist Astra stumbles into the story of a lifetime, only to realize that if she reports it, she’ll destroy the last hope of a dying planet. 
How far will she go for the truth?

The Seeds arrives in comic shops December 23, 2020 and everywhere January 5, 2021 for $19.99.

 The Seeds

Check out the Hugo Award’s “Best Graphic Story or Comic” Nominees

Hugo Awards

The nominees for “Best Graphic Story or Comic” for this year’s Hugo Awards have been announced. Normally, the winners are announced at Worldcon but with the event this year canceled due to COVID-19, it’s unknown when the winners will be announced.

The nominees were announced on April 8 and were decided from 1,584 valid nominating ballots with a total of 27,033 nominations. Members nominated up to five works/people in each category, and the top six works/people in each category were shortlisted as finalists.

Check out all of the Hugo nominees and the comic nominees below:

  • Die, Volume 1: Fantasy Heartbreaker, by Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAWZeus Comics

  • LaGuardia, written by Nnedi Okorafor, art by Tana Ford, colors by James Devlin (Berger Books; Dark Horse)

Purchase: AmazonKindle – comiXologyTFAW

  • Monstress, Volume 4: The Chosen, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAW

  • Mooncakes, by Wendy Xu and Suzanne Walker, letters by Joamette Gil (Oni Press; Lion Forge)

Purchase: AmazonTFAW

  • Paper Girls, Volume 6, written by Brian K. Vaughan, drawn by Cliff Chiang, colors by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAWZeus Comics

  • The Wicked + The Divine, Volume 9: “Okay”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie, colors by Matt Wilson, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAWZeus Comics

On top of the comics above, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel are nominated in “Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form,” and Watchmen: “A God Walks into Abar” and Watchmen: “This Extraordinary Being” are nominated in “Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form.”


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Berger Books Expands with Post York

The Dark Horse Comics imprint founded by Karen Berger, Berger Books, welcomes its latest graphic novel—Post York, an innovative expansion of the acclaimed one-shot by James Romberger arriving September 2020.

The polar ice caps have melted, and New York City is flooded beyond recognition. Amidst the ruin, an independent loner along with his cat and only friend, navigates the submerged city as he tries to live another day. But everything changes when he encounters both a mysterious woman and a trapped blue whale. Will they be each other’s salvation. . . or destruction?

Their paths intertwine surprisingly, daringly, dangerously with others from this makeshift community– from outsiders like himself to the depraved and ruthless elite; all struggling to maintain a sense of normalcy in a city drowned in its past.

This eco-fiction fable of epic proportions will arrive on September 2, 2020 and will feature an environmental fact sheet and other bonus material.

Enigma Gets the Deluxe Treatment from Berger Books

Berger Books has announced the release of a deluxe hardcover edition of Peter Milligan and Duncan Fegredo‘s radical and acclaimed Vertigo series Enigma. This definitive edition of Enigma, written by legendary and influential writer Peter Milligan, features a lavish new cover by Duncan Fegredo and a treasure trove of never-before-seen development art from one of comics most singular and dramatic artists. Sherilyn Van Valkenburgh provides the lushly painted color.

Enigma is a visceral, thought-provoking post-modern tale of self-discovery and sexual identity told against the backdrop of outrageous superheroes and villains. Michael Smith lives a meaningless life of routine and boredom. But when the weird characters from Enigma – Michael’s favorite childhood comic book hero – seem to come to life, Smith embarks upon an increasingly obsessive crusade to uncover the incredible secret behind their improbable existence. Teaming up with Enigma’s comic creator, Smith encounters an insanity-inducing psychopath, a brain-eating serial killer, a suicide-inciting Truthsayer, and a teleporting one-time model “who really sends you” as his quest uncovers shocking truths about his idol and ultimately Michael himself.

Enigma will go on sale in fall 2020.

Enigma

NYCC 2019: Peter Milligan and Jesús Hervas Explore a Tomorrow with Only Children

Berger Books has announced an intriguing new story for 2020, Tomorrow– a five-issue comic series by critically acclaimed and legendary writer Peter Milligan, breakout artist Jesús Hervas, and dynamic colorist James Devlin.

When a Russian computer virus jumps the species barrier and wipes out most of the adult population, the world falls precariously into the hands of the next generation.  In the wake of the devastation, musical prodigy Oscar Fuentes is separated from his twin sister Cira. Without the support of each other and stranded on opposite sides of the country, they’re swept into rapidly-evolving networks of gangs. Can Oscar find his way back to Cira… or will they be lost to each other forever, in a dangerous makeshift civilization that is mercilessly replacing the past?

The first issue of Tomorrow goes on sale February 26, 2020.

Tomorrow

See “Everything” this September Courtesy of Cristopher Cantwell, I.N.J. Culbard, and Berger Books

From Christopher Cantwell, acclaimed writer of She Could Fly and co-creator of AMC’s Halt and Catch Fire, and celebrated artist I.N.J. Culbard comes a new monthly ongoing series this fall, Everything. The latest addition to Karen Berger’s critically acclaimed Berger Books imprint at Dark Horse Comics, Everything is a truly bizarre story about the most horrifying pursuit of happiness you’ve ever read.

From wayward teens to lonely housewives and ambitious city officials, most in this otherwise-sleepy Michigan town are thrilled with the arrival of EVERYTHING, a new mega-department store, and its catalog-perfect manager, Shirley. But thrill turns to frenzy, and when bouts of mania, random hellish fires, violent explosions and unshakeable psychic disturbances start to overtake the population, a few—like depressive out-of-towner Lori and a suspicious local named Rick—begin to suspect EVERYTHING might be the cause.

What twisted power has taken hold of Holland, Michigan and its town-folk? Who—or what—exactly is in charge here… and what insidious plans are in store?

The series is described as if “Twin Peaks and Stranger Things had a baby and Ray Bradbury was the godfather.”

The first issue of Everything goes on sale September 4, 2019.

Everything

Ruby Falls’ River Runs Red Again with Ann Nocenti, Flavia Biondi, and Lee Loughridge

From legendary writer Ann Nocenti, extraordinary new talent Flavia Biondi, and acclaimed colorist Lee Loughridge comes Ruby Falls: a neo-noir tale of love, memory, and murder mysteriously woven through three generations of women, and hinging on their individual, intertwined fights for freedom. Ruby Falls, the new four-issue miniseries, is the latest addition to Karen Berger’s critically acclaimed imprint Berger Books at Dark Horse Comics.

Ruby Falls is a sleepy town. But sleep brings nightmares, and 20-something Lana is about to wake up in the middle of her hometown’s biggest secret: the “disappearance” of Betty Gallagher, who was infamous for her progressive ways during the mobster-ruled heyday of this old mining town. The dim details of this cold-case murder are trapped in the mind of Lana’s grandmother Clara, who suffers from dementia. When Clara starts to share these deeply-buried, violent memories with her, Lana is hooked. She becomes obsessed with cracking the case, even if it means snapping the minds of everyone involved, splintering the peaceful town— and putting herself in grave danger.

Ruby Falls is a new kind of noir—a dazzling and unforgettably modern murder mystery with a feminist edge; a story of risk, adventure, passion and trust… until the Ruby Falls river runs red again. The first issue of Ruby Falls goes on sale October 2, 2019.

Ruby Falls

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Criminal #3

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Criminal #3 (Image Comics) – One of the best comics on the market. The current story is a meta look at a certain famous comic convention. How much is true? Well, that’s part of the fun.

Dark Red #1 (AfterShock) – A new series that’s about Vampires in Trump country. The concept sounds really interesting.

Dungeons & Dragons: A Darkened Wish #1 (IDW Publishing) – D&D is the new hotness, and IDW’s series have been fun for those into the game and world. Solid fantasy that’s always worth checking out.

Grumble #5 (Albatross Funnybooks) – A fun and funny series, one we’ll constantly recommend. While not the best place to start, we’re putting the series on your radar so you can catch up and not miss the awesome.

Incursion #2 (Valiant) – Valiant has been knocking it out of the park and this issue is a great example of that. Just a solid mini-series so far that highlights the quality of this publisher.

Invisible Kingdom #1 (Dark Horse Comics/Berger Books) – G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward team up for this Berger Books debut and that’s all we need to know to get excited to check this one out. A sci-fi religious conspiracy concept is icing on the cake of awesome that is the creative team.

Lazarus Risen #1 (Image Comics) – It’s been a while since we read Lazarus so we’ve forgotten a bunch but the series has always been fantastic and amazing and to be able to get more makes us happy. It’s one of the most well thought out series and worlds in comics.

Life and Death of Toyo Harada #1 (Valiant) – Toyo Harada is one of the best characters in comics so we’re excited he’s getting a series. Is he a villain? Is he a hero? Is he somewhere in between? We can’t wait to see where this goes.

Spider-Man: City at War #1 (Marvel) – Based on the popular video game, Marvel launches a new universe in comics and we’re getting flashbacks to the “Ultimate” years and that’s completely ok.

Spider-Man: Life Story #1 (Marvel) – Chip Zdarksy and Mark Bagley are exploring Peter Parker’s life one decade at a time. This kicks off in the 60s just four years after being bitten. Think a condensed version of this is your life.

She Could Fly Soars Into Shops in April 2019 with a Sequel

Dark Horse and Berger Books have revealed art from She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot, the sequel to the acclaimed series She Could Fly, by Christopher Cantwell, co-creator/showrunner of AMC’s Halt and Catch Fire series, and Martín Morazzo! Cantwell and Morazzo are joined by colorist Miroslav Mrva and letterer Clem Robins.

In She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot, Luna has crash-landed back into her life after spending a year in a mental institution… but that might just mean she’s closer to the edge than she’s ever been before. After discovering clues about the Flying Woman’s missing family, Luna’s obsession reignites, threatening to unravel her fragile mind again. Meanwhile, a mysterious guru appears in the sewers of Chicago, a Russian mercenary seeks old secret technology, and the specter of violence begins to loom over everyone once more. Luna starts to wonder… will she even survive long enough to go insane?

She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot #1 goes on sale April 10, 2019. On March 13, 2019, fans can purchase the deluxe trade paperback of the first miniseries, She Could Fly.

She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot #1
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