Tag Archives: benjamin percy

Nuclear Family banner ad

Review: Wolverine #10

Wolverine #10

Wolverine #10 starts out like an action movie with Benjamin Percy, Adam Kubert, and Frank Martin channeling that black ops Team X killing machine energy that the folks who made X-Men Origins: Wolverine tried and failed at. Maverick gets to shoot, fight, and kill his way out of being mind-controlled with Wolverine trying to get him to find healing in Krakoa. However, unlike Wolverine who basically has a whole family (Found, cloned, blood, and otherwise) waiting for him on the island, Maverick doesn’t have friends: just co-workers and employers. That’s the tragedy at the heart of the relationship between Maverick and Wolverine. Logan wants to move on while Maverick wants to continue to re-live the past glories of his Team X days and wander around with guns and a mask taking out baddies for the highest bidder even if he no longer has his mutant powers.

Adam Kubert has been drawing Wolverine for over 27 years, but his work on Wolverine #10 shows that he still enjoys drawing Logan’s berserker rage and the nobility buried underneath. (Full disclosure, he’s my favorite Wolverine artist along with John Romita Jr. You gotta love second generation comics pros.) Kubert also has some damn good storytelling chops, especially in his approach to layouts. He uses white space to simulate Maverick coming out of his mindwipe as well as gaps in his memory. At the beginning of the comic, Kubert uses close-ups and different angles on the same stand-off to show Maverick starting to fill in the details with the help of Wolverine. The next page uses more straighforward panel choices while keeping the blanks, and by the time the Merchant grazes Maverick with Frank Castle’s pistol, we’re back in double page spread mode with insets showing these former Team X members doing what they do best while colorist Frank Martin turns on the red.

Wolverine #10 features quite a few of these compositions from Kubert, namely, a double page spread freezing a moment in time while the story progresses through small grids or inset panels. This is also happening while Martin sets the general tone of the page with his color choices from sleazy neons for the port of Madripoor to *fittingly* black for the Mercs and finally light greens for Krakoa. Frank Martin uses darker greens for the inset panels to drive home that Maverick is really hostile and skeptical about Krakoa even if it means rest and the restoration of his considerable abilities. These color choices along with the insets give you the key story information about the sequence while the rest of the spread adds context and atmosphere. They also show how Maverick is still boxed into his past as a merc and is cool with taking money from the CIA (Who tried to kill him earlier) even while he chides and quips at Wolverine for being a cult leader and Kool-Aid drinker. He’s definitely the kind of guy who says “sell-out” unironically.

Wolverine #10
Dudes rock…

Between the chases, killings, and tough guy one-liners, Benjamin Percy and Adam Kubert continue to explore nostalgia in Wolverine #10. Kubert is an interesting artist choice because he worked with Larry Hama and other on the Wolverine and Weapon X comics in the 1990s that the past two or three issues have been trying to evoke with the Madripoor setting, Team X (Especially Maverick’s mask.), and even the short, yet sweet return of “Patch”. Also, the plot of the comic revolves around an auction of basically Easter Eggs from the Marvel Universe like the grave stone from “Kraven’s Last Hunt”, and Maverick, Wolverine, and the Mercs end up going on a mission to a warehouse with these items. However, Wolverine realizes the emptiness of nostalgia and doesn’t even look at what’s in the “Team X” before torching them. Percy shows where Logan is at as a character while also commenting on creators who yearn to re-tell the stories of their youth instead of breaking new ground.

Basically, there have been enough Wolverine flashback/origin stories, and it’s time to put him in new context or remix these previous stories like he and Kubert are doing with Maverick as they focus on the psychological dimensions of the relationship between them. There was that great flashback sequence in Wolverine #9, and now in this issue, Percy and Kubert show the sad reality of Logan and Maverick’s friendship as they’re perfectly in-sync when fighting CIA agents or various goons, but talk past each other once they get a quiet moment on the helicopter or overlooking Krakoa. Logan and Maverick are like (ultraviolent) work buddies, who really gel professionally, successfully complete projects together, and even throw a few brews back at the happy hour, but don’t really work out of that context. So, Maverick’s actions on the last couple pages of Wolverine #10 hurt like hell, but they do make sense. They might stand back to back on the cover, but these are men heading in polar opposite directions with Logan having both family and national responsibilities. Also, the blank panels come back hinting at Maverick resigning himself to just being a weapon again instead of trying to restart his life in Krakoa as Adam Kubert wrings emotions out of just white on the page.

Benjamin Percy, Adam Kubert, and Frank Martin balance black ops action and the complicated relationship dynamic between Logan and Maverick in Wolverine #10. It also features breathtaking layouts from Kubert and smart color choices from Martin and has nods to the 1990s era of X-comics while adding a little substance to those books’ style.

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Adam Kubert
Colors: Frank Martin Letters: Cory Petit
Story: 7.8 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Devil’s Highway #4

Devil's Highway #4

Though we are in a pandemic, the world does not stop. How we entertain ourselves is probably the one industry where we have a plethora of choices from our home. Some season premieres of different television shows have been delayed and others have been pushed to next year. This has made way to explore and check out some new television shows, which as it was before COVID-19 been hit or miss. One of those shows is Big Sky, which deals with a sex trafficking ring in the Northwest.

The show has a few familiar faces but largely dives into an issue that has never really been addressed in television. The premise shows just how insidious something like this can be and how it can hide in plain sight. As it brings to light just how appearances alone are never a good indicator of one’s behavior. In Devil’s Highway #4, Shannon finds out just how deep this network really is.

We are taken back to Minneapolis, where Shannon is interrogating the man who had her handcuffed about his knowledge of the network, Quentin as we soon find out he was a law enforcement official who eventually got way into deep. As we find out that it had been going since 2009, and a weird Occultist group has been engaging in this sadistic ritual, and it’s tied to something even more menacing. AS she eventually ropes Quentin into taking her to one of the offloading sites, an adventure neither of them may survive. By the issue’s end, Shannon and Quentin track down one of the pimps connected to the ring, where she gets more answers.

Overall, Devil’s Highway #4 is a great penultimate issue where we see a hero rise. The story by Benjamin Percy is astounding. The art by the creative team is astounding. Altogether, a great chapter in the miniseries which ratchets up the action.

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Brent Schoonover and Lee Loughridge,
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

AWA Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleTFAW

Carnage is Unleashed on Peach Momoko’s Carnage: Black, White, & Blood #1 Cover

Recently announced as a member of the inaugural class of Marvel’s Stormbreakers, superstar artist Peach Momoko continues to turn out bestselling variant covers for Marvel’s hottest titles. Fans can now see her latest creation, featuring a depiction of Spider-Man’s scariest foe reimagined in Momoko’s trademark style, for Carnage: Black, White, & Blood #1.

Featuring all-star creators such as Donny Cates, Ken Lashley, Sara Pichelli, Benjamin Percy, Tini Howard, and more, Carnage: Black, White, & Blood will present Carnage’s most spine-chilling tales in BLACK, WHITE, AND BLOOD. See Momoko’s cover below and don’t miss adding this latest variant cover masterpiece to your collection when Carnage: Black, White, & Blood #1 hits stands in March.

CARNAGE: BLACK, WHITE, AND BLOOD #1 Peach Momoko variant cover

Patrick Gleason Delivers a Mesmerizing Variant Cover for Carnage: Black, White, & Blood #1

In the same vein as his iconic Amazing Spider-Man #55 cover, Marvel Stormbreaker Patrick Gleason delivers another stunning cover for the debut issue of Carnage: Black, White, & Blood and Cletus Kasady has never looked more frightening. These striking illustrations have become a major hit with fans, selling out at comic shops across the country.

Featuring all-star creators such as Donny Cates, Ken Lashley, Sara Pichelli, Benjamin Percy, Tini Howard, and more, Carnage: Black, White, & Blood will feature Carnage’s most spine-chilling tales presented in BLACK, WHITE, AND BLOOD. See Cletus Kasady cackle at the horror he’s about to unleash on Gleason’s cover below and don’t miss adding this extraordinary cover to your collection when Carnage: Black, White, & Blood #1 hits stands in March.

CARNAGE: BLACK, WHITE, AND BLOOD #1 Patrick Gleason cover

Review: Devil’s Highway #3

DEVIL’S HIGHWAY #3

One of my favorite directors of all time is Quentin Tarantino. His body of work transcends most other filmmakers, as each film is homage to a genre. He is also one of the few directors that draws from the films of 1970s. As each of his movies are both connected and an animal all its own.

As one of my favorite movies of his is Kill Bill Volumes 1 &2. AS they were two separate movies but told one connected narrative. As every time we felt our hero in peril, she always found a way out. In the third Devil’s Highway #3 Shannon gets in a pickle and eventually fights her way out.

We’re taken to Northern Illinois where the same young woman that was abducted awakes to a pine box only to see her captor smiling back as she is helpless to escape. Shannon is in Minneapolis trying to find clues as to who killed her father. That leads her to a strip club where she meets an FBI agent who gives her the agency’s file on the network. Her trail leads to an exotic pet dealer who tries to kill her. By the issue’s end, Shannon ends up handcuffed, but soon finds a way to escape and makes her captor give her information about the network

Overall, Devil’s Highway #3 is a great issue that feels exactly like a grindhouse movie. The story by Benajmin Percy is amazing. The art by the creative team is astonishing. Altogether, Devil’s Highway #3 is an action-packed issue that adds more than a few dollops of danger.

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Brent Schoonover and Lee Loughridge
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

AWA Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Review: Devil’s Highway #2

Devil's Highway #2

One of the most underrated movies of the 1990s was In Too Deep. It starred Omar Epps and a still new to acting, Todd Smith AKA LL Cool J, in what started out as a procedural drama and turned into a tense thriller. Epps played an undercover cop that goes into the underbelly of Cincinatti’s drug ring. Smith, in a role which he actually shined in, played a ruthless drug kingpin.

As the movie shows just how embedded one can get when pretending to be somebody else. As Epps investigation gets him to the top of the organization, unearthing a treacherous network. AS the mindset one has to deal with on that level, tests the moral compass of even strongest. In Devil’s Highway #2 Shannon gets in deeper, but not without consequences.

We are taken to Scott County, Minnesota, where a young woman who works as a street walker, gets an unexpected surprise, one that may be fatal. WE find Shannon getting an early Xmas present, and from someone she assumes is harmless, when simultaneously there is a call for a found dead body on the scanner. Shannon thinks something is fishy, and her research leads her to find out that there is an intricate network of sex traffickers. By issue’s end, Shannon , is getting closer to the truth of what happened to these women and her father.

Overall, Devil’s Highway #2 is a great second issue that is relevant and exciting. The story by Benjamin Percy is wonderful. The art by Brent Schoonover and Lee Loughridge is wonderful. Altogether, it’s a great entry in the series that puts a spotlight on a very relevant issue.

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Brent Schoonover and Lee Loughridge
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

AWA Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon KindleZeus Comics

Review: Wolverine #8

Wolverine #8

Wolverine #8 celebrates 350 issues of Wolverine in solo adventures and for such a big number, the issue is rather… normal. Marvel has apparently decided to play things a bit conservative with an issue that’s pretty much a normal issue. There’s not a bunch of guest creators doing short stories or celebrating creators of the past. Instead, Wolverine #8 is a solid jumping-on point for those who haven’t been reading the series and want to check it out.

Writer Benjamin Percy, artist Adam Kubert, and colorist Antonio Fabela kick things off with a story featuring Wolverine and CIA operative Jeff Bannister. “War Stories” features the two soldiers sharing some of the scars they carry with them. It’s a solid opening and sets up things down the road but an entire issue of just this could have been an amazing anniversary issue.

There’s some real emotion and pain danced around with the opening and a full issue could have really delivered an amazing end to the year. The idea of these two soldiers sharing their pain and haunted past could make for a very interesting read. Mix it in with the very real world issue of PTSD in our soldiers and there’s potential magic. This would have been a very interesting way to “celebrate” 350 issues.

Wolverine #8‘s main story, also written by Percy, is a bit more traditional as Wolverine is tasked to continue the battle against Xeno and others attacking various facilities. In this case, the path leads him back to his Team X partner Maverick, a character whose use over the years has been rather mixed. It’s a pretty standard story but it at least delivers a jumping-on point for new readers. Most is explained and done well enough that you don’t feel like you’re missing anything.

Percy is joined by artist Viktor Bogdanovic and colorist Matthew Wilson. Along with letterer Cory Petit, the art is solid though feels a bit reserved in some ways. This isn’t a story with flashy splash pages or really panel breaking layouts. The panels are mostly boxes and the images are kept within. It’s an odd artistic choice in that the art looks good but it’s also not splashy.

For an anniversary issue, Wolverine #8 feels pretty average as far as issues. It’s a good issue and a good starting point for readers but this isn’t one that really celebrates anything. It seems to do that by just telling a solid and entertaining story.

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Adam Kubert, Viktor Bogdanovic
Color: Antonio Fabela, Matthew Wilson Letterer/Production: Cory Petit Design: Tom Muller
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.1 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

After Dawn of X Comes Reign of X

This week delivers the conclusion of X of Swords, the sprawling crossover that represented the latest chapter in Jonathan Hickman’s grand vision for the X-Men, and learned that the Reign of X was upon us!

Hickman’s bold take on mutantkind began last year in the critically-acclaimed House of and Powers of X and continued in the Dawn of X, ushering in a slate of brand-new X-Men titles that took the comic book industry by storm. Now, the saga continues in Reign of X, a new era encompassing the upcoming story arcs in all your favorite X-titles. The Reign of X will see the forming of new teams, the return of major characters, new threats brought about by classic villains, and more game-changing revelations that will alter the X-Men mythos forever! Check out what’s to come in a mesmerizing teaser image by superstar X-Men artist Mahmud Asrar!

It all begins in December as the X-Men deal with the fallout of X of Swords and look to the future. Here’s what’s to come next month:

Hellions #7 by writer Zeb Wells and artist Stephen Segovia will explore the aftermath of the team’s brutal massacre in X of Swords.

Writer Leah Williams and artist David Baldeon continue to investigate mutant deaths and explore the complexities that come with resurrection in X-Factor #5.

Kate Pryde and Emma Frost finally enact their long-awaited revenge on Sebastian Shaw in Marauders #16 by writer Gerry Duggan and artist Stefano Caselli.

Mutantkind sets their sights on the galaxy and beyond in writer Al Ewing and artist Valerio Schiti’s groundbreaking S.W.O.R.D. #1.

An old foe rises in New Mutants #14, the beginning of a wild new era for your favorite young mutants by writer Vita Ayala and artist Rod Reis.

Wolverine reunites with Maverick and Team X in Wolverine #8, a special over-sized milestone issue written by Benjamin Percy with art by Adam Kubert and Viktor Bogdanovic.

The search for Captain Britain is underway as Excalibur returns to Otherworld in Excalibur #16 by writer Tini Howard and artist Marcus To.

X-Force will stop at nothing to protect Krakoa, even if it means interrogating their own, in the action-packed X-Force #15 by writer Benjamin Percy and Marvel’s Stormbreaker artist Joshua Cassara.

And Cyclops makes a fateful decision regarding the future of the X-Men in X-Men #16, written by Jonathan Hickman with art by Phil Noto.

Reign of X
« Older Entries