Tag Archives: benjamin percy

SDCC 2019: It’s the Dawn of X with X-Men, Excalibur, Marauders, New Mutants, Fallen Angels, and X-Force

With just days until House of X #1 hits store shelves, Marvel announced six brand-new ongoing series with a suite of all-star creative teams to take mutantkind further than they’ve ever gone before, kicking off with X-Men, Excalibur, Marauders, New Mutants, Fallen Angels, and X-Force!

Announced at Marvel’s Next Big Thing panel at San Diego Comic-Con, these new series will build directly from the universe-shifting events of House of X and Powers of X.

These new series will kick off the first phase of Jonathan Hickman’s massive multi-year plan for the X-Men, redefining everything the world knows about mutants and their place in the universe. As the perfect jumping on point for new and long-time X-Men fans, these extraordinary series will change everything – with only more to come in the months and years ahead…

And this is only the beginning. The Dawn of X will begin this October!

X-MEN #1

Written by JONATHAN HICKMAN
Penciled by LEINIL FRANCIS YU
Cover by LEINIL FRANCIS YU

A NEW ERA DAWNS FOR THE X-MEN!

The X-Men find themselves in a whole new world of possibility… and things have never been better! Jonathan Hickman (HOUSE OF X, POWERS OF X, SECRET WARS) and superstar artist Leinil Yu (NEW AVENGERS, CAPTAIN AMERICA) reveal the saga of Cyclops and his hand-picked squad of mutant powerhouses!

On sale October 2019

EXCALIBUR #1

Written by TINI HOWARD
Penciled by MARCUS TO
Cover by MAHMUD ASRAR
On sale October 2019

A NEW DAY IS FORGED!

Mutantkind has always been special…as has their relationship with the world—or WORLDS—around them. As this new era dawns, a new connection forms between mutants and the magic of the world… and that of Otherworld! Can the new Captain Britain forge a new way through the chaos with her companions Rogue, Gambit, Jubilee, Rictor…and Apocalypse?!?

MARAUDERS #1

Written by GERRY DUGGAN
Penciled by MATTEO LOLLI
Cover by RUSSELL DAUTERMAN
On sale October 2019

THE X-MEN SAIL AT DAWN!

Even in this glorious new dawn, Mutantkind faces hardships and oppression from their human counterparts. Led by Captain Kate Pryde and funded by Emma Frost and the Hellfire Trading Company, Marauders Storm, Pyro, Bishop and Iceman sail the seas of the world to protect those hated and feared!

NEW MUTANTS #1

Issue 1 Written by JONATHAN HICKMAN & ED BRISSON
Issue 2 Written by JONATHAN HICKMAN
Penciled by ROD REIS
Cover by ROD REIS
On sale November 2019

THE NEXT GENERATION CLAIMS THE FUTURE!

The classic New Mutants (Sunspot, Wolfsbane, Mirage, Karma, Magik, and Cypher) get together with a few new friends (Chamber, Mondo) to seek out their missing member and share the good news… a mission that takes them into space alongside the Starjammers!

FALLEN ANGELS #1

Written by BRYAN EDWARD HILL
Penciled by SZYMON KUDRANSKI
Cover by ASHLEY WITTER
On sale November 2019

NOT ALL BELONG IN PARADISE!

Psylocke finds herself in this new world of Mutantkind unsure of her place in it… but when a face from her past returns only to be killed, she seeks help from others who feel similar to get vengeance. Cable and X-23 join Kwannon for a personal mission that could jeopardize all Mutantkind!

X-FORCE #1

Written by BENJAMIN PERCY
Penciled by JOSHUA CASSARA
Cover by DUSTIN WEAVER
On sale November 2019

THE COST OF THE FUTURE ISN’T CHEAP.

X-Force is the CIA of the mutant world—one half intelligence branch, one half special ops. Beast, Jean Grey and Sage on one side, Wolverine, Kid Omega and Domino on the other. In a perfect world, there would be no need for an X-Force. We’re not there… yet.

Preview: James Bond: Blackbox

James Bond: Blackbox TP

writer: Benjamin Percy
artists: Rapha Lobosco
cover: Dominic Reardon
FC | 160 pages | Action/Adventure | $19.99 | Teen+

COLLECTING ISSUES 1-6

In the snowbound French Alps, James Bond finds himself in the crosshairs of an assassin who targets other assassins. This is the first puzzle piece in a larger adrenaline-fueled mystery that will send Bond across the globe to infiltrate the underworld, risk everything in high-stakes casino gambling, evade deadly pursuers, and root out a digital breach threatening global security.

James Bond: Blackbox TP

Preview: Full Bleed, Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation

Full Bleed, Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation

Gavin Edwards, Tini Howard, Joe Lansdale, Josh O’Neill, Hannah Means-Shannon, Philip Kennedy Johnson, Adam Knave, Vivek Tiwary, Russell Sheath, Abdulkareem Baba Aminu, Kat Kruger, Jon Raymond, Benjamin Percy, and many more (w) • Roger Langridge, Peter Bagge, Sara Richard, Julia Alekseyeva, Jen Vaughn, Noah Van Sciver, Danica Brine, Gideon Kendall, Tony Shasteen, Steve Beach, Brent Schoonover, Shannon Wheeler and many more (a) • Michael Brophy (c)

The World’s ONLY 200-page print-only hardcover magazine is back with Volume 3, and this is the best one yet! Welcome to HEAVY ROTATION.

Here’s just the beginning: Rolling Stone’s Gavin Edwards chimes in with a lost and unpublished Grant Morrison interview (that is absolutely bonkers), The Fifth Beatle’s Vivek Tiwary pens an essay on the 50th anniversary of Yellow Submarine, Hannah Means-Shannon from Metallica and Scott Ian of Anthrax on their long friendship, and shared love of horror and all things geek.

New comics from Roger Langridge, Josh O’Neill & Gideon Kendall, Adam Knave & Andrew Losq, Kat Kruger & Jen Vaughn, Noah Van Sciver, Julia Alekseyeva, and more! New fiction from Joe Lansdale! New essays from Tini Howard, Abdulkareem Baba Aminu, Jarrett Melendez, Jon Raymond and more!

And we’re just getting started. Like the first two volumes, FULL BLEED, Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation has a surprise in store on every page.

FULL BLEED, Vol. 1 was a smash hit, and it’s… sold out! But did you miss out on FULL BLEED, Vol. 2? It’s still available below!

HC • FC • $25.99 • 200 pages • 8-1/2” x 11” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-532-6

Full Bleed, Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation

Exclusive: Check Out Geof Darrow’s Original Art for the Next Two Volumes of Full Bleed

IDW Published is currently running a Kickstarter for Full Bleed Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation which runs until January 10.

The print only hardcover magazine features a long-lost interview with bestselling comic book writer Grant Morrison, discussing his feud with writer Alan Moore; a conversation between music legends Metallica’s Kirk Hammett and Anthrax’s Scott Ian; interviews with with comic book legend Geof Darrow, and contributions by Julia Alekseyeva, Abdulkareem Baba Aminu, Peter Bagge, Tini Howard, Gideon Kendall, Roger Langridge, Joe Lansdale, Erin Nations, Benjamin Percy, Jon Raymond, Sara Richard, Vivek J. Tiwary, Noah Van Sciver; Shannon Wheeler, and many more.

On top of some impressive entertainment, this is your chance to own original art of Geof Darrow‘s.

The Geof Darrow Original Art Tier nets you Signed & Numbered Limited Versions of the next 2 volumes of Full Bleed: The Comics & Culture Quarterly, along with signed limited prints for those two volumes (Artists TBD) along with slipcase for all FOUR volumes. Plus a free copy of Las Vegas Repo #2! Plus an enamel Full Bleed “Sphere” pin (3rd in the series).. AND get your name in the next volume of Full Bleed ! Along with one piece of completely ORIGINAL ART by the legendary Geof Darrow!

We’ve got an exclusive first look at the original art by Darrow.

The Kickstarter runs until January 10 and Full Bleed Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation features:

  • The Grant Morrison Interview, Part One, By Gavin Edwards, illustration by Peter Bagge
  • Monsters of Rock: An interview with Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, and Anthrax’s Scott Ian, concerning their shared history and love of all things horror and genre, By Russell Sheath, illustration by Tony Shasteen
  • We Don’t All Live in a Yellow Submarine: An Essay, By Vivek J. Tiwary
  • The Watering Shed: A brand-new short story featuring Hap & Leonard, By award-winning novelist Joe Lansdale
  • Lover’s Eyes: An Essay, By Tini Howard, with illustrations by Sara Richard
  • Arizona Daisy: A new comic, By Roger Langridge
  • May 1968: The Revolution that Almost Was – A comic essay, By Julia Alekseyeva
  • Black’s In: When a “Blackout” is a Good Thing, Text and illustrations by Abdulkareem Baba Aminu
  • Following the Bloody Trail of the Shaolin Cowboy: An interview with Geof Darrow, featuring never-before-seen art, by Hannah Means-Shannon
  • The Underdream: A new comic, By Josh O’Neill and Gideon Kendall
  • The Lost Boys of the U-Boat Bremen: Chapter Three, By Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Steve Beach
  • Down Mexico Way: A travel log, By Jarrett Melendez, with illustration from Danica Brine
  • Uncharted Part Two: A short story, By Benjamin Percy with spot illustrations by Brent Schoonover
  • The Shapes: A new comic, By Adam Knave & Andrew Losq
  • New short comics from Shannon Wheeler, Jennifer Hayden and Noah Van Sciver
  • A personal tale of young love gone wrong, By award-winning novelist and screenwriter, Jon Raymond
  • The Big Smoke, a photo essay, By Joel Meadows
  • Blade Runner: Technology Steals the Soul — An essay, By Tom Waltz, with illustration by Santipérez
  • The Five Most Important Underground Cartoonists, an essay, By Bob Levin
  • Home: A new comic by Erin Nations

Review: Wolverine: The Long Night #1

Wolverine: The Long Night #1

Following a string of mysterious deaths in Burns, Alaska, Special Agents Sally Pierce and Tad Marshall arrive to investigate. They soon find there’s more going on than meets the eye… 

Based on the podcast of the same name, this new mini-series is actually really solid. Written by Benjamin Percy, who also scripted the podcast, the first issue focuses not on Wolverine but instead two FBI agents trying to figure out who murdered a fishing crew and two women. Wolverine: The Long Night #1 feels more like the X-Files than it does a Wolverine story. And that’s not a bad thing.

Percy creates an amazing set-up and setting that just adds to the mystery. The locations, the characters, everything is perfectly thought out to enhance the story. The first issue feels like every detail is thought out not just in the story but in the art as well.

Marcio Takara with Matt Mill on color and lettering by Joe Caramagna handle the art duties. This is a great example of where the art and the story match perfectly. Takara’s style with Mill’s color creates a dreary mood to the comic that screams murder mystery. Percy’s story setting is brought to life in a way that just enhances the mood of the comic.

This is a solid murder mystery read that so far just happens to have Wolverine involved. I’ve never listened to the podcast but after reading this first issue I’m tempted to give it a shot. This is a great set up to the story and again it feels more like a police procedural than anything else. If that sort of story appeals to you, this is a comic that’s a must get.

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Marcio Takara
Color: Matt Milla Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? Sound off in the comments! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Beat – DC’s Adding More Titles to Their Walmart Comics Offering – Must be doing well.

CBR – Benjamin Percy Announces Departure from DC’s Nightwing – That’s a shame.

The Beat – Roz Chast is the first woman to be inducted into the Harvey Award Hall of Fame – About time and congrats it’s well deserved!

 

Reviews

Talking Comics – Batman #54

Talking Comics – Bully Wars #1

Comic Attack – The Dreaming #1

The Beat – Garlandia

Review: Nightwing #44: Working out on Chest and (throw) Back Day

*Mild spoiler whited out at the end*

I came to read this really interesting comic — Nightwing #44 “The Bleeding Edge” part one because everyone’s favorite comics PR guy Clark Bull tweeted:

Now, I tend to choose which superhero comics to read based on the writer and artist working on them rather than because of the particular characters in it. A great creative team can make anything work, yes even Deathstroke. I was previously unfamiliar with Christopher Mooneyham (pencils) and Benjamin Percy (writer), Nick Filardi (colors) and Carlos M. Mangual (letters). But as a critic who analyzes art through a feminist and queer lens I’ve developed an academic interest in Dick Grayson.

Grayson is one of the only male characters that straight male creative teams have frequently offered up to the androphilic gaze. In layperson’s terms– Nightwing is a rare character that even straight men deliberately depict with the intent to make readers find him sexy and that many readers who are attracted to men see as sexy, even before the creators came around to the idea. Meanwhile, almost every female character is drawn to appeal to the male gaze, even lesbian characters. I, as a queer person, might find some of those female characters hot too– but that is a side effect, they were not depicted with my gaze in mind.

Nightwing exists in a critically interesting space for these reasons. And if Clark tells me to watch for Discowing worthy visual tributes in Nightwing #44, sure I’ll check it out.

What I found was a comic full of early 80s visual cues– everything from John Romita Jr-esque squared-off lips and Klaus Jansen/Frank Miller gritty but pretty action filled pencils to subways with 1980’s level graphitti. Even Dick’s haircut is early 80’s compliant, and flattering (see 50% of Duran Duran).

And what is this utterly Bronze Age Nightwing doing? He’s complaining about our modern relationship with the portable internet. Which is seems in-character. He’s also using his newly modified escrima sticks exactly like Daredevil uses his batton, ricocheting it around the subway car. It even has a break in the center for grappling hook use, like Murdock’s primary mode of transportation.

Was there a rift in the multiverse through which a dimension-hopping Dick got to replicate Matt Murdock’s batton? Were Grayson’s escrima sticks always like that and I just never noticed before because the art wasn’t so similar to what I associate with my favorite old Daredevil comics? I’d never connected Daredevil and Nightwing till now despite their shared acrobatic skills and handsome figures. But maybe the brooding and emotionally damaged Matt Murdock– the Worst Boyfriend in Comics™– isn’t so different after all from the joyful and emotionally intelligent Dick Grayson — the Best Ex-Boyfriend in Comics.

Halfway into the issue we are greeted with a shirtless and unshorn Dick Grayson stretched out on the coach. I appreciate the unshorn which is especially realistic if we’re doing an 80s throwback aesthetic. His body language is open as we look down on him from above.

You know what? We deserve artist Chris Mooneyham’s Dick Grayson lying shirtless on a couch. The recognition that men can be the subject of our sexual desires and that people might want to look at them being sexy is still a pretty radical proposition in superhero comics. It was part of the recent Grayson series’ success and it is actually part of the story here.

Unlike many of the random semi nude women in comics it makes sense for Dick to be shirtless. He’s at home relaxing in a bright window while flirting with his on again off again. Grayson’s anatomy while rare, is within the range of things a body can be.  And that’s good. Physically impossible figures are honestly not sexy to me. He doesn’t have the dead-eyed objectivized look we often see on shirtless women when drawn by men. He’s clearly in thought here. Look, I like semi clothed women as much as the next person who’s sexualy attracted to women. But it shouldn’t always be women. That’s not a balanced diet and its hurting storytelling.

This art is a helpful reminder that sexy art is best served by being character driven, by having a torso that accommodates lungs and a gastrointestinal system, non-fictional muscles, and even has body hair (women have body hair too, I know this may be shocking to some men who’ve never been naked with a woman IRL). I’m not suggesting that a character needs to look like Dick does here in order to be sexy. I want to see all sorts of bodies and genders represented on the page, especially the acknowledgement that bodies that deviate from Hollywood norms are desirable too. Why are no characters drawn like Katie King or Ximena Santos from Raven the Pirate Princess in the DCU or Marvel?

Anyway….

Dick’s legendary chemistry with Barbara Gordon is in full display here — the juxtaposed panels of their phone conversation establish a visual flirtation between the two characters. They may be in different apartments talking on the phone but their eye lines across the gutters keep them flirting even more than their dialog does.

One thing I could do without is the heavy deli owner being drawn as a slob. It’s an anti-fat stereotype and below this comic’s intelligence.

Mild spoiler (highlight the text)

In the end, as with many great things of the 1980s, this story ends in body horror. I won’t say how. As a huge fan of the works of David Cronenberg I say hooray!

In conclusion Nightwing #44’s virtues include:

  • Early 1980s Daredevil aesthetics
  • Shirtless Dick Grayson drawn just for you and me
  • A villain who uses technology in creative ways
  • Light social commentary
  • An easy jumping on point for new readers of the series, like me

That’s good promise from just a single issue of a new character arc in an existing series. Sure, I’ll keep checking out Nightwing– literally and figuratively. You should too! We deserve it.PS: For an extremely thoughtful and historically centered look at the way Dick Grayson has been depicted in comics read the essential Meg Downey’s essay In Defense of Dick Grayson: Objectification, Sexuality, and Subtext.

C2E2: Interview with Nightwing Writer Benjamin Percy

Benjamin Percy is a multitalented writer, who excels in a variety of mediums. He has written four novels, a book about creative writing called Thrill Me: Essays on Fiction, was a contributing editor for Esquire and taught at the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop. Along with screenplays and short stories, Percy has written quite a few comic books since 2014, including DC Rebirth’s Green Arrow and Teen Titans. His next project is a run on Nightwing, beginning with issue 44, and I had the opportunity to chat with him about Dick Grayson’s role in the DC Universe and Bludhaven, collaborating with artist Chris Mooneyham, and of course, Dick’s most famous asset…

Graphic Policy: I first saw your name in print in a review of Michael Chabon’s Telegraph Avenue (2012) for Esquire. I was wondering how your work as a critic and arts writer influenced your work as a writer of superhero comics.

Benjamin Percy: I write novels. I write for magazines. I write comics. I write screenplays. I write essays. And let’s not forget the erotica too, which I’m celebrated for. What I love about writing in different mediums is I’m always challenging myself aesthetically. So, I’m writing comics and learning things from the medium that make me a better novelist. I’m serving as a book critic or a film critic and as a result, I’m looking more sharply at my own work and holding myself to the same standards as these artists I’m putting on the chopping block.

In every single case as I leap from genre to genre, I’m not only keeping myself excited at the keyboard because it’s always fresh. I’m also hopefully becoming a better storyteller.

GP: One thing I enjoyed about your Green Arrow run was that you returned the character to his Bronze Age roots as a “social justice warrior”. What social issues do you plan to explore in Nightwing?

BP: I was part of the Rebirth era of Green Arrow and that meant looking to his legacy and recognizing that in the O’Neil/Adams era, he was a hotheaded liberal. That’s something that had fallen away from the series. I brought that back, and I channeled the zeitgeist. I was making direct reference to the headlines on the page. There were storylines that resembled what was going on at Standing Rock and the Dakota Access Pipeline. There were stories that bore some resemblance to what was going on with Black Lives Matter.

This is Nightwing. I’m not taking the same approach. But I am thinking about what makes us anxious right now. I think that’s something that comics do very well. They channel cultural unease. They give you a cracked mirror version of reality. There’s a lot of things we should fear right now. Cybercrime is chief among them.

If you look at what’s happened with Cambridge Analytica. If you looked at what happened with the election results and the possibility of Russian meddling. If you think about how many times a day you turn your face towards a screen, maybe you think about how every time you tap a mouse or swipe your hand across a tablet or click a link that’s feeding into an algorithm that’s following you and profiling you. If you think about how every time your computer makes that carpenter ant sound, or every time your phone glitches, you’re wondering, “Has it already begun? Is a Trojan worming its way through the guts of my hard drive?”

I want to realize those fears on the page. I think it’s especially apt for Nightwing to be taking on these threats.

GP: Why is he the perfect fit?

BP: For a few different reasons. One, I wouldn’t say that Nightwing is a Luddite, but unlike Batman and Batgirl, he doesn’t surround himself with a lot of gadgets. He’s got his batons, and he’s got his acrobatics. I love an antagonist that really challenges a hero. Nightwing is facing a villain he can’t punch.

Nightwing is also interestingly situated in this storyline because he’s incredibly vital to the whole DCU and adaptable. He knows everyone. He’s served as a follower, and he’s served as a leader. He has connections to the Teen Titans and the Titans and the Justice League and the Bat-group. If you think about vulnerable data as being one of the greatest weapons of this time, he is a vault of vulnerable data. If he’s compromised, everyone’s compromised.

So, he’s facing the the dark web, but he’s at the center of his own web, which makes him the perfect person to take on this challenge and the most worrisome person to fail.

GP: Yeah, he’s definitely the heart of the DC Universe. So, one thing I liked about Tim Seeley and Sam Humphries’ runs on Nightwing were that they brought Bludhaven back with its own personality and history. How do you plan to build off this in your own run?

BP: I want to give props to Tim and Sam who did a kick ass job. I also love what Tom [King] was doing with Spyral in his Grayson run. Right now, Bill Gates is funneling 80 million dollars into a plot of land in Arizona to create a smart city. Right now, off the shore of China, they’re building islands. They’re expanding their country and building these “smart islands”.

I’m taking this real world situation and putting it in Bludhaven, a city that has always been in need of rehab. So, a tech mogul has moved there and is trying to rehabilitate the place. Something else might be going on beneath the surface of his intentions. Not only are buildings being demolished and neighborhoods rebuilt within a 5G network, but every address in Bludhaven has a package arrive on their doorstep. Inside that package is a device known as the “Phantasm”. This Phantasm device is a VR unit that bears some resemblance to Alexa, and Alexa, as you know, is always listening.

GP: She’s so scary. I’m never getting one.

BP: I’m taking Bludhaven, and how it’s been established as a city of ruins, a city of scandal, a city that has seen better times. I’m applying to it the same sort of thing you’re seeing on the East Coast with gentrification, except this is sort of tech-laced gentrification.

GP: So, one thing I love about reading Nightwing comics is that he has this exuberant, acrobatic type of fighting style. How do you choreograph his fights differently in the scripting process versus Damian Wayne’s in Teen Titans or Oliver Queen in Green Arrow?

BP: There’s a lot less yelling since Damian isn’t involved. Far fewer insults being hurled. I’m thinking carefully about every action setpiece and trying to create staging that takes advantage of his particular skill set. If you look at the first scene in Nightwing #44, there’s a subway sequence that involves his batons and also involves, I won’t exactly say what happens yet, a kind of high wire act.

Right away, in a really dramatic fashion, I’m trying to say, “This is Nightwing” with an exclamation mark.

GP: Kind of like a Bond cold open. Speaking of James Bond, which you wrote a little bit for Dynamite, are you bringing any kind of spy elements to Nightwing?

BP: We’re starting off in Bludhaven, but the story is not staying there. Arc after arc, it’s getting bigger and bigger.

GP: That’s what I like to hear. Chris Mooneyham (Five Ghosts) is the artist on your first storyline. Why was he the perfect choice for Nightwing?

BP: He’s the second coming of David Mazzucchelli. If you look at the first few pages [of Nightwing #44], which have been released, you will see parallels in Batman Year One and Daredevil Born Again in what we’re doing. It’s shadow soaked, neo noir, intricately detailed, and he takes advantage of every centimeter of the panel. There’s a beautiful grit at work, classic staging, and a more mature sensibility.

GP: I have one last question. Dick Grayson is perceived both in the DC Universe and by fans as a sex symbol. How will you portray that in your run on Nightwing?

BP: I make a crack about it right away. On page 2, panel 6, if you look at the top right corner of the subway station, there’s some graffiti that says “Butthaven”. I’m winking right there at how Dick has been portrayed. There will be romance to come, and I’ll also say that Batgirl plays an essential role in this story. He needs someone who is tech savvy. I’ve always loved their relationship.

Nightwing #44 will be released on May 2, 2018.

Follow Benjamin Percy on Twitter.

Preview: Green Arrow #38

Green Arrow #38

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Juan Ferreyra
Cover: Juan Ferreyra Variant: Mike Grell and Lovern Kindzierski
Letterer: Deron Bennett
Editor: Alex Antone Assistant Editor: Dave Wielgosz
In Shops: Mar 07, 2018
SRP: $3.99

“TALE OF TWO CITIES” finale! In a special issue that wraps up plotlines that began at the start of this series, Green Arrow and Black Canary must stop Moira Queen and Merlyn from enacting the final stage of their master plan. And if G.A. manages to defeat them, he’ll still have to face the outcome of a trial that could change Oliver Queen’s life forever!

Preview: Teen Titans #17

Teen Titans #17

Story: Benjamin Percy Art: Scot Eaton Cover: Dan Mora
Ink: Wayne Faucher Color: Jim Charalampiois Letterer: Corey Breen
Group Editor: Brian Cunningham Editor: Alex Antone Associate Editor: Brittany Holzherr
In Shops: Feb 28, 2018
SRP: $3.99

“The Following” part one! In the aftermath of “Super Sons of Tomorrow” the Teen Titans are left without a place to call home. But a Titan’s work is never finished, and when a series of strange murders crop up in San Francisco, it’s up to the team to crack the case and prevent further bloodshed. Are the killings the work of a single serial killer…or is there a greater conspiracy at work?

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