Tag Archives: ann nocenti

Catwoman Celebrates 80 Years with a 100-Page Super Spectacular in April

DC’s feline fatale celebrates an 80th anniversary this year, and that calls for a grand soiree, invite only, attended by some of comics’ top creators! Stock up on both catnip and champagne! 

Since the character first appeared alongside Batman in 1940’s Batman #1, Catwoman has become an icon to millions of comic book fans. The undeniable magnetism between Batman and Catwoman has been one of comics’ most reliable constants: wherever Catwoman goes, Batman is sure to follow, if only to take her down. As deadly as she is beautiful, infamous cat burglar Selina Kyle uses her nine lives to walk the razor’s edge between light and darkness in Gotham City.

On April 15, 2020, DC will celebrate Catwoman’s 80th anniversary with a landmark one-shot, Catwoman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1. Featuring a cover by series writer/artist Joëlle Jones, this must-have tribute comic includes stories by Ed Brubaker, Cameron Stewart, Paul Dini, Ann Nocenti, Adam Hughes, Tom King, Mikel Janín, Mindy Newell, Will Pfeifer, and Emanuela Lupacchino, as well as pinups by Steve Rude, Tula Lotay, Jim Balent, and others.

In a story that expands their monumental run, writer Ed Brubaker and artist Cameron Stewart will reprise their Catwoman collaboration with a new 12-page story, “The Art of Picking a Lock,” that takes place near end of their original dynamic story line that started with iconic storyteller Darwyn Cooke. And no stranger himself to writing dangerous antiheroes, Harley Quinn co-creator Paul Dini debuts a new character for Selina Kyle’s anniversary in a story about an exotic cat taxidermist who intends to add Catwoman to their collection!

Cameron Stewart has teased a bit of his contribution with Ed Brubaker.

In addition to Jones’s dynamic cover, fans and collectors can also look forward to eight variant covers spotlighting Catwoman throughout the decades, drawn by some of comics’ premier artists:

  • 1940s variant cover by Adam Hughes 
  • 1950s variant cover by Travis Charest 
  • 1960s variant cover by J. Scott Campbell 
  • 1970s variant cover by Frank Cho
  • 1980s variant cover by Stanley “Artgerm” Lau
  • 1990s variant cover by Gabriele Dell’Otto 
  • 2000s variant cover by Jim Lee and Scott Williams 
  • 2010s variant cover by Jeehyung Lee

The Catwoman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 is a prestige format comic book retailing for $9.99 and available at local comics retailers and digital retailers on April 15, 2020.

Catwoman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1

Review: X-Men Classic: The Complete Collection Vol. 2

Classic X-Men were reprints of the original X-Men comics… with new material!? These collections collect that new material with some depth as to the history of it all.

X-Men Classic: The Complete Collection Vol. 2 collects Classic X-Men #24-44 and material from Marvel Fanfare #60.

Story: Chris Claremont, Ann Nocenti, Tom Orzechowski, Daryl Edelman, Fabian Nicieza, John Byrne
Art: John Bolton, June Brigman, Mark Bright, Rick Leonardi, Kyle Baker, Jim Lee, Jim Fern, Mike Collins, Kieron Dwyer, Dave Ross, John Byrne
Ink: John Bolton, Ro Richardson, Josef Rubinstein, Bob McLeod, Kyle Baker, Hilary Barta, Terry Austin, Ricardo Villamonte
Color: Glynis Oliver, John Bolton, Christie Scheele, Petra Scotese, Mike Rockwitz, Gregory Wright, Bob Sharen
Letterer: Tom Orzechowski, Joe Rosen, Jim Novak, Bill Oakley, Michael Heisler, Lois Buhalis, John Costanza, Diana Albers

Get your copy in comic shops now and on book shops on December 10! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Ruby Falls’ River Runs Red Again with Ann Nocenti, Flavia Biondi, and Lee Loughridge

From legendary writer Ann Nocenti, extraordinary new talent Flavia Biondi, and acclaimed colorist Lee Loughridge comes Ruby Falls: a neo-noir tale of love, memory, and murder mysteriously woven through three generations of women, and hinging on their individual, intertwined fights for freedom. Ruby Falls, the new four-issue miniseries, is the latest addition to Karen Berger’s critically acclaimed imprint Berger Books at Dark Horse Comics

Ruby Falls is a sleepy town. But sleep brings nightmares, and 20-something Lana is about to wake up in the middle of her hometown’s biggest secret: the “disappearance” of Betty Gallagher, who was infamous for her progressive ways during the mobster-ruled heyday of this old mining town. The dim details of this cold-case murder are trapped in the mind of Lana’s grandmother Clara, who suffers from dementia. When Clara starts to share these deeply-buried, violent memories with her, Lana is hooked. She becomes obsessed with cracking the case, even if it means snapping the minds of everyone involved, splintering the peaceful town— and putting herself in grave danger. 

Ruby Falls is a new kind of noir—a dazzling and unforgettably modern murder mystery with a feminist edge; a story of risk, adventure, passion and trust… until the Ruby Falls river runs red again. The first issue of Ruby Falls goes on sale October 2, 2019.

Ruby Falls

Review: Marvel Comics Presents #1

The classic series is back! Marvel Comics Presents delivers three new stories featuring Wolverine, Namor, and Captain America.

Marvel Comics Presents #1 is by Charles Soule, Paulo Siqueira, Oren Junior, Frank D’Armata, Joe Caramagna, Greg Pak, Tomm Coker, Michael Garland, Ann Nocenti, Greg Land, and Jay Leisten.

Get your copy in comic shops on January 16! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Marvel Comics Presents #1

Marvel Comics Presents #1

(W) Charles Soule, Ann Nocenti, Greg Pak (A) Paulo Siqueira, Tomm Coker, More (CA) Arthur Adams, Federico Blee
Rated T+
In Shops: Jan 16, 2019
SRP: $4.99

THE CLASSIC MARVEL SERIES RETURNS FOR MARVEL’S 80th ANNIVERSARY!
Three titanic tales celebrating the first decade of Marvel stories! First – an all-new tale of the man they call the Wolverine begins in the 1940s! Then comes Captain America, the first Avenger of World War II still fighting for freedom today! And finally, the untold tale of Namor and the atom bomb!

Marvel Comics Presents #1

Relive the X-Men’s Biggest Events with X-Men Milestones

They are the tales of triumph and tragedy that changed Marvel’s mutants forever…and now, fans everywhere can relive these stories in a new series of trade paperbacks designed to form one complete library of X-Men events!

To start, dive into history with the tragic Jean Grey story that rocked the X-Men and the Marvel Universe in Dark Phoenix Saga by Chris Claremont and John Byrne! Brace yourself as the specter of death looms over three X-teams in Fall of the Mutants by Claremont, Louise Simonson, Marc Silvestri, Bret Blevins and Walter Simonson! And charge into the epic battle between the Morlocks and the Marauders in Mutant Massacre by Claremont, Louise Simonson, Walter Simonson, Ann Nocenti, John Romita Jr., Blevins, Rick Leonardi, Alan Davis, Barry Windsor-Smith, Terry Shoemaker, Butch Guice, Sal Buscema and Jon Bogdanove!

With this new collection, relive the X-Men’s best and the biggest storylines as their adventures remind you why the X-Men have been a cornerstone of the Marvel Universe for decades!

What other earth-shattering events will follow? Stay tuned to Marvel for more…

X-MEN MILESTONES: DARK PHOENIX SAGA

By Chris Claremont and John Byrne

X-MEN MILESTONES: FALL OF THE MUTANTS

By Chris Claremont, Louise Simonson, Marc Silvestri, Bret Blevins and Walter Simonson

X-MEN MILESTONES: MUTANT MASSACRE

By Chris Claremont, Louise Simonson, Walter Simonson, Ann Nocenti, John Romita Jr., Blevins, Rick Leonardi, Alan Davis, Barry Windsor-Smith, Terry Shoemaker, Butch Guice, Sal Buscema and Jon Bogdanove!

Review: Seeds #1

On the surface, The Seeds #1 seems like a winner. It’s a story featuring a harried journalist looking for the truth in an age of clickbait, a wall between a technology and non-technology using area, alien sex, and is Hawkeye and Immortal Iron Fist‘s David Aja‘s return to interior art. However, Ann Nocenti’s plotting jumps all over the place from anecdotes about bees and sex and Chairman Mao to interspersed images of crows and finally, the “good part” of the comic, the story of the aforementioned journalist Astra. I like the idea that the world of The Seeds is much like our own and a little bit like Cold War Berlin with a Neo-Luddite twist. But Nocenti’s worldbuilding comes in fits and cryptic starts.

A mystery is a good thing for a first issue of a comic, but the sequences with the gas mask wearing bee-like aliens lack any real emotional connection unlike the ones with Astra. The journalism and tech-free zone stuff is cool, but the aliens are kind of boring. Maybe, that’s Nocenti’s point: that mid-level alien workers are just as boring as their human equivalent. But it doesn’t make for entertaining reading. There’s an overly labored discussion about bees and pollination as some kind of hackneyed metaphor for what the aliens are doing on Earth too that seems like an excuse to drop the book’s title. At least, Aja pulls off some interesting hive-like layouts, and his art and the character of Astra are Seeds‘ sole redeeming factors.

David Aja works in monochrome in Seeds #1 so you can really see the care in his line work and inking. He uses Benday dots when depicting the technology-free zone and little sputters of light that are like a bright fluorescent light shining down into a dirty room. Human civilization is dying, and Aja’s art nails this better than any chatter about harvesting or people taking drugs that supposedly make you see your own death. He also isn’t afraid to get intimate with his character like spending a whole page showing Astra’s post-work routine as she goes from a disappointing meeting with her boss to hitting a bar to write some puff piece about a new drug on the scene. Two pages, eighteen panels, and we get an understanding of this truth driven, sharp witted, and sometimes cynical journalist. She’s a great character, who is unfortunately stuck in a dull comic.

Even though it’s a post-apocalyptic story, Seeds #1 seems like a Cold War/retro story with references to Roswell, the whole wall thing, and even the alien designs when they pop up.  It’s like those old 2000 AD stories that riffed on the American Civil War or Reagan’s presidency, but in the distant future and trying to be smart and serious. The references to click bait pop readers back into contemporary times and then a panel of a tabloid style newspaper kicks it back to the time of the Red Scare. Along with people abandoning technology, it’s an interesting concept, but sadly Ann Nocenti just mentions it and moves onto alien worker bee harvesting or unrelated juxtaposed images of birds in an attempt to make some point about the end of the world cut-up style. (William S. Burroughs did some of his best work in the 1950s and 1960s so it fits with the whole neo-Cold War shtick.) Or it could be the twin ravens of Odin signaling Ragnarok. Theorizing about this comic was more interesting than reading it.

The Seeds #1 has some ideas with potential like the “Neo-Luddite” zone, an intriguing, if a little pompous protagonist, and the skilled storytelling pacing and economic line work of David Aja. But it has long uninteresting stretches, its world is ill-defined, and goes down too many tangents aka I wasn’t hooked to check out issue two.

Story: Ann Nocenti Art/Letters: David Aja 
Story: 5.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 5.4 Recommendation: Pass

Dark Horse/Berger Books provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: The Seeds #1

The Seeds #1

Writer: Ann Nocenti
Artist, Cover Artist: David Aja
Publication Date: August 1, 2018

In a world much like our own, people are smashing their phones and moving to the lawless tech-free Zone B.

A few cantankerous aliens have come to collect the last dregs of humanity’s essence for the celestial embryo bank. One of them falls in love.

Astra is an idealistic journalist who stumbles into the story of a lifetime, only to realize that if she reports it, she’ll destroy the last hope of a dying world. How far will she go to get her story?

A new four-issue series, by award-winning artist David Aja (HawkeyeImmortal Iron Fist) and filmmaker, journalist Ann Nocenti (DaredevilCatwoman).

Ann Nocenti and David Aja’s The Seeds is Out this August

Dark Horse has revealed art from Ann Nocenti and David Aja’s The Seeds #1The Seeds is a new four-issue series by award-winning artist David Aja and filmmaker, journalist, and comics writer Ann Nocenti. Girl meets alien meets journalist in this eco-thriller love story where fact-based reporting is gasping its last breath, and Mother Nature already has other plans. And what’s with bees? What do they know that we don’t?

The rich have built walls around their wealth and scramble into escape rockets. The romantic and the ruthless cross over into the lawless wilds of Zone-B. A few cantankerous aliens have come to collect the last dregs of humanity’s essence for the celestial embryo bank. One of them falls in love.

The Seeds follows Astra, an idealistic journalist who stumbles into the story of a lifetime, only to realize that if she reports it, she’ll destroy the last hope of a dying world. How far will she go to get her story?

The Seeds #1 goes on sale August 1, 2018.

Movie Review: Chris Claremont’s X-Men

Chris Claremont came to Marvel as a young man, and was assigned a book that no one else wanted, a book on the brink of cancellation: X-Men. Over the next 17 years, his work on the title turned it into the biggest franchise in comic book history. Forty years later, his work has been adapted into ten films, three TV series, countless video games and has become a part of our cultural mythology. But, it all started with one writer and his commitment to emotionally honest storytelling and real character building.

Chris Claremont’s X-Men sees an extended version released this week, a documentary exploring the influential creator’s run and impact. Taking us from his childhood to his exit from the X-Men, the film is an interesting exploration that provides a lot of insight into the creator’s run and why it was both successful and such a big deal.

Featuring interviews with Clarmont, Ann Nocenti, Louise Simonson, and more, secrets are revealed into what went on behind the scenes, both good and bad. The documentary also features interviews with the likes of Rob Liefeld, Marc Silvestri, and hard-core fans who share about the impact on them and dish on some of what went on towards the end.

But, what’s interesting is director Patrick Meaney‘s narrative which feels like it organically came out of the interviews. We see how Claremont saved these characters and drove them to stardom but how that success eventually drove Claremont off of the titles as well. Success brought the need for greater commercial reach which then drove the narrative creating a cycle that feels like it’s plagued comics today in many ways.

And, there’s an honesty about it all. Claremont, Nocenti, and Simonson don’t hold back discussing the good and the bad. Their time on the screen feels like friends together reminiscing about this amazing thing they’ve done. Through their recounting of history, we also get to see how much of modern comics spun out of this series in multiple ways, from talent working today to those behind the scenes. That’s in addition to the world of the X-Men coming to the big and small screen in multiple ways.

Claremont helped launch all of that.

The documentary is low-fi. There’s no fancy graphics or transitions and the shots are pretty basic in production but there’s something charming about that. It’s raw in many ways. There’s use of cosplayers (and unfortunately one of those cosplayers has been accused of horrible things) for transitions which brings down the product a little, but overall, you’re watching this for the history not the production value.

The documentary is fantastic taking the viewer into the important history of the X-Men and Chris Claremont’s hand in all of it. It captures the history, both good and bad, presenting it all without commentary from the director, instead this is history in the own words of people who lived it and were there.

Overall Rating: 8.0

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