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House of Slaughter #1 is Coming October 27 with Over 460,000 Copies Ordered

BOOM! Studios has announced today that the highly anticipated series premiere of House of Slaughter #1 has received a record-breaking orders of over 460,000 copies, making it the best selling original comic book series in BOOM! Studios history after Keanu Reeves’ BRZRKR, and resulting in a new release date of October 27, 2021, to accommodate the volume of orders and ensure quality.

House of Slaughter #1 is a brand new ongoing original series set in the world of creators James Tynion IV and Werther Dell’Edera’s Eisner Award-nominated global phenomenon Something is Killing the Children. The series is co-written by James Tynion IV and writer Tate Brombal, and illustrated by Werther Dell‘Edera and artist Chris Shehan, colorist Miquel Muerto, and letterer AndWorld Design.

You know Aaron Slaughter as Erica’s handler and rival. But before he donned the black mask, Aaron was a teenager training within the House of Slaughter. Surviving within the school is tough enough, but it gets even more complicated when Aaron falls for a mysterious boy destined to be his competition. Discover the inner workings of the mysterious House of Slaughter in this new horror series exploring the secret history of the Order that forged Erica Slaughter into the monster hunter she is today.

House of Slaughter #1 features main cover art by series artists Dell’Edera and Shehan, as well as variant cover art by acclaimed illustrators Alvaro Martinez Bueno, Jenny Frison, Mike Del Mundo, Gabrielle D’Otto and more.

House of Slaughter #1

BOOM! Reveals a House of Slaughter #1 Variant Cover by Gabriele Dell’Otto

BOOM! Studios has revealed today a super rare variant cover by acclaimed artist Gabriele Dell’Otto for House of Slaughter #1, the premiere issue of the brand new ongoing original series in the world of the Eisner Award-nominated Something is Killing the Children, written by co-creator James Tynion IV and co-writer Tate Brombal, and illustrated by co-creator Werther Dell‘Edera and artist Chris Shehan, colorist Miquel Muerto, and letterer AndWorld Design. Discover the inner workings of the mysterious House of Slaughter in this new horror series exploring the secret history of the Order that forged Erica Slaughter into the monster hunter she is today, available on October 20, 2021.

You know Aaron Slaughter as Erica’s handler and rival. But before he donned the black mask, Aaron was a teenager training within the House of Slaughter. Surviving within the school is tough enough, but it gets even more complicated when Aaron falls for a mysterious boy destined to be his competition. . .

House of Slaughter #1 features main cover art by series artists Dell’Edera and Shehan, as well as variant cover art by acclaimed illustrators Alvaro Martinez Bueno, Jenny Frison, and Mike Del Mundo.

House of Slaughter #1 Gabriele Dell’Otto

Check Out these Brand New Character Designs for House of Slaughter #1

BOOM! Studios has revealed character designs of monster hunters-in-training Aaron Slaughter and Jace Boucher by acclaimed artist Werther Dell’Edera for the upcoming House of Slaughter, a brand new ongoing original series in the world of the Eisner Award-nominated Something is Killing the Children. 

House of Slaughter is written by Something is Killing the Children co-creator James Tynion IV and co-writer Tate Brombal, and illustrated by co-creator Werther Dell‘Edera and artist Chris Shehan, colorist Miquel Muerto, and letterer AndWorld Design. Discover the inner workings of the mysterious House of Slaughter, exploring the secret history of the Order that forged Erica Slaughter into the monster hunter she is today, available on October 20, 2021.

You know Aaron Slaughter as Erica’s handler and rival. But before he donned the black mask, Aaron was a teenager training within the House of Slaughter. Surviving within the school is tough enough, but it gets even more complicated when Aaron falls for a mysterious boy destined to be his competition. . .

House of Slaughter #1 features main cover art by series artists Dell’Edera and Shehan, as well as variant cover art by acclaimed illustrators Alvaro Martinez Bueno, Jenny Frison, Mike Del Mundo, and Gabriele Dell’Otto.

Your First Look at House of Slaughter #1

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at House of Slaughter #1, a brand new ongoing original series in the world of the Eisner Award-nominated Something is Killing the Children, written by co-creator James Tynion IV and co-writer Tate Brombal, and illustrated by co-creator Werther Dell‘Edera and artist Chris Shehan, colorist Miquel Muerto, and letterer AndWorld Design. Discover the inner workings of the mysterious House of Slaughter in this new horror series exploring the secret history of the Order that forged Erica Slaughter into the monster hunter she is today, available on October 20, 2021.

You know Aaron Slaughter as Erica’s handler and rival. But before he donned the black mask, Aaron was a teenager training within the House of Slaughter. Surviving within the school is tough enough, but it gets even more complicated when Aaron falls for a mysterious boy destined to be his competition. . .

House of Slaughter #1 features main cover art by series artists Dell’Edera and Shehan, as well as variant cover art by acclaimed illustrators Alvaro Martinez Bueno, Jenny Frison, Mike Del Mundo, and Gabriele Dell’Otto.

HOUSE OF SLAUGHTER #1

Review: Deadbox #1

Deadbox #1

We are the stories we tell ourselves, no matter how stupid they are. This is but one of the sentiments that orbit the satire at the heart of Vault’s latest comic book series, Deadbox. Accompanying that brutally accurate idea is the thought these stories we collectively decide to support can also be cursed. Author Mark Russell and illustrator Benjamin Tiesma tap into the core stupidities of our national narrative, both foundational and current, and come up with a story that’s as funny as it is worrying.

Deadbox follows a woman called Penny who owns a convenience store in a dead-end town called Lost Turkey, a town that also worships freedom as if it were its own god. The town and its people poke fun at Libertarian ideals and conservative thought to create an environment that’s contradictory in every social facet of life. Lost Turkey’s only source of entertainment, as the book says, is a DVD machine that looks like one of those Redbox vending machines where people could rent movies and video games from.

Problem is, the movies in the machine are haunted. Some can only be found in that Lost Turkey’s rental machine and nowhere else. Russell and Tiesma hang on to this detail to create a kind of ‘story within a story’ dynamic where the movie becomes a reflection of the things that are happening in the town, or that are happening to it.

Russell has built quiet a body of work on his own brand of satire. His stories are aware of the commentary he’s putting forth, subtlety be damned in some cases. It makes his comics come off as meta a lot of the times and he’s largely successful at it. Deadbox is another notch on that belt in this regard.

As the story develops, we learn that Penny’s dad is seriously ill and that her choice to rent a movie from the machine will foretell some of the things that ail and will end up ailing the character. This is where Russell’s skill with creating parables and metaphors shines, turning the movie’s sci-fi story of humanity making first contact with an alien civilization into a contemplation on a people’s dreams of progress, what old age means, and how entitled we can come off as while settling in new places.

Lost Turkey itself is a combination of elements that make it a kind of conservative utopia guided by contradictions that celebrate unfettered freedoms regardless of consequence. Gun lovers, safety-defying bikers, and small town political leaders with delusions of grandeur populate this place and each one offers a chance to think about the backwardness of our political culture.

Deadbox #1

Tiesma’s art makes sure the script’s satire never skips a beat by leaning into caricature in his portrayal of the townspeople and the characters that appear in the story’s movie segments. Body language and panel transitions are imbued with a theatrical flair that rewards careful observation and close reading. The humor’s in the details in this one and Tiasma capitalizes on every chance he gets to dial it up.

Deadbox is an incredibly smart comic that finds a lot to be scared of in stupidity, but also a lot to laugh at. The first issue of the series stands on the strength of its sharp wit and its visual comedy. There’s a lot of stupid in the world right now and Deadbox is here to make fun of it.

Story: Mark Russell Art: Benjamin Tiesma,
Colors: Vladimir Popov, Letterer: Andworld Design
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Read and try not to do stupid things.

Vault provided Graphic Policy with a free copy of the comic for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: The Nice House on the Lake #3

The Nice House on the Lake #3 continues the impressive run for the series which delivers an amazing mystery, so solid tense moments, and lots of emotion.

Story: James Tynion IV
Art: Álvaro Martínez Bueno
Colors: Jordie Bellaire
Letterer: Andworld Design

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Amazon
Kindle


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Painful Memories Resurface in LaToya Morgan’s Dark Blood #3

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Dark Blood #3, the next issue of an evocative new six-issue original series from screenwriter LaToya Morgan, rising star artist Moisés Hidalgo, colorist A.H.G., and letterer AndWorld Design, about a young man forging a brave new future for himself and his family while dealing with his past, available on September 22, 2021.

When is the cure worse than the disease? At first Dr. Carlisle’s generous offer to treat Avery’s chronic pain and injuries seems like a godsend, but the “magic bullet” cure he offers comes with an excruciating administration via spinal tap… and unexpected side effects. When those manifest in seemingly impossible ways that terrify his family, Avery rushes back to the doctor for additional help, but will the second treatment truly work or only bring back memories of the war best kept in Avery’s past?

Dark Blood #3 features main cover art by acclaimed artist Valentine De Landro, and variant covers by illustrators Juni Ba, and Christian Ward.

Dark Blood #3

Earl Review: Deadbox #1

Deadbox #1

We are the stories we tell ourselves, no matter how stupid they are. This is but one of the sentiments that orbit the satire at the heart of Vault’s latest comic book series, Deadbox. Accompanying that brutally accurate idea is the thought these stories we collectively decide to support can also be cursed. Author Mark Russell and illustrator Benjamin Tiesma tap into the core stupidities of our national narrative, both foundational and current, and come up with a story that’s as funny as it is worrying.

Deadbox follows a woman called Penny who owns a convenience store in a dead-end town called Lost Turkey, a town that also worships freedom as if it were its own god. The town and its people poke fun at Libertarian ideals and conservative thought to create an environment that’s contradictory in every social facet of life. Lost Turkey’s only source of entertainment, as the book says, is a DVD machine that looks like one of those Redbox vending machines where people could rent movies and video games from.

Problem is, the movies in the machine are haunted. Some can only be found in that Lost Turkey’s rental machine and nowhere else. Russell and Tiesma hang on to this detail to create a kind of ‘story within a story’ dynamic where the movie becomes a reflection of the things that are happening in the town, or that are happening to it.

Russell has built quiet a body of work on his own brand of satire. His stories are aware of the commentary he’s putting forth, subtlety be damned in some cases. It makes his comics come off as meta a lot of the times and he’s largely successful at it. Deadbox is another notch on that belt in this regard.

As the story develops, we learn that Penny’s dad is seriously ill and that her choice to rent a movie from the machine will foretell some of the things that ail and will end up ailing the character. This is where Russell’s skill with creating parables and metaphors shines, turning the movie’s sci-fi story of humanity making first contact with an alien civilization into a contemplation on a people’s dreams of progress, what old age means, and how entitled we can come off as while settling in new places.

Lost Turkey itself is a combination of elements that make it a kind of conservative utopia guided by contradictions that celebrate unfettered freedoms regardless of consequence. Gun lovers, safety-defying bikers, and small town political leaders with delusions of grandeur populate this place and each one offers a chance to think about the backwardness of our political culture.

Deadbox #1

Tiesma’s art makes sure the script’s satire never skips a beat by leaning into caricature in his portrayal of the townspeople and the characters that appear in the story’s movie segments. Body language and panel transitions are imbued with a theatrical flair that rewards careful observation and close reading. The humor’s in the details in this one and Tiasma capitalizes on every chance he gets to dial it up.

Deadbox is an incredibly smart comic that finds a lot to be scared of in stupidity, but also a lot to laugh at. The first issue of the series stands on the strength of its sharp wit and its visual comedy. There’s a lot of stupid in the world right now and Deadbox is here to make fun of it.

Story: Mark Russell Art: Benjamin Tiesma,
Colors: Vladimir Popov, Letterer: Andworld Design
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Read and try not to do stupid things.

Vault provided Graphic Policy with a free copy of the comic for review


Pre-Order: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Static: Season One #3

Static: Season One #3

I’ve generally enjoy the reboot of the Milestone line of comics. Each series has had a different focus and voice but all come together for a bigger story. Static launched the line with a youthful experience, energy, and style. There’s been some choices I’ve felt have been a little odd but overall, it’s an interesting story and direction. Static: Season One #3 amplifies some of the concerns I had but those concerns are a feature, not a bug.

Writer Vita Ayala has taken a familiar concept and given it a twist with the series. The story of a teenager gaining powers and having to learn to use them, and find a guiding focus, isn’t anything that’s new. It’s a formula that’s been done over and over. What Ayala is doing that’s different is putting those powers front and center. While there’s some kids who are hiding their powers, overall, a lot of the “discovery” is front and center. That works in some ways and not in others.

Static: Season One #3 really moves the story of the “Bang babies” forward. The government is making their moves to capture those who have powers seeing them as a threat. Virgil, meanwhile, is having issues of his own with some of the police have him cornered after his seeking help. The idea of powers being more out in the open is an interesting one. It changes up the familiar formula we’ve seen before, but also leaves issues with characters like Static who people have seen use his powers. Why the government is banging down his door needs to be explained a little better. It’s easy to just explain away as “optics” but it’s something that’s not being done well enough. That “issue” is the slight hang-up I have with the series so far.

But, Ayala keeps some of what works with the formula around and it works really well. There’s friendship and family at the center of the comic and it leaves its hero with a support structure you don’t see often. This isn’t the hero on an island on his own with the burden of life on his shoulders. There’s a support group here that works and adds a layer to the series. Ayala also does a great job of explaining what the characters are able to do and why. Why is Virgil able to sew a costume? There’s an element of show as well as tell that makes events go down a bit smoother in a way.

Nikolas Draper-Ivey and Chriscross each take a bit of the story. Draper-Ivey and Wil Quintana handle the color with Andworld Design doing the lettering. The art continues to be a solid aspect of the series with a style about it that enhances the youthful vigor of the comic. It’s a great example of voice and visuals matching as far as the tone.

Static: Season One #3 is a good comic. It takes some of my concerns and attempts to use them to shake a familiar formula up. We’ll see how well it does that in future issues, but for now it’s clear the series is doing things a bit different and keeping things fresh and interesting.

Story: Vita Ayala Art: Nikolas Draper-Ivey, Chriscross
Color: Nikolas Draper-Ivey, Wil Quintana Letterer: Andworld Design
Story: 7.75 Art: 8.05 Overall: 7.9 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Dark Blood #2 Sells Out and Gets a Second Printing

BOOM! Studios has revealed that Dark Blood #2, the next issue of an evocative new six-issue original series from screenwriter LaToya Morgan, rising star artists Walt Barna and Moisés Hidalgo, colorist A.H.G., and letterer AndWorld Design, about a young man forging a brave new future for himself and his family while dealing with his past, has sold out at the distributor level the week of release!

In response to the overwhelming support from retailers and fans, BOOM! Studios has announced Dark Blood #2 Second Printing, featuring cover art by acclaimed artist Valentine De Landro, available in stores September 22, 2021.

Does even the kindness of strangers come with a cost? Avery has adjusted to his post-WWII life in Alabama, but when an altercation with some local boys leaves him hurt, an unlikely bystander steps in. And while Carlisle, a white university doctor, not only offers Avery immediate first aid but free ongoing medical care… nothing is truly free, not even a stranger’s generosity.

Dark Blood #2 Second Printing
Almost American
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