Tag Archives: andrew dalhouse

Review: Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot is back with a few new thrilling tricks up his sleeve in Bloodshot #1!

No amount of high-octane explosions can keep Bloodshot from completing his new mission. Who is the mysterious BLACK BAR, and what do they want with Bloodshot?

Bloodshot: Rising Spirit left a bit of a sour taste in my mouth. It wasn’t bad on the whole. A lot of the positives from that series writing comes from the contributions of Eliot Rahal. It stumbled artistically too in places. On the whole, was far from the quality of the previous Bloodshot series Reborn and Salvation.

Bloodshot #1 washes that taste entirely from my mouth.

Reading this comic the week of the real G7 Summit gives the comic a very timely feel. I particularly enjoyed the real world nod to the British Prime Minister’s first introduction to this level of the political sphere. It’s through his eyes that we are first (re)introduced to Bloodshot. Writer Tim Seeley, artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe make the bold, and much appreciated, choice not to retell the character’s origin.

Again.

Instead, for those who may be coming to this series because of the upcoming movie (release date of which is currently billed as February 2020) there is a brief recap of how the character came to be. It makes sense within the story and only needs just over a page and change. Most of that is dedicated to visual homages to previous series. That serves as a nice tip of the hat to longtime readers, and just looks awesome for newcomers (and everyone, really).

The comic’s story is, when you really look at it, pretty straight forward. There are no real surprises, though there’s nothing telegraphed either. Which is a strange sentence to write, but I’ll stick by it. Bloodshot #1 is a perfect (re)introduction to Bloodshot. It’s packed with exactly what you’d hope from with a character who is a walking army. It’s an extended fight sequence lovingly brought to life by the artistic team and some exposition along with explanation as to the general direction Seeley and the team will be taking Bloodshot over the next few issues.

It is, ultimately, a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story.

But the simplicity of the plot is actually one of the comic’s strengths and is the reason that you’ll be coming back. The simplicity is the hook. It pulls you in and you’re reminded that a comic doesn’t need to have anything more than the perfect balance of words and pictures to be a great piece of art.

Seeley doesn’t try to over complicate things, leaving plenty of room in the story for Booth, Corona and Dalhouse to flex their creative muscles. The art in this comic is right up my alley; clean lines, interesting panel usage and layouts, and some sharp and subtle colouring work. There’s a timelessness to this issue’s art; it looks as though it could have been published at any point in the last fifteen years whilst remaining fresh and exciting from cover to cover. Dalhouse utilizes a colouring method that feels far less digitally coloured than it probably is – his work adds a warmth to Booth and Corona’s black and white artwork.

As an issue, Bloodshot #1 is a comic with the final product being greater than the sum of its parts. I absolutely love it.

The list of comics I’ve read this week that are as good as Bloodshot #1 is depressingly small. This is just the ticket if you want an action-packed explosion of fun on your pull list.

Make no mistake, I will be buying this when it’s released next month.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Bloodshot #1

BLOODSHOT #1

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH
Inks by ADELSO CORONA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by DECLAN SHALVEY
Cover B by DAVE JOHNSON
Cover C by HANNAH TEMPLER
Cover D B/W/R Variant by JONBOY MEYERS
Pre-Order Edition by TIM SALE
Carbon Fiber Finish Variant Edition by JONBOY MEYERS
FOC on SEPTEMBER 2nd (reviews by then are greatly appreciated)
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 25th

An all-new ongoing series starts here!

Bloodshot is a nanite-fueled supersoldier forever at war. What happens to the world when he starts picking his own battles?

Will this one-man army be able to end the fighting—or just leave more destruction in his wake?

BLOODSHOT #1

Preview: Bloodshot #1

BLOODSHOT #1

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH
Inks by ADELSO CORONA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by DECLAN SHALVEY
Cover B by DAVE JOHNSON
Cover C by HANNAH TEMPLER
Cover D B/W/R Variant by JONBOY MEYERS
Pre-Order Edition by TIM SALE
Carbon Fiber Finish Variant Edition by JONBOY MEYERS
FOC on SEPTEMBER 2nd (reviews by then are greatly appreciated)
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 25th

An all-new ongoing series starts here!

Bloodshot is a nanite-fueled supersoldier forever at war. What happens to the world when he starts picking his own battles?

Will this one-man army be able to end the fighting—or just leave more destruction in his wake?

BLOODSHOT #1

Advanced Review: Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot is back with a few new thrilling tricks up his sleeve in Bloodshot #1!

No amount of high-octane explosions can keep Bloodshot from completing his new mission. Who is the mysterious BLACK BAR, and what do they want with Bloodshot?

Bloodshot: Rising Spirit left a bit of a sour taste in my mouth. It wasn’t bad on the whole. A lot of the positives from that series writing comes from the contributions of Eliot Rahal. It stumbled artistically too in places. On the whole, was far from the quality of the previous Bloodshot series Reborn and Salvation.

Bloodshot #1 washes that taste entirely from my mouth.

Reading this comic the week of the real G7 Summit gives the comic a very timely feel. I particularly enjoyed the real world nod to the British Prime Minister’s first introduction to this level of the political sphere. It’s through his eyes that we are first (re)introduced to Bloodshot. Writer Tim Seeley, artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe make the bold, and much appreciated, choice not to retell the character’s origin.

Again.

Instead, for those who may be coming to this series because of the upcoming movie (release date of which is currently billed as February 2020) there is a brief recap of how the character came to be. It makes sense within the story and only needs just over a page and change. Most of that is dedicated to visual homages to previous series. That serves as a nice tip of the hat to longtime readers, and just looks awesome for newcomers (and everyone, really).

The comic’s story is, when you really look at it, pretty straight forward. There are no real surprises, though there’s nothing telegraphed either. Which is a strange sentence to write, but I’ll stick by it. Bloodshot #1 is a perfect (re)introduction to Bloodshot. It’s packed with exactly what you’d hope from with a character who is a walking army. It’s an extended fight sequence lovingly brought to life by the artistic team and some exposition along with explanation as to the general direction Seeley and the team will be taking Bloodshot over the next few issues.

It is, ultimately, a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story.

But the simplicity of the plot is actually one of the comic’s strengths and is the reason that you’ll be coming back. The simplicity is the hook. It pulls you in and you’re reminded that a comic doesn’t need to have anything more than the perfect balance of words and pictures to be a great piece of art.

Seeley doesn’t try to over complicate things, leaving plenty of room in the story for Booth, Corona and Dalhouse to flex their creative muscles. The art in this comic is right up my alley; clean lines, interesting panel usage and layouts, and some sharp and subtle colouring work. There’s a timelessness to this issue’s art; it looks as though it could have been published at any point in the last fifteen years whilst remaining fresh and exciting from cover to cover. Dalhouse utilizes a colouring method that feels far less digitally coloured than it probably is – his work adds a warmth to Booth and Corona’s black and white artwork.

As an issue, Bloodshot #1 is a comic with the final product being greater than the sum of its parts. I absolutely love it.

The list of comics I’ve read this week that are as good as Bloodshot #1 is depressingly small. This is just the ticket if you want an action-packed explosion of fun on your pull list.

Make no mistake, I will be buying this when it’s released next month.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #6

The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #6

The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #6, the captivating conclusion has arrived!

It is going to be very difficult to talk about this issue without spoiling anything about the series. So I’m going to break the review into two parts; one will be utterly spoiler free and full of analogies and metaphors and the other will begin with a very obvious spoiler warning, because although I won’t give away major plot points for The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #6, I will assume you’ve read the five issues released so far. If you want to read the spoiler free bit and drop down, you can do that easily. You’ll find the scores at the end after a clear notice the spoilers have ended.

If ever there has been a series that encapsulates excellence in comic book story telling, it’s this one. The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada is the kind of book you really should go in completely blind too. Whether you read Valiant’s comics or not, this series is one you should read. As the end of Harada’s tale (that’s not a spoiler, that’s a statement based on the series name), this couldn’t be more fitting. A hero to many, a villain to more; a man many have thought of as a god, and who has been labelled as a devil, over the course of his life should not have an ending in black and white.

There’s a lot to this series. A lot to unpack.

Toyo Harada is the kind of character that doesn’t come around often, and when they do, they’re always divisively popular as they begin to make one question whether they are truly villainous or merely driven by their goals. Harada was often framed as the villain in Harbinger, though one can argue that was simply because of the side of the story we were following, rather than the character being evil (again, there’s the divisive aspect of the man – there are more times than not that I find myself agreeing with his goals, but not always his methods). As Alan Moore wrote in Watchmen “I understand. Without condoning or condemning, I understand.”

I wrote this in the review of the second issue, and have yet to find a better descriptor of the character from my own words.

Obviously, there’ll be a lot more to unpack than I could possibly go into without staying spoiler free. But let’s just say that you won’t read this book just once.

It’s a story you’ll want to read numerous times; like any great book, each read gives you a deeper understanding of the material. Each read allows you to pick up on details you missed the first or second time in much the same way a video review allows a referee to go back and look again at a play – it gives them more clarity on the moment.

Each read of this book, this wonderful story wrapped in some of the best art you’re likely to see in a comic, just gets better and better.


Begin Spoilers


Alright. There will be spoilers here, but only minor if you’ve read the previous issue.

When The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #5 ended we were thrown a curve ball on the final page. I genuinely did not see it coming; the first part of this issue is dedicated to explaining how the final page of the previous issue, with Harada being a bit more than the atomic stain we assumed he was by the mid point of the story, tying up the loose ends that Dysart had been leaving us to pull at.

After Harada’s utter defeat at the coalition of nations and companies arrayed against him, we get to see an entirely new side to that conflict. We see how Harada had planned for and anticipated almost everything. We see how his story comes full circle. It’s a surprisingly emotional comic that will leave you with more questions about how you see the world; about how you interpret the phrase “the ends justify the means” and it will leave you rethinking your personal definition of hero and villain.

The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #6 is more than a comic. I mean yes, it is literally a comic, but it serves as so much more; it’s the finale to perhaps the greatest miniseries of the year, it’s a brilliant read in it’s own right. Dysart will play with your expectations like a lead guitarist plucking out a solo on stage or a mariachi manipulating the strings in an intimate setting. He twists around Harada’s tale before finally revealing his hand in a near perfect moment.

For while Harada has lost personally, he was willing to sacrifice everything so that his ideals would live on. In so doing, he ensure that his enemies are able to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

There were less spoilers there than I expected.


End Spoilers


This has been a fantastic journey from beginning to end. If you haven’t read Dysart’s full run with the character, I highly suggest you do so. That way you’ll get the full impact of this story. If you haven’t, and you don’t want to, then you should still read The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada. It’s the kind of comic that other publishers wish they had; this has been the jewel in Valiant’s cap this year, and comes at a time when the publisher is just getting their feet under them once again after a couple of misses in 2018. Utterly phenomenal.

Story: Joshua Dysart Art: Cafu and Doug Braithwaite
Colours: Andrew Dalhouse
and Diego Rodriguez Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided a FREE copy for review, but this is a book I’ll be buying when it hits the racks.

Rai’s Begins his Fight this November from Dan Abnett and Juan José Ryp

Writer Dan Abnett and breathtaking artist Juan José Ryp welcome you to the 41st century in RAI, the must-read sci-fi epic of 2019! The cyborg samurai, Rai, embarks on a thrilling quest to save the future in a journey that will introduce new worlds, new characters, and gripping adventures.

Feast your eyes on artwork from issues one, two, three, four…and FIVE below, and check out what’s to come in the next half a year of RAI with the creative team and editor!

RAI #1, the first chapter of the enthralling sci-fi ongoing series, goes on sale November 20th, 2019, featuring colors by Andrew Dalhouse, letters by Dave Sharpe, and covers by Juan, Adam Pollina, and José Ladrönn!

RAI #1

Preview: Britannia Deluxe Edition HC

BRITANNIA DELUXE EDITION HC

Written by PETER MILLIGAN
Art by JUAN JOSÉ RYP, ROBERT GILL, RYAN LEE, ROBERTO DE LA TORRE, JUAN CASTRO, BRIAN THIES
Colors by JORDIE BELLAIRE, FRANKIE D’ARMATA, JOSÉ VILLARRUBIA, DIEGO RODRIGUEZ, ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover by DAVE JOHNSON
$49.99 | 320 pgs. | T+ | On sale JULY 31st | HARDCOVER | ISBN: 978-1-68215-320-8

On the fringes of civilization, the world’s first detective is about to make an unholy discovery.

In the remote outpost of Britannia, Antonius Axia – the First Detective – will become Rome’s only hope to reassert control over the empire’s most barbaric frontier…and keep the monsters that bridge the line between myth and mystery at bay.

Collecting BRITANNIA #1–4, BRITANNIA: WE WHO ARE ABOUT TO DIE #1–4, and BRITANNIA: LOST EAGLES OF ROME #1–4, along with over 20+ pages of rarely seen art and extras!

BRITANNIA DELUXE EDITION HC

Review: The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #5

The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #5

In The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #5, Toyo Harada is dead! 

The long-lost secret of Harada’s estranged son revealed! Harada’s final allies stand strong as they protect their master’s vision!

The penultimate issue of Valiant’s The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada shows how the members of Harada’s team are dealing with his demise and the fall of his dream. That Toyo Harada could be seen as a villain is a fairly obvious statement; he was the antagonist of much of the Harbinger series, after all. The opposite can also be said. Harada’s primary goal has always been to create a Utopian society. One where the problems and issues stemming from current governing systems can be avoided or corrected. One has to ask, in the face of this utopia, which he will do anything to achieve, is the world justified in declaring war against Harada?

Who is the villain in this story that has more grey areas than a certain book series.

Toyo Harada is the kind of character that doesn’t come around often, and when they do, they’re always divisively popular as they begin to make one question whether they are truly villainous or merely driven by their goals. Harada was often framed as the villain in Harbinger, though one can argue that was simply because of the side of the story we were following, rather than the character being evil (again, there’s the divisive aspect of the man – there are more times than not that I find myself agreeing with his goals, but not always his methods). As Alan Moore wrote in Watchmen “I understand. Without condoning or condemning, I understand.”

I wrote this in the review of the second issue, and felt it needed repeating. This is a book that lives in the moral grey areas, and I love it.

The Life and Death of Toyo Harada #5 opens with some poignant and at times heartbreaking moments. It features Harada’s allies as they each come to terms with his death in their own way. Stronghold’s thread reveals a little more about Harada’s past through the eyes of a young Stronghold. Sunlight On Snow’s scenes are an absolute highlight of the comic. They’re beautifully presented and are one highlight among a comic full of wonder.

I’ve already mentioned that artistically, The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #5 is freaking awesome. With the talent of Cafu and Kano, who are joined by colourist Andrew Dalhouse, the expectations are obviously going to be high – and they’re more than met. When a series has so much potential as this one has, it’s easy to assume that maybe there’d be a fault to find – either with the art or with Joshua Dysart‘s writing. There isn’t. This book, indeed the entire series, is nigh on perfect.

It’s actually kinda hard to explain in words just how awesome this series is; both as a capstone to Dysart’s run with the character, but also as a standalone series about a man who knows he’s destined for greatness. The series as a whole has risen from strength to strength, and with one issue left, I’m already earmarking this as being an early favorite for my top comic of 2019.

Story: Joshua Dysart Art: Cafu and Diego Yapur
Colours: Andrew Dalhouse
and Diego Rodriguez Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided a FREE copy for review, but this is a book I’ll be buying when it hits the racks.

Preview: The Life and Death of Toyo Harada #5 (of 6)

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF TOYO HARADA #5 (of 6)

Written by JOSHUA DYSART
Art by CAFU, KANO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by BUTCH GUICE
Cover B by RAÚL ALLÉN
Cover C by JACK HERBERT
$4.99 | 40 pgs. | T+ | On sale JULY 17th

Toyo Harada is dead! 

The long-lost secret of Harada’s estranged son revealed! Harada’s final allies stand strong as they protect their master’s vision!

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF TOYO HARADA #5 (of 6)

Preview: Fallen World #3 (of 5)

FALLEN WORLD #3 (of 5)

Written by DAN ABNETT
Art by ADAM POLLINA
Colors by ULISES ARREOLA
Letters by JEFF POWELL
Cover A by BRETT BOOTH with ADELSO CORONA and ANDREW DALHOUSE
Cover B by FERNANDO DAGNINO with ULISES ARREOLA
Cover C by CASPER WIJNGAARD
Pre-Order Edition by DAVID MACK
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale JULY 10th

The mind-controlled Bloodshot enlists the help of the Church Fallen to further his nefarious plans!

Rai comes face-to-face with the animalistic hybrids of the Kor’Tunga clan!

Can Rai stop the resurrection of Father, his greatest enemy, before it’s too late?

FALLEN WORLD #3
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