Tag Archives: abbott 1973

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Preview: Abbott 1973 #3 (of 5)

Abbott 1973 #3 (of 5)

(W) Saladin Ahmed (A) Sami Kivela (CA) Taj Tenfold
In Shops: Mar 17, 2021
SRP: $3.99

The dark forces terrorizing Detroit have struck Elena Abbott where it hurts most… and she’s going to strike back.

But even after pulling together an uneasy alliance with the last people she expected, Abbott is about to learn her enemies are one step ahead of her…

…and it might cost Abbott the person she loves most.

Abbott 1973 #3 (of 5)

Preview: Abbott 1973 #2 (of 5)

Abbott 1973 #2 (of 5)

(W) Saladin Ahmed (A) Sami Kivela (CA) Taj Tenfold
In Shops: Feb 17, 2021
SRP: $3.99

An old friend sends an ominous warning to Abbott – her enemies have returned to weaken her by any means necessary.

As the personal losses mount and her efforts at the newspaper are blocked, Abbott finally catches a break – uncovering one of the most guarded secrets of the group aiming to take down the man who would be Detroit’s first Black mayor.

But all victories come with a cost… and this one may be too high for Abbott to pay!

Abbott 1973 #2 (of 5)

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

We Live #5

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Abbott 1973 #2 (BOOM! Studios) – Some solid mystery continues in 1970s Detroit with a tinge of politics thrown in.

Black Cotton #1 (Scout Comics) – In this alternate timeline the social order of “white” and “black” is reversed and we’re all in to see where this series takes the concept.

Black Friday #1 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Years of pent-up negative energy from Black Fridays has built up and unleashed something very evil and dark into a superstore.

Black Widow #5 (Marvel) – The series has been amazing mixing action with some great visuals.

History Comics: The Wild Mustang, Horses of the American West (:01 First Second) – Learn how horses were brought to the Western Hemisphere by Spanish conquistadors and immediately became a crucial part of the American story.

Hollow Heart #1 (Vault Comics) – EL used to be human. Now he’s a jumble of organs in a bio-suit. EL is also in tremendous pain and has been for a very long time. Described as a queer monster love story, the concept seems very unique.

The Immortal Hulk: Flatline #1 (Marvel) – The series of one-shots have done a great job of allowing various creators tell their tales of this version of the Hulk. So far, they’ve been great.

King in Black #4 (Marvel) – It’s an event that’s really be paying off. Can’t wait to see where it all goes.

Michael Jackson in Comics (NBM) – A biography mixing comics and documentary chapters taking us from the Jackson 5 through his solo career.

Mieruko-Chan Vol. 2 (Yen Press) – What other strange encounters await Miko?

M.O.D.O.K.: Head Games #3 (Marvel) – The issue has been laugh out loud funny with every issue.

Pepper Page Saves the Universe! (:01 First Second) – Pepper encounters a strange cat named Mister McKittens and stumbles into a volatile science experiment run by a sinister substitute teacher named Doctor Killian. Yeah, we’re in for this.

The Recount #2 (Scout Comics) – The first issue blew us away with American citizens taking up the government corruption into their own hands.

Savage #1 (Valiant) – Teenage heartthrob. Feral social icon. Dinosaur hunter? Kevin Sauvage has a taste of home when a mutant dino threat invades England!

Second Coming: Only Begotten Son #2 (AHOY Comics) – Chaos, weirdness, and corndogs reign when Jesus innocently stumbles into Bible Safari, a profit-squeezing amusement park that trades in his image. That alone has us reading this fantastic take on religion and superheroes.

The Shadow Doctor #1 (AfterShock) – A Black doctor in the 1930s us unable to get work in Chicago’s hospitals and turns to the Prohibition-era Chicago Mafia to make some money.

Steambound #1 (Behemoth Comics) – Hound is a knight of the order’s restricted council while Yaeger is genetically modified and works for the city’s criminal cartels. They’ll force to team up again.

We Live #5 (AfterShock) – Extinction day hits humanity. We’re at the edge of our seats.

White Lily #1 (Red 5 Comics) – Lilya Litvak is destined to become the greatest female fighter pilot of all time, flying for the Russian Army in World War II against the Germans. But first she has to get through the training.

Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #1 (Dark Horse) – An unknown adventure of a younger Hellboy!

Around the Tubes

Future State: Nightwing #1

It was new comic book day yesterday. What’d you all get? What’d you like? What’d you dislike? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Publisher’s Weekly – Tapas Sees Big Gains for Digital Comics – This is the comic space to watch. Webtoons have a massive reader base and it’s only going to get bigger.

Reviews

The Beat – Abbott 1973 #1
Games Radar – Avengers #41
Collected Editions – Doctor Fate Vol. 1: The Blood Price
The Geekiary – Future State: Nightwing #1
The Beat – Terminal Punks #3

Review: Abbott 1973 #1

The minute I finished the first Abbott book by Saladin Ahmed and Sami Kivelä it became my go-to recommendation for people looking to get into comics. It still holds that position. A lot of it is due to how much like a contemporary comic it feels like, as if you were reading something that couldn’t have come out any other time, despite it being set in 1970’s Detroit while also borrowing ideas from the political thrillers and horror movies of that decade.

To say I was anxiously awaiting the first issue of its second arc is an understatement of the highest order. Following the investigations of journalist Elena Abbott—“a  detective for the people,” as the comic proclaims—feels like taking a journey through the underbelly of America’s unique version of systemic racism, a brutal trek through it with the intention of deconstructing all of it with dark magic thrown into the mix to further power the metaphors at play in the story.

Abbott 1973

The second arc seems to be operating on the same wavelength, with Abbott facing yet another supernatural threat fueled by racial animosity, only this time the powers of corruption are looking to dismantle the candidacy of a Detroit mayoral candidate poised to become the city’s first black person to take up the position.

Set in 1973, Ahmed and Kivelä keep the titular journalist from straying from her old-school investigative methods, echoing movies like All the President’s Men in terms of how it develops a sense of danger that bubbles up with each attempt at shedding light on the potential sabotage of the black mayoral candidate. Each new sliver of information dug up through her investigation raises the stakes not just for the story she’s working on but for her very own sense of safety.

Ahmed and Kivelä achieve this in the first book, which focuses on elected officials dabbling in dark magic to keep black communities in a constant state of chaos and instability, a tactic that allowed the ruling class to justify anti-black measures in the name of public safety (not to mention precious votes).

In Abbott 1973, the protagonist is now well aware of the dark influences that are trying to disrupt Detroit’s political structure while also being conscious of the fact magic and journalism have a complicated history with the public standard of veracity and reliability.

Abbott 1973

While these ideas are difficult to separate from the character and her story, Ahmed and Kivelä manage to complicate Abbott’s daily grind even more with an added focus on social notions of femininity in the public arena and in the professional workspace.

The comic dives into these obstacles through a new black character that comes into Abbott’s newspaper organization as its latest publisher, a man called Mr. Manning. This new figure of authority insists on keeping up appearances concocted by male-dominated notions of etiquette and behavior, instructing Abbott on how women should dress and behave in the workplace.

Given the story’s focus on change, and how the election of Detroit’s first black mayor stands as a plea for it, Abbott 1973 #1 looks to the country’s past to reflect on the current state of politics, be it racial or otherwise. Just how deep the comic will go to comment on this remains to be seen, but it’s well on its way to add something to the conversation (especially in the context of a very divided United States that’s growing further apart on a daily basis).

Kivelä’s art continues to favor that 1970’s grittiness prominent in that decade’s movies, deftly weaving realism with supernatural sights that carry a kind of violence to them on mere presence alone. Each character looks storied, the result of a long line of personal experiences that carry over into their overall looks.

Abbott 1973

Mattia Iacono’s colors complements the seventies vibe of the story beautifully with muted colors that make the darker elements jump out of the page even more when they manifest themselves. It creates a heaviness around the more horror-inclined sequences and can feel downright oppressive when Abbott as at the receiving end of them.

On the dark magic side of the story, Abbott 1973 is careful not to allow it to get lost in the social commentary that’s clearly in display in every page. Be it in hints of paranormal activity or outright terror, the hauntings Ahmed and Kivelä have cooked up for Abbott feel like an organic element of the story and they do their fair share of the worldbuilding. They are integral to the comic’s message and are smartly implemented.

Abbott 1973 #1 is a perfect continuation of Elena Abbott’s investigations into how magic has been taken over by racists bent on keeping America divided. Ahmed and Kivelä have one of the best characters in comics in their hands and they seem to be well aware of it. Abbott is the kind of creation one hopes becomes an industry staple, producing hundreds of stories for years to come.

Script: Saladin Ahmed Art: Sami Kivelä
Color: Mattia Iacono Letterer: Jim Campbell
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy and brush up on Detroit history


Purchase: comiXologyZeus Comics

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

We Live #4

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Abbott 1973 #1 (BOOM! Studios) – The first series was fantastic with its setting and well everything. This new volume takes us to 1973 where a group wants to destroy a Black candidate for Mayor.

Crimson Flower #1 (Dark Horse) – The latest from Matt Kindt and Matt Lesniewski, the series is a mind-altering journey through Russian folk tales, trained assassins, and government conspiracies. We’re all in for this.

DC Future State (DC Comics) – The two-month event has been pretty solid so far. Even the “ok” comics have been entertaining and there have been some amazing comics. This week’s releases include Future State: Catwoman #1, Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1, Future State: Nightwing #1, Future State: Shazam! #1, Future State: Superman: Worlds of War #1, and Future State: The Next Batman #2.

I Breathed a Body #1 (AfterShock) – The world’s biggest influencer posts something irredeemably horrific online which instantly changes the world. It’s up to his social media manager, Anne Stewart, to fan the flames of outrage and create a sensationalist campaign that rewrites the rules of “banned content.” Well, ok then.

Iron Fist: Heart of the Dragon #1 (Marvel) – Larry Hama writing this is all the reason we need for it to make the list.

King in Black #3 (Marvel) – The event has been top-notch and really feels like an over the top summer blockbuster film. It’s a sit back and enjoy the popcorn fun.

Legacy of Mandrake the Magician #4 (Red 5 Comics) – Wrapping up the series which has been a great update to the classic character. It’s been a solid and fun read so far.

Maestro: War and Pax #1 (Marvel) – The first volume of Maestro’s journey was a bit hit and miss but we want to see where this next one takes things.

Savage Circus #2 (Heavy Metal) – Mix Gremlins and Die Hard together and you have this series which features monsters and a heist during a Christmas storm. The first issue was a great setup so we’re hoping this one really brings the action.

We Live #4 (AfterShock) – The series has been amazing when it comes to worldbuilding and with some fantastic art too. Each issue has been full of twists and turns and who knows where this one is going.

Yasmeen #6 (Scout Comics) – One of the best comics of the past year wraps up as Yasmeen must face her past while the police investigate her.

Preview: Abbott 1973 #1 (of 5)

Abbott 1973 #1 (of 5)

(W) Saladin Ahmed (A) Sami Kivela (CA) Taj Tenfold
In Shops: Jan 20, 2021
SRP: $3.99

In a new series for fans of Something is Killing the Children and Bitter Root, Saladin Ahmed, the visionary writer behind Miles Morales: Spider-Man, and Sami Kivelä, the acclaimed artist behind Tommy Gun Wizards, reunite for this Must Read supernatural thriller.

Detroit’s hardest hitting journalist, Elena Abbott, is trying to make a fresh start at a new newspaper…but her deadly past isn’t ready to let go.

The city is days away from the historic election of a Black candidate as their new Mayor, but a vicious new group has emerged to destroy him, targeting anyone who supports his campaign or the change he represents.

That means Abbott, who discovers the group’s connection to a dangerous dark magic, has been targeted for certain death – unless she embraces her true power as the Lightbringer to save her city.

Abbott 1973 #1 (of 5)

Comics Deserve Better Episode 12: Beyond the Demon, The Sea by Ben Goldsmith, Davy Broyles, and Justin Birch/Burning Tree by Nuna

On this week’s Comics Deserve Better, Brian, Darci, and Logan discuss a couple of horror one-shots from Source Point Press. The comics are the maritime scarefest Beyond the Demon, The Sea by Ben Goldsmith, Davy Broyles, and Justin Birch and the almost-silent Gothic horror book Burning Tree by Nuna. They also chat about indie comics news like Heavy Metal‘s Magma Comix imprint, Abbott 1973, TKO‘s third wave of graphic novel, and Dark Horse Comics‘ Halloween sale. Other comics mentioned on the show include Culdesac, Blood on the Tracks, Die, Bitter Root, Death of the Horror Anthology, and Maids. (Episode art by Nuna)

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