Author Archives: Brett

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Review: History Comics: The American Bison – The Buffalo’s Survival Tale

First Second is taking you throughout history with their new line of “History Comics“! The American Bison – The Buffalo’s Survival Tale takes readers through the interesting history of the animal going from 30 million strong to near extinction.

By: Andy Hirsch

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon (paperback)
Amazon (hardback)
Kindle
Bookshop


First Second provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Project Patron #4

Patron is the world’s greatest superhero. He died in battle and returned! Or did he? With the shocking ending to the first issue, Project: Patron #4 delivers the “Get up Rock” moment as the team must deal with their greatest threat yet.

Story: Steve Orlando
Art: Patrick Piazzalunga
Color: Carlos Lopez
Letterer: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


Aftershock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Batgirl has been unmasked as Leslie Grace Lands the Role of Barbara Gordon

Batgirl #50

Reports have been coming out that Warner Bros. and DC have found their Barbara Gordon/Batgirl in Leslie Grace. Grace is considered a rising star after her breakout role in In the Heights.

The casting has not been confirmed but Grace has confirmed it herself on Twitter.

Batgirl currently is going to be an HBO Max release and one of the major properties to debut exclusively on the platform. Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah will direct the film off of a script by Christina Hodson. Kristin Burr is producing.

Generally, Batgirl is Barbara Gordon, the daughter of Commissioner Gordon who must deal with balancing the Gotham Police force and masked vigilantes in the city, including his daughter.

Batgirl was created by Bill Figner and Sheldon Moldoff and debuted in Batman #139 in April 1961. Originally Betty Kane, she later became Barbara Gordon in 1967. Gordon debuted in Detective Comics #359 in January 1967 by writer Gardner Fox and artist Carmine Infantino. Others have donned the cape and cowl including Huntress Helena Bertinelli, Cassandra Cain, and Stephanie Brown.

Review: The Fifth Quarter

Lorin Block loves playing on the fourth-grade basketball team. She plays during the fifth quarter before the real game starts. But, Lori wants to pursue her passion for the sport which forces her to balance her hobby, family, and friends.

Story: Mike Dawson
Art: Mike Dawson

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon (paperback)
Amazon (hardcover)
Kindle
Bookshop


First Second provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Blue & Gold #1

Blue & Gold #1

Blue Beetle and Booster Gold are two DC characters I don’t know a ton about. They’ve been ancillary characters in the various DC Comics I’ve read. But, a series starring the two isn’t something I’ve experienced. I know the basics of each and generally don’t have a lot of opinions about them. The read I’ve had is it’s the buddy cop type combo with one being rather serious and grounded while the other plays the role of a comedian. Blue & Gold #1 gets the duo front and center in a new miniseries that reintroduces them in a way to the “Infinite Frontier” direction of the DC Universe.

Dan Jurgens returns to his creation of Booster Gold who’s chasing clout and dollars as a superhero. He’s taken to social media live streaming his antics in hopes of getting viewers and that translating into dollars. It’s a perfect update to the character and the situation makes a whole lot of sense based on his personality. Unfortunately, his abilities are taxed when he goes up against an alien who has captured the Justice League. Somehow, Booster thinks he can stop a threat that’s taken out the Justice League. Hence Blue Beetle being called in to help Booster with his task.

Jurgens uses social media well in the issue as we get a solid sense of how the public sees these two and their reactions. The responses generally the tone is right though the comments feel a little tame to what reality would be. It gives a good gauge in the public response. We also get a sense of how well Booster’s schtick is going over as a whole. Jurgens also nails the banter between Booster and Beetle. There’s a perfect flow and back and forth between the two that’s straight out of the buddy cop stories that work. It’s a classic formula but it’s one that works well for these two.

The art by Ryan Sook is solid. With lettering by Rob Leigh, the look of the comic has a modern mixed with 80s feel about it. It’s not flashy in any way but is really great visually. This isn’t a comic full of splash pages and dynamic poses but instead fits its comedic duo. It focuses on the reactions of the two playing off the physical comedy they bring to the story. The alien ship and robot obstacle don’t feel all that exciting but instead it’s the details the art brings. When the two walk down a street, as an example, the reaction of those around them is something to focus in on. It adds to not just the story but the characters as well.

Blue & Gold #1 is a fun debut. It has a nice mix of classic DC and modern DC setting this duo on their new adventure. The comic brings something to DC’s line we’re not getting anywhere else and is a solid addition to the superhero lineup. Here’s hoping there are some bigger plans for them beyond these issues because based on this debut, this is a team that we’ll want to see more of when this adventure wraps up.

Story: Dan Jurgens Art: Ryan Sook Letterer: Rob Leigh
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Silver City #3

Welcome to Silver City, it’s where you go after you die. And it holds an intriguing mystery. Silver City #3 has everyone trying to figure out what’s going on with Ru as they attempt to find the portal to the world of the living.

Story: Olivia Cuartero-Briggs
Art: Luca Merli
Color: Luca Merli
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Moon Knight #1

Moon Knight #1

With a high-profile television show on the horizon, Marvel has started its push for Moon Knight. After his recent storyline in The Avengers comic, Marc Spector headlines a new volume of his series with Moon Knight #1. And, the result is a bit mixed in its result. The concept of the comic is solid but it seems to be a rather surface representation of the character, one who has had a mixed history when it comes to his writers.

Written by Jed MacKay, Moon Knight #1 casts Spector as a protector of the night. He now runs the Midnight Mission where he defends those who “travel at night”. This puts him in conflict with the “monster” aspects of the Marvel Universe like vampires, rat men, the things that go bump in the night. When he’s not doing that, he’s seeing his appointed shrink to help him work through his issues. Spector is the “Fist of Konshu”, the priest of the god of the moon who is tasked with fighting evil. He also has Dissociative Identity Disorder, so there’s a whole question as to what’s real at times and what’s due to that.

At that surface level, the comic is great. There’s fantastic pacing and action. Spector is an engaging lead and the supporting cast and upcoming conflict are intriguing. The comic works really well as Marvel’s version of Batman… who really does have some issues to work through.

But, the comic fails the character as well.

Moon Knight is one of the high-profile Jewish characters in the Marvel Universe. The son of a Rabbi, Spector had a troubled relationship with his upbringing becoming a mercenary. His Judaism has been a varying part of the character depending on the writer with those who are of that faith delivering a bit more insight into the varying conflicts within those of the newer generation. MacKay’s take feels like it’s setting the groundwork to not just reject Spector’s Jewish upbringing but borders on the erasure of it.

In one panel, Spector discusses his being a “High Priest” of Konshu to which he is challenged by his psychiatrist who notes it’s a contradiction from his Jewish upbringing. Moon Knight states “My father was a Rabbi, I was a war criminal. Contradictions are nothing new for me.” The rest of the comic spends its time emphasizing the “High Priest” aspect without again mentioning Spector is Jewish. And there points to a failure in the character and those handling them.

Konshu is an Egyptian god who has “enslaved” a Jewish individual to do his bidding. The Biblical connotations are clear and the writing could easily play with the Jewish enslavement by Egyptian Pharaohs and their eventual exodus from bondage. But, MacKay doesn’t. He gives us a Spector who is ok with his role. We should be getting Moses but instead, we get acquiescence. We should get the real conflict that many Jews face every day, but instead, we get complete assimilation into his role. There’s an aspect, and one that would elevate the series and character, that’s missing. We get the action but not the depth.

Alessandro Cappuccio‘s art is beautiful. With Rachelle Rosenberg‘s colors and Cory Petit‘s lettering, the comic is visually fantastic. There’s such a dichotomy in the art switching between scenes of banter between Spector and his supporting cast and all-out action. The comic is absolutely fantastic looking keeping up a run of artists who have not just done the character justice but nailed the look and tone of the character and series.

Moon Knight #1 isn’t bad. It’s full of action and great banter. But, it’s missing a key element so many of the character’s writers have missed. There’s a perspective and conflict within Spector that seems to be skipped over again and again. Still, it’s an entertaining comic if you’re looking for Marvel’s Batman taking on things that bump in the night.

Story: Jed MacKay Art: Alessandro Cappuccio
Color: Rachelle Rosenberg Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Sandcastle

Early morning on a perfect summer’s day, people begin to descend on an idyllic, secluded beach. Among their number, a family, a young couple, a refugee, and some American tourists. Its fine white sand is fringed with rock pools filled with crystal clear water. The beach is sheltered from prying eyes by green-fringed cliffs that soar around the cove. But this utopia keeps a dark secret.

Sandcastle is the inspiration for M. Night Shyamalan’s major motion picture Old.

Story: Pierre Oscar Lévy
Art: Frederik Peeters

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Amazon
Kindle
Bookshop


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Theatres Blast Disney’s Dual Release for Black Widow’s Second Week Drop

Black Widow

The National Association of Theatre Owners isn’t happy about Black Widow‘s release in movie theaters and on Disney+. The organization released a press statement on Sunday concerning the 67% drop in the second week of the film. The organization blamed piracy and Disney+ for the results.

The organization charged that the Premiere Access availability of the film would have gone to traditional theaters if it did not exist.

NATO stated:

Despite assertions that this pandemic-era improvised release strategy was a success for Disney and the simultaneous release model, it demonstrates that an exclusive theatrical release means more revenue for all stakeholders in every cycle of the movie’s life.

The organization went on to state the film “should have” opened between $92 to $100 million and based on preview revenue the film should have been between $97 million and $130 million.

They go on to argue that the simultaneous release costs Disney money due to multiple individuals in a household.

Black Widow was the most pirated film for the week according to Torrent Freak. But, the major releases are usually the top pirated film when they’re released.

NATO further stated that:

This was also the case for all simultaneous releases (Wonder Woman 1984, Godzilla vs Kong, Cruella, Mortal Kombat). This did not happen for F9 or A Quiet Place Part II. How much money did everyone lose to simultaneous release piracy? The many questions raised by Disney’s limited release of streaming data opening weekend are being rapidly answered by Black Widow’s disappointing and anomalous performance. The most important answer is that simultaneous release is a pandemic-era artifact that should be left to history with the pandemic itself.

NATO of course is making numerous leaps in its assumptions and claims. It assumes those consuming in Disney+ would go into theaters. It also ignores that Disney+ subscriptions are required to view the film generating long-term ongoing revenue on top of Premiere Access dollars. It also ignores the stats. People went into theaters for numerous series that saw the dual releases on multiple platforms. A Quiet Place II premiered on Paramount Plus this past week and saw only a 27% dip.

Black Widow‘s reviews have been good but not stellar. While it has a 92% audience score on Rottentomatoes, the Tomatometer is 81%. The general consensus has been while the film is entertaining, it’s not one you need to rush out to see.

The fact is, the landscape has changed in the short and long term and instead of figuring out how to adapt, NATO is likely doing a disservice to its members with these sorts of baseless statements. At this point, theaters need Disney, Paramount, and Universal more than the studios need theaters.

(via Deadline)

Weekly Preview! AfterShock and First Second Deliver Two Each

There’s a lot of comics coming out this week to be covered. Check out some of what we’ll be reviewing and this is only the beginning!

This week’s reviews include:

  • Cici’s Journal (First Second)
  • Cici’s Journal: Lost and Found (First Second)
  • Project Patron #4 (AfterShock)
  • Silver City #3 (AfterShock)

AfterShock and First Second provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review

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