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Super-Articulate: The rest of Mr. Hyde (and Katy!)

Welcome back, figure hunters! As you’ve read in recent weeks on Graphic Policy, the Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings Marvel Legends assortment has had a bit of a strange release. Figures slipped out ahead of the April 25 street date at some stores, the pre-order information didn’t go up until April 24, and it was generally a very odd roll-out. But that’s over, the figures are in stores all over the place, and I’ve obtained the remaining four in the Mr. Hyde BAF wave, as well as the Target exclusive Katy. Let’s break it down.

Wenwu: There’s no way around this: Tony Leung Chiu-wai, aka Tony Leung, is a f——g legend. LEGEND. A massive star of Asian cinema and one of its greatest actors, period, the casting of Leung as Shang-Chi’s father Wenwu (and *cough*TheMandarin*cough) is a coup of epic proportions. So obviously, they have to do a good job with the figure’s face. And they DID. Hasbro has really improved the facial rendering on MCU figures by leaps and bounds.

The whole assortment has some really great costume detailing. There are intricate patterns and textures on the figures that you can tell took time. Those are also pieces that wouldn’t easily be repurposed, meaning that this is a case when those parts were created expressly for this wave without a huge chance they’d be used again. The Wenwu figure benefits from the double-elbow joint, which is great for posing. You’ll notice the five rings on each forearm; advance buzz is that this is how the Mandarin’s ten comic book (finger) rings are represented in the film. That’s a striking look, and another unique pair of pieces. Like other figures in this assortment, Wenwu comes with various hands for fight posing. Nice work overall.

Death Dealer: The cinematic Death Dealer has a great look. That mask is awesome, and the figure captures it. Like Wenwu, there are highly detailed vinyl elements. The paint color on this figure in particular pops; the blue is very deep and rich. DD comes with multiple hands, two of which are devoted to knife throwing effects. One holds a single knife as if it’s about to be thrown; the other has two in flight. I like dynamic accessories like this that can suggest action even in static posing. There is a slight bit of posing difficult on the figure’s left side, as the cut of the tunic and the stiffer vinyl prevents that leg from accessing full poseability.  Nevertheless, it’s a great look, and there are creative ways to address that if you’d like. This might be my favorite on the group on sheer look.

Xialing: Shang-Chi’s sister Xialang gets an excellently poseable figure. Like the other Shang-Chi figures, this one comes with multiple hands for fight choreography posing. I realize that it’s specific to the character design from the film, but it’s always refreshing when a female figure isn’t in heels. For one thing: much, much easier to stand. While this figure isn’t quite as visually interesting as some of the others, I feel like the utility of being able to pose it well makes up for that.

Civil Warrior: The Civil Warrior figure is based on the character designed used in the Contest of Champions game. Some parts appeared to be repurposed from the previously released “Hydra Cap,” but I have to say that this one looks great. Nice color choices and great paint apps, particularly on the distressed shield, really stand out. And this figure has some great poseability as well. I realize that this won’t be everyone’s bag; hell, I wasn’t super-excited when it was announced. But it was definitely one that makes a strong impression in person. Solid.

Mr. Hyde: I’ve been waiting for Mr. Hyde for a long time, mainly because he was part of the “Under Siege” Masters of Evil line-up. Also, with Mr. Hyde in the line, that should theoretically move Quake closer to reality. I might have preferred the earlier look to the slightly more dapper Hyde, but this is a GREAT BAF. My favorite detail is the bloodshot eyes. What a great idea, and what fine execution. Love the cane as a big-ass accessory. It’s not often that the BAFs get an accessory that large designed for them (Cull Obsidian and armored Thanos aside), so it’s great to see the work go into it. Suit color is great and the figure comes out appropriately huge. I really like this and, for “Under Siege” reasons, I’m glad he’s bigger than the Wrecking Crew. Well done.

Katy (and Morris) Target Exclusive: If you’ve read this column, then you know that Exclusives are a bane of my existence. I had very good luck ordering the Target exclusive Retro Rogue and Gambit online a few months ago, though, so I tried to be optimistic. A few hours before the stores opened for the April 25 onsale date, the Target app added this one for order. I placed a pick-up order online, paid with Red Card (5% off, kids), and picked it up later. Incredibly easy.

Outside of being an exclusive, this one has been contentious online for a few reasons. One, people have mocked the name Katy. Y’know, it’s the character’s name. If she has another, hidden identity, they’re hiding it, and that’s fine. Two, the comparison between her outfit and Mulan. Seriously, that’s your gripe? Three, that it’s Awkwafina. That’s your own problem. And Four . . . Morris.

Morris (whose name we know because he comes in a Lego set, and is named on the box) is a DiJiang. It’s a divine bird from Chinese folklore. Obviously, the movie plans to lean into more of the wuxia genre; if you’re unfamiliar with the term, it means “martial heroes,” and references legendary heroes from ancient China, frequently represented in fantasy literature or film (notably, to American audiences, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Hero). It makes sense to incorporate the genre, especially if the film contains a rumored appearance by Fin Fang Foom (a Great Protector dragon character has already been spotted in action toy and Lego form) and also features guardian lions (glimpsed in the trailer). So, as far as all that goes, Morris is cool. He’s a great value-add to the figure.

As for Katy herself, I think that the figure landed a good likeness of the actor. The bow, quiver, and arrows are all new accessories, and the quiver in particular is tailored to fit the figure. The long dress outfit is restrictive for posing, but it’s definitely distinctive and doesn’t look quite like any other figure in the line. In fact, one of the best things about the Shang-Chi figures in general is that have a unique identity, which is great on a number of levels.

If one thing characterizes this assortment, it’s EFFORT. You can see it in the detail, you can see it in the elbows, and you can see it in the willingness to make new pieces and accessories. They’re primarily new characters, they’re colorful, and they’re not like any Legends assortment we’ve seen before. I like them even more than I expected to, and I always consider that a fine compliment.

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